According to the Crown Chronicles:

… orb and sceptre are used at the coronation of each new Sovereign…. But why are they used and what do they mean?

The Sovereign’s Orb…is a symbol of Godly power. A cross above a globe, It represents ‘Christ’s dominion over the world’, as the Monarch is God’s representative on Earth.

It is presented to the Sovereign [thus]: “Receive this orb set under the cross, and remember that the whole world is subject to the Power and Empire of Christ our Redeemer.”

The Sovereign’s sceptre…represent[s] the temporal power of The King or Queen, and is associated with good governance.

To read the entire article in the Crown Chronicles, please click here.

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Robert E. Lee in 1870.

Robert E. Lee in 1870.

After the [Civil] war [Robert E. Lee] became president of Washington College. He had found the new duty. “I have led so many of the young men of Virginia to battle and to death,” he said, “Now, I would like to give the remainder of my life to teaching them how to live.”

Lee sitting, photographed in 1865

For this purpose, [Robert E. Lee] gave up his dream of a “little home in the woods;” for this purpose, he put behind him his grief, bent himself once more to the high task of making citizens. He obligated himself to the loyalties of the old flag, by example and precent he tried to ameliorate the bitterness. To one who claimed to be a minister of religion, who vented his bitterness against their Northern foes in his presence [Robert E. Lee] said: “Doctor, there is a good old book which I read and you preach from, which says ‘Love your enemies; bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them that despitefully use you.’ Do you think your remarks this evening were quite in the spirit of that teaching? I have fought against the people of the North because I believed that they were seeking to wrest from us our rights, but I have never cherished toward them bitter or vindictive feelings. I have never seen the day that I did not pray for them.”

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“Civilization’s Problem Is The Problem Of Peace.  The Passing of the Sword is Cornerstone of Magnificent.  Lecture by Jenkin Lloyd Jones of Abraham Lincoln Center upon the South Lauds Hero, Robert E. Lee, the Man Who Conquered Defeat,” in Arizona Republican, March 25, 1914.

 

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 539

 

 

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By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

 

An excessive ‘mellowing’ of customs led to a lack of appetite for war; this, along with a growing influence of sentimentality and the action of the ‘troubadours’ put an end to the crusading spirit.

lazy

Now, while this explains the crusading spirit, it does not explain very well the decadence of the crusading spirit. Because the Church ‘sweetened’ very much people’s customs and with that the propensity of people to join the fray was much diminished. The instinct of self-preservation, which powerfully dominates men, began to play a much greater role than at the time of the barbarian invasions. And admiration of cultural things in civil life brought about a lack of appetite for war even as it diverted men from excellent things that intellectual life can produce in times of peace.

And then came about the influence of sentimentality, troubadours, and everything else that presaged the Renaissance.

Vision of a Knight by   Raphael is an example of Proto-Renaissance art, which was during the decline of the Middle Ages and the start of the Renaissance.

Vision of a Knight by Raphael is an example of Proto-Renaissance art, which was during the decline of the Middle Ages and the start of the Renaissance.

(Excerpt from an Almoço Tuesday, Jan. 30, 1990 – Nobility.org)

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Saint Elizabeth Bichier des Ages

Jeanne-Élisabeth_Bichier_des_Ages

She was born of a rich, noble family on July 5, 1773, at the Château des Ages, France. Raised in a pious home, she developed at an early age a close relationship with God and a genuine love for the poor.

St. André-Hubert Fournet

St. André-Hubert Fournet

She was twenty-five when she first met André Hubert Fournet at one of his clandestine masses at Les Marsillys. He soon enlisted her help in teaching the faith and caring for the sick and needy. Her magnetic personality and her cause soon attracted other young women to join her. After a few years, the group became a religious congregation known as Les Filles de la Croix (The Daughters of the Cross). Sister Jeanne Elisabeth, commonly known as “la Bonne Soeur” (the Good Sister), died at La Puye, France on August 26th, 1838, at the age of sixty-five. At the time, there were 600 sisters working in 99 different parts of France. On July 6, 1947, the Church officially proclaimed Jeanne Elisabeth Bichier des Ages a saint.

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St. Monica

Widow; born of Christian parents at Tagaste, North Africa, in 333; died at Ostia, near Rome, in 387.

We are told but little of her childhood. She was married early in life to Patritius who held an official position in Tagaste. He was a pagan, though like so many at that period, his religion was no more than a name; his temper was violent and he appears to have been of dissolute habits. Consequently Monica’s married life was far from being a happy one, more especially as Patritius’s mother seems to have been of a like disposition with himself. There was of course a gulf between husband and wife; her almsdeeds and her habits of prayer annoyed him, but it is said that he always held her in a sort of reverence. Monica was not the only matron of Tagaste whose married life was unhappy, but, by her sweetness and patience, she was able to exercise a veritable apostolate amongst…

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Saint David Lewis, alias Charles Baker

(Recté, according to his own entry in the English College David Henry Lewis).

Saint David Lewis, engraving 1683

Saint David Lewis, engraving 1683

An English Jesuit martyr, born in Monmouthshire in 1616; died at Usk, 27 August, 1679. His father, Morgan Lewis, was a lax Catholic, afterwards converted; his mother, Margaret Pritchard, was a very devout Catholic. David was brought up as a Protestant, and educated at the Royal Grammar School at Abergavenny, of which his father was the head master. In his sixteenth year, he…

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St. Augustine of Hippo

Statue of St. Monica, the Mother of St. Augustine.

Statue of St. Monica, the Mother of St. Augustine.

The great St. Augustine’s life is unfolded to us in documents of unrivaled richness, and of no great character of ancient times have we information comparable to that contained in the “Confessions,” which relate the touching story of his soul, the “Retractations,” which give the history of his mind, and the “Life of Augustine,” written by his friend Possidius, telling of the saint’s apostolate.

We will confine ourselves to sketching the three periods of this great life: (1) the young wanderer’s gradual…

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Pope Pius VI

(GIOVANNI ANGELICO BRASCHI).

Born at Cesena, 27 December, 1717; elected 15 February, 1775; died at Valence, France, 29 Aug., 1799. He was of a noble but impoverished family, and was educated at the Jesuit College of Cesena and studied law at Ferrara. After a diplomatic mission to Naples, he was appointed papal secretary and canon of St. Peter’s in 1755. Clement XIII appointed him treasurer of the Roman Church in 1766, and Clement XIV made him a cardinal in 1775. He then…

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Part of the Baptist’s ministry was exercised in Perea: Ennon, another scene of his labours, was within the borders of Galilee; both Perea and Galilee made up the tetrarchy of Herod Antipas. This prince, a son worthy of his father Herod the Great, had married, likely for political reasons, the daughter of Aretas, king of the Nabathaeans. But on a visit to Rome, he fell in love with his niece Herodias, the wife of his half-brother Philip (son of the younger Mariamne), and induced her to come on to Galilee. When and where the Precursor met Herod, we are not told, but from the synoptic Gospels we learn that John dared to rebuke the tetrarch for his evil deeds, especially his public adultery. Herod, swayed by Herodias, did not allow the unwelcome reprover to go unpunished…

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St. Sabina

The tomb of St. Sabina, which is in the church "Santi Pietro e Paolo" in Ascona.

Widow of Valentinus and daughter of Herod Metallarius, suffered martyrdom about 126. According to the Acts of the martyrdom, which however have no historic value, she lived at Rome and was converted to Christianity by her female slave Serapia. Serapia was put to death for her faith and later, in the same year, Sabina suffered martyrdom. In 430 her relics were brought to the Aventine, where a basilica, which is very interesting in the history of art, is called after St. Sabina. Originally the church was dedicated to both saints. The feast of St. Sabina is celebrated on 29 August.

Klemens Löffler (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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St. Sebbi, or Sebba

Map of Essex.

Map of Essex.

This prince was the son of Seward, and in the year 664, which was remarkable for a grievous pestilence, began to reign over the East Saxons, who inhabited the country which, now comprises Essex, Middlesex, and the greater part of Hertfordshire; he being the tenth king from Erkinwin, founder of that kingdom, in 527, and sixth from Sebert, the first Christian king, who founded St. Paul’s church, and Thorney abbey, about the year 604. Sebba was, by his wise and pious government, the father of his people, and a perfect model of all virtues, and on the throne sanctified his soul by the most heroic exercises of austere penance, profuse alms-deeds, and assiduous prayer. When he had reigned happily, and with great glory, during thirty years, he resigned his crown to his two sons, Sigeard and Senfrid, which he had long before desired to do, in order to be more at liberty to prepare himself for his last hour. His queen took the religious veil about the same time. Subscription7 St. Sebba received the monastic habit from the hands of Waldhere, successor of St. Erconwald in the bishopric of London, whom he charged with the distribution of all his personal estates among the poor. Our saint seemed to have death always present to his mind; and his grievous fears of that tremendous passage were at length converted into a longing joyful hope. After two years spent in great fervour in monastic retirement, he died at London, in holy joy, about the year 697, having been forewarned by God of his last hour three days before. Bede assures us that his death was accompanied with many miracles and heavenly favours. His body was interred in St. Paul’s church, and his tomb was to be seen there, adjoining the north wall, till the great fire in 1666. His Latin epitaph is extant in Weever’s Funeral Monuments, 1 as follows:—“Here lies Sebba, king of the East Saxons, who was converted to the faith by St. Erconwald, bishop of London, in 677. A man very devout to God, and fervent in acts of religion, constant prayer, and pious alms-deeds. He preferred a monastic life to the riches of a kingdom, and took the religious habit from Waldere, bishop of London, who had succeeded Erconwald.” His name occurs in the Roman Martyrology. See Bede Hist. l. 3, c. 30, l. 4, c. 11. Abo F. Alford’s Annals, (ad an. 693, t. 2, p. 413.) whose collection is a very valuable treasure of the ecclesiastical history of this nation, as our most learned antiquary Bishop Fleetwood observes, though the light of criticism must direct the reader in some parts of the work.

(from: The Lives of the Saints, by Rev. Alban Butler (1711–73).  Volume VIII: August, p. 559)

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One can easily imagine two things: first, that this religion proper to each city must have formed the city in a powerful and almost unshakeable way—it is, in fact, marvelous how this social organization has endured, in spite of its faults and chances of ruin; secondly, that this religion must have had the effect, over a period of centuries, of rendering impossible the establishment of a social form other than that of the city.

The Old Temple and The Fountains Painted by Hubert Robert

Each city, through the exigencies of its religion, had to be absolutely independent. Each had to have its own special code, since each had its religion and it was from the religion that the laws were derived. Each had to have its own sovereign justice and could have no justice higher than that of the city. Each had its religious holidays and calendar; the months of the year could not be same in two cities, since the series of religious acts was different. Each had its own currency which, originally, was stamped with its religious emblem. Each had its weights and measures. No one believed that there should be anything in common between two cities….

Libation scene on a terracotta, which was used to hold offerings.

Greece never succeeded in forming a single state; nor were the Latin cities, Etruscan cities, or Samnite cities ever able to form a compact unit. The incurable division of Greeks has been attributed to the nature of their country, and people say that the mountains that cross it created natural lines of demarcation between men. But there were no mountains between Thebes and Plataea, between Argos and Sparta, between Sybaris and Croton. Nor were there any between the cities of Latium, or between the twelve cities of Etruria. Physical nature no doubt plays some role in the history of a people, but man’s beliefs play a more powerful role still. Between two neighboring cities there was therefore something more impassable than a mountain: It was a series of sacred obstacles, the differences of cults, the barrier each city erected between strangers and its gods….

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For this reason the ancients could not establish nor even conceive of a social organization other than the city. Neither the Greeks, nor the Italians, nor even the Romans for a very long period of time, had the idea that several cities could unite and live with equal rights under the same government. Between two cities there may well be an alliance, a temporary association with an eye toward a profit to be gained or a danger to repel, but never was there a complete union. For religion made of each city a unit which could not join to any other. Isolation was the law of the city.

The Chariot of Zeus

With the beliefs and the religious practices that we have seen, how could several cities merge into a single state? People did not understand human association, and it did not seem right unless it was based on religion. The symbol of this association had to be a shared, sacred repast. A few thousand citizens could easily, if necessary, gather together around the same prytaneum, recite the same prayer, and share sacred foods. But just try, with these customs, to make a single state of the whole of Greece!

To join two cities into a single state, to unite the vanquished population with the victorious one and merge them under the same government, this is never seen among the ancients, with one exception [Rome]….

The Secession of the People to the Mons Sacer, engraved by B.Barloccini, 1849

This absolute independence of the ancient city could only cease when the beliefs upon which it was based had completely disappeared. Only after the ideas had been transformed and many revolutions had taken place in ancient societies could one begin to conceive of and establish a larger state ruled by other laws. But for this it was necessary for men to discover other principles and a social bond other than those of ancient times. (Foustel de Coulanges, La Cité Antique, book 2, pp. 237-241 passim).

Nobility Book

Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, Nobility and Analogous Traditional Elites in the Allocutions of Pius XII: A Theme Illuminating American Social History (York, Penn.: The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family, and Property, 1993), Documents VII, pp. 500-501.

 

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Alvarez Carillo Gil de Albornoz

A renowned cardinal, general, and statesman; born about 1310 at Cuenca in New Castile; died 23 Aug., 1367, at the Castle of Bonriposo, near Viterbo, in Italy.

His father, Don Garcia, was a descendant of King Alfonso V of Leon, and his mother, Teresa de Luna, belonged to the royal house of Aragon. After studying law at Toulouse, he became royal almoner, soon after Archdeacon of Calatrava, and, finally, on 13 May, 1338, Archbishop of Toledo. In 1340…

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St. Philip Benizi

Propagator and fifth General of the Servite Order, born at Florence, Italy, August 15, 1233; died at Todi, in Umbria, August 23, 1285.

His parents were scions of the renowned Benizi and Frescobaldi families. After many years of married life had left them childless, Philip was granted to them in answer to their prayers. When but five months old, on beholding St. Alexis and St. Buonagiunta approaching in quest of alms, he exclaimed: “Mother, here come our Lady’s Servants; give them an alms for the love of God”. At thirteen years of age, in view of his precocious genius, he was sent to the University of…

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St. Rose of Lima

Virgin, patroness of America, born at Lima, Peru 20 April, 1586; died there 30 August, 1617.

Saint Rose was born Isabel Flores y de Oliva in the city of Lima, the Viceroyalty of Peru, then part of New Spain. She was one of the many children of Gaspar Flores, a harquebusier in the Imperial Spanish army, born in San Germán on the island of San Juan…

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Saint Philip Benizi, Servite Priest
(1233-1285)

Saint Philip Benizi was born in Florence on the Feast of the Assumption, 1233. That same day the Order of Servites was founded by the Mother of God. As an infant one year old, Philip spoke when in the presence of these new religious, and announced the Servants of the Virgin. Amid all the temptations of his youth, he longed to become a Servant of Mary, and it was only the fear of his own unworthiness which made him yield to his father’s wish and begin to study medicine. He received the bonnet of a doctor of medicine at Padua…

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Saint Bartholomew’s Day

This massacre of which Protestants were the victims occurred in Paris on 24 August, 1572 (the feast of St. Bartholomew), and in the provinces of France during the ensuing weeks, and it has been the subject of knotty historical disputes.

The first point argued was whether or not the massacre had been premeditated by the French Court – Sismondi, Sir James Mackintosh, and Henri Bordier maintaining that it had, and Ranke, Henri Martin, Henry White, Loiseleur, H. de la Ferrière, and the Abbé Vacandard, that it had not. The second question debated…

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St. Ouen

(OWEN; DADON, Latin Audaenus).

Archbishop of Rouen, b. at Sancy, near Soissons about 609; d. at Clichy-la-Garenne, near Paris, 24 Aug., 683. His father, Autharius, and his mother, Aiga, belonged to the Gallo-Roman race. Shortly after Ouen’s birth they came to Ussy-sur-Marne, where he spent his childhood, with which tradition connects a series of marvelous events. Being afterwards sent to the Abbey of St. Medard he received an education which caused him to be welcomed at the court of Clothaire II a short time previous to the death of that prince. The latter’s…

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St. Joseph Calasanctius

(Calasanz)

San_José_de_Calasanz

Called in religion “a Matre Dei”, founder of the Piarists, born 11 Sept., 1556, at the castle of Calasanza near Petralta de la Sal in Aragon; died 25 Aug., 1648, at Rome; feast 27 Aug.

His parents, Don Pedro Calasanza and Donna Maria Gastonia, gave Joseph, the youngest of five children, a good education at home and then at the school of Petralta. After his classical studies at Estadilla he took up philosophy and jurisprudence at Lerida and merited the degree of Doctor of Laws, and then with honours completed his theological course at Valencia and Alcalá de Henares. His mother and brother having died, Don Pedro wanted Joseph to marry and perpetuate the family. God interfered by sending a sickness in 1582 which soon brought Joseph to the brink of the grave. On his recovery he was ordained priest 17 Dec., 1583, by Hugo Ambrose de Moncada, Bishop of Urgel. Joseph began his labours as priest in the Diocese of Albarracin, where Bishop della Figuera appointed him his theologian and confessor, synodal examiner, and procurator, and when the bishop was transferred to Lerida his theologian followed him to the new diocese. In 1586 della Figuera was sent as Apostolic visitator to the Abbey of Montserrat, and Joseph accompanied him as secretary. The bishop died the following year and Joseph left, though urgently requested to remain.

Altar dedicated to St. Joseph Calasanz at the Monastery of Montserrat. Photo by Amadalvarez.

Altar dedicated to St. Joseph Calasanz at the Monastery of Montserrat. Photo by Amadalvarez.

He hurried to Calasanza only to be present at the death of his father. He was then called by his Bishop of Urgel to act as vicar-general for the district of Trempe. In 1592 he embarked for Rome, where he found a protector in Cardinal Marcantonio Colonna who chose him as his theologian and instructor to his nephew. Rome offered a splendid field for works of charity, especially for the instruction of neglected and homeless children, many of whom had lost their parents. Joseph joined a Confraternity of Christian Doctrine and gathered the boys and girls from the streets and brought them to school. The teachers, being poorly paid, refused to accept the additional labour without remuneration. The pastor of S. Dorotea, Anthony Brendani, offered him two rooms and promised assistance in teaching, and when two other priests promised similar help, Joseph, in November, 1597, opened the first public free school in Europe.

The Last Communion of St. Joseph Calasanz, painted by Goya.

The Last Communion of St. Joseph Calasanz, painted by Goya.

Pope Clement VIII gave an annual contribution and many others shared in the good work, so that in a short time Joseph had about a thousand children under his charge. In 1602 he rented a house at S. Andrea della Valle and commenced a community life with his assistants and laid the foundation of the Order of Piarists. Much envy and opposition arose against him and his new institute, but all were overcome in time. In 1612 the school was transferred to the Torres palace adjoining S. Pantaleone. Here Joseph spent the remaining years of his life in his chosen calling. He lived and died a faithful son of the church, a true friend of forsaken children. His body rests in S. Paltaleone. His beatification was solemnized on 7 Aug., 1748, and his canonization by Clement XIII, 16 July, 1767.

The life of St. Joseph Calasanctius has been written by – Timon-David (Marseilles, 1883); Hubert (Mainz, 1886); Tomaseo (Rome, 1898); Heidenreich (1907). Cf. Hist. polit. Blatter, CXX, 901; Fehr in Kirchenlexicon, s. v.

FRANCIS MERSHMAN (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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The following text is taken from an informal lecture Professor Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira gave on August 25, 1964. It has been translated and adapted for publication without his revision. –Ed.

August 25 is the feast of Saint Louis IX, king, confessor of the Faith, Crusader and model of a Catholic head of state. There are two different ways people picture Saint Louis IX. One is as he truly was, the other is a soft, effeminate distortion of his person.

This dichotomy is similar to the one that exists between many artists’ renditions of Saint Pius X and pictures of him. On the one hand, the photographs portray a giant of a man, strong soul and spiritual king, conscious of his dignity.

On the other hand, many artists depict a feeble old grandfather, whose face begs pardon for being pope and regrets that he is not a simple…

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August 25 – King, Crusader, Saint

August 22, 2016

Saint Louis IX King of France, son of Louis VIII and Blanche of Castile, born at Poissy, 25 April, 1215; died near Tunis, 25 August, 1270. He was eleven years of age when the death of Louis VIII made him king, and nineteen when he married Marguerite of Provence by whom he had eleven children. […]

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Civitas and Urbs

August 22, 2016

Civitas and urbs, which we render as city, were not synonymous among the ancients. The civitas was the religious and political association of the families of a tribe; the urbs was the place of reunion, the domicile, and, above all, the sanctuary of this association…. Once the families, the phratries, and the tribes agreed to […]

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Etiquette and Tea Styles

August 18, 2016

Just Some of the Different Styles Of “Teas” Held, or Given, for the Enjoyment of this Popular Beverage   ·The High Tea:  In the past, “High Tea” was considered the tea of the working-class rather than the tea of the elite. This tea was a hearty affair. Meat pies, rarebit, shepherd’s pies, slices of roast, sausage, vegetables, […]

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In taming the barbarians, the Church funneled their combativeness to the service of Christendom, giving rise to Chivalry and the Crusades

August 18, 2016

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira Providence disposed that the Middle Ages should be a specially warlike age. This was not only because of the double effort that Charlemagne had to do by fighting both Saracens and barbarians, but also because of the remaining traits of barbarian mentality in Catholics themselves, which led them to unsheathe […]

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August 19 – The prince who was made bishop at age 22

August 18, 2016

St. Louis of Toulouse Bishop of Toulouse, generally represented vested in pontifical garments and holding a book and a crosier, b. at Brignoles, Provence, Feb., 1274; d. there, 19 Aug., 1297. He was the second son of Charles II of Anjou, called the Lame, King of Naples (1288- 1309), and nephew of St. Louis IX […]

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August 19 – St. John Eudes

August 18, 2016

French missionary and founder of the Eudists and of the Congregation of Our Lady of Charity; author of the liturgical worship of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary; born at Ri, France, 14 Nov., 1601; died at Caen, 19 Aug., 1680. He was a brother of the French historian, François Eudes de Nézeray. At […]

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August 20 – The Knights Templar owe him

August 18, 2016

St. Bernard of Clairvaux Born in 1090, at Fontaines, near Dijon, France; died at Clairvaux, 21 August, 1153. His parents were Tescelin, lord of Fontaines, and Aleth of Montbard, both belonging to the highest nobility of Burgundy. Bernard, the third of a family of seven children, six of whom were sons, was educated with particular […]

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August 20 – Saint Philibert of Jumièges and Recipes for Hazelnuts Named in His Honor

August 18, 2016

Saint Philibert of Jumièges (c. 608–684) was the only son of a Frankish noble, a courtier of Dagobert I. He was educated at court by Saint Ouen and entered monastic life at Rebais and was elected abbot at the age of 20. In 654, St. Philibert received a gift of land from Clovis II on […]

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August 20 – St. Oswin, King

August 18, 2016

St. Oswin King and martyr, murdered at Gilling, near Richmond, Yorkshire, England, on 20 August, 651, son of Osric, King of Deira in Britain. On the murder of his father by Cadwalla in 634, Oswin still quite young was carried away for safety into Wessex, but returned on the death of his kinsman St. Oswald, […]

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August 21 – La Vallete

August 18, 2016

Jean Parisot de La Valette Forty-eighth Grand Master of the Order of the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem; born in 1494; died in Malta, 21 Aug., 1568. He came from an old family of Southern France, several members of which had been capitouls (chief magistrates) in Toulouse. When still young he entered the Order […]

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August 21 – He was one of a network of aristocrat bishops

August 18, 2016

Saint Sidonius Apollinaris Gaius Sollius (Modestus) Apollinaris Sidonius or Saint Sidonius Apollinaris (November 5[1] of an unknown year, perhaps 430 – August, 489) was a poet, diplomat, and bishop. Sidonius is “the single most important surviving author from fifth-century Gaul” according to Eric Goldberg.[2] He was one of four fifth-to sixth-century Gallo-Roman aristocrats whose letters […]

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August 22 – The Queenship of Mary

August 18, 2016

Pope Pius XII in the Papal Encyclical Ad Coeli Reginam proposed the traditional doctrine on the Queenship of Mary and established this feast for the Universal Church. Pope Pius IX said of Mary’s Queenship: “Turning her maternal Heart toward us and dealing with the affair of our salvation, she is concerned with the whole human […]

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August 22 – The pope who preached a Crusade against the German Emperor Frederick II

August 18, 2016

Pope Gregory IX (UGOLINO, Count of Segni). Born about 1145, at Anagni in the Campagna; died 22 August, 1241, at Rome. He received his education at the Universities of Paris and Bologna. After the accession of Innocent III to the papal throne, Ugolino, who was a nephew of Innocent III, was successively appointed papal chaplain… […]

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August 22 – Venerable John Wall

August 18, 2016

Blessed John Wall Martyr, born in Lancashire, 1620; suffered near Worcester, 22 August, 1679; known at Douay and Rome as John Marsh, and when on the Mission under the aliases of Francis Johnson, Webb, and Dormore. The son of wealthy and staunch Lancashire Catholics, he was sent when very young to Douai College. He entered […]

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The City Is Formed

August 18, 2016

The tribe, like the family and the phratry, was set up to be an independent body, since it had a special cult from which strangers were excluded. Once formed, no new family could be admitted. Nor could two tribes merge into a single tribe; their religion was against it. But, just as several phratries united […]

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Queen Elizabeth II moves into Balmoral Castle 11 days late

August 15, 2016

According to The Crown Chronicles: Her Majesty has spent the past 11 nights at another house in the grounds of her Aberdeenshire retreat so that the castle could remain open to the public a little longer. The bill for the upkeep of the 1856 gothic-style castle is approximately £3 million per year. The Sovereign must […]

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August 15 – Prester John

August 15, 2016

Prester John Name of a legendary Eastern priest and king. FIRST STAGE The mythical journey to Rome of a certain Patriarch John of India in 1122, and his visit to Callistus II, cannot have been the origin of the legend. Not until much later, in a manuscript dating from the latter part of the fifteenth-century […]

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August 16 – His incorrupt right hand is treasured as the most sacred relic in Hungary

August 15, 2016

St. Stephen of Hungary First King of Hungary, born at Gran, 975; died 15 August, 1038. He was a son of the Hungarian chief Géza and was baptized, together with his father, by Archbishop St. Adalbert of Prague in 985, on which occasion he changed his heathen name Vaik (Vojk) into Stephen. In 995 he […]

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August 16 – Did he inspire the tales of King Arthur?

August 15, 2016

Saint Armel (Welsh: Arthfael, lit. “Bear-Prince”; Latin: Armagilus) He was an early 6th-century holy man in Brittany. Armel is said to have been a Breton prince, born to the wife of King Hoel while they were living in Glamorgan in Wales in the late 5th century. He founded the abbey of Plouarzel in Brittany and […]

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August 16 – Apostle of the North

August 15, 2016

St. Hyacinth Dominican, called the Apostle of the North, son of Eustachius Konski of the noble family of Odrowacz [or Odrowaz]; born 1185 at the castle of Lanka, at Kamin, in Silesia, Poland…; died 15 August, 1257, at Cracow. Feast, 16 Aug. A near relative of Saint Ceslaus, he made his studies at Cracow, Prague, […]

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August 17 – Her great beauty aroused the jealousy of the queen

August 15, 2016

St. Beatrix da Silva A Portuguese nun, died 1 September, 1490. In Portuguese she is known as Blessed Brites. She was a member of the house of Portalegre and descended from the royal family of Portugal. She accompanied the Portuguese Princess Isabel to Spain, when she married John II of Castile. There Beatrix seems to […]

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August 18 – The Empress who found the True Cross

August 15, 2016

Saint Helena (also known as Saint Helen, Helena Augusta or Helena of Constantinople) The mother of Constantine the Great, born about the middle of the third century, possibly in Drepanum (later known as Helenopolis) on the Nicomedian Gulf; died about 330. She was of humble parentage; St. Ambrose, in his “Oratio de obitu Theodosii”, referred […]

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Family, Curia or Phratry, and Tribe

August 15, 2016

The study of ancient rules of private law allowed us to glimpse, beyond so-called historic times, a period of centuries during which the family was the only form of society. This family then contained many thousands of human beings within its large frame. But within this framework human association was still too narrow; too narrow […]

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Alfred the Great: Father of the British Navy

August 11, 2016

In the fifth century the Saxons had been formidable for their power by sea; their conquests in Britain had directed their attention to other objects, and had annihilated their fleet. But Alfred now saw the necessity of opposing the Danes on their own element. In 875 he equipped a few ships, manned them with foreign […]

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The Church’s bellicose and militant character must permeate all society in the Reign of Mary

August 11, 2016

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira   Now, I take advantage to say that the Church’s Crusading and militant spirit was intimately united with the condition of noble and warrior. And the nobility gradually faded as well. And, to be precise, I believe that there will be no Reign of Mary if this spirit is not […]

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The Concept of Family in the Ancient World

August 11, 2016

One can then glimpse a long period during which men had no form of society other than the family…. Each family has its religion, its gods, its priesthood…. Each family also has its property, that is to say, its parcel of land inseparably attached to it through religion…. In short, each family has its leader, […]

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August 12 – St. Jane Frances de Chantal

August 11, 2016

Born at Dijon, France, 28 January, 1572; died at the Visitation Convent Moulins, 13 December, 1641. Her father was president of the Parliament of Burgundy, and leader of the royalist party during the League that brought about the triumph of the cause of Henry IV. In 1592 she married Baron de Chantal, and lived in […]

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August 12 – His pontificate was spent in opposing royal absolutism

August 11, 2016

Pope Blessed Innocent XI (Benedetto Odescalchi) Born at Como, 16 May, 1611; died at Rome, 11 August, 1689. He was educated by the Jesuits at Como, and studied jurisprudence at Rome and Naples. Urban VIII appointed him successively prothonotary, president of the Apostolic Camera, commissary at Ancona, administrator of Macerata, and Governor of Picena. Innocent […]

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August 13 – The Ottomans lived in fear of this Capuchin

August 11, 2016

Blessed Mark of Aviano (1631–1699) Capuchin friar. His baptismal name was Carlo Domenico Cristofori, his birthplace Aviano, a small community in the Republic of Venice (Italy). From an early age, he felt attracted to a life of devotion and martyrdom. Educated at the Jesuit College in Gorizia, at 16 he tried to reach the island […]

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August 13 – Crusader nun

August 11, 2016

Bl. Gertrude of Aldenberg Abbess of the Premonstratensian convent of Aldenberg, near Wetzlar, in the Diocese of Trier; born about 1227, died 13 August, 1297. She was the youngest of three children of Louis VI, margrave of Thuringia, and his wife St. Elizabeth of Hungary. Gertrude’s father died on his way to the Holy Land […]

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August 13 – The Pope Who Resigned

August 11, 2016

Pope St. Pontian Dates of birth and death unknown. The “Liber Pontificalis” (ed. Duchesne, I, 145) gives Rome as his native city and calls his father Calpurnius. With him begins the brief chronicle of the Roman bishops of the third century, of which the author of the Liberian Catalogue of the popes made use in […]

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August 13 – The antipope who became a saint

August 11, 2016

Hippolytus, Saints, Martyrs. I. St. Hippolytus of Rome, presbyter and antipope; date of birth unknown; died about 236. Until the publication in 1851 of the recently discovered “Philosophumena”, it was impossible to obtain any definite authentic facts concerning Hippolytus of Rome and his life from the conflicting statements about him, as follows: Eusebius says that […]

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August 14 – Founding Father

August 11, 2016

Pierre Chastellain Missionary among the Huron Indians, born at Senlis, France, in 1606; died at Quebec, 14 August, 1684. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1624 and at the age of thirty sailed from France with two future martyrs, Fathers Isaac Jogues and Charles Garnier, and the new Governor of Canada, Montmagny, the successor […]

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August 14 – St. Eusebius, Roman patrician and priest

August 11, 2016

St. Eusebius of Rome A presbyter at Rome; date of birth unknown; d. 357(?). He was a Roman patrician and priest, and is mentioned with distinction in Latin martyrologies. The ancient genuine martyrology of Usuard styles him confessor at Rome under the Arian emperor Constantius and adds that he was buried in the cemetery of […]

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August 15 – The Knights of St. John capture Rhodes and establish their sovereignty

August 11, 2016

On 15 August, 1310, under the leadership of Grand Master Foulques de Villaret, the Knights of St. John captured the island in spite of the Greek emperor, Andronicus II. The Knights of Rhodes, the successors of the Hospitallers of St. John, were distinguished from the latter in many ways. In the first place, the grand […]

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August 9 – Pope St. Victor I

August 8, 2016

Pope St. Victor I (189-198 or 199), date of birth unknown. The “Liber Pontificalis” makes him a native of Africa and gives his father the name of Felix. This authority, taking the “Liberian Catalogue” as its basis, gives the years 186-197 as the period of Victor’s episcopate. The Armenian text of the “Chronicle” of Eusebius […]

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August 10 – Defiant under torture, he inspires noble souls until today

August 8, 2016

St. Lawrence Martyr; died 10 August, 258. St. Lawrence, one of the deacons of the Roman Church, was one of the victims of the persecution of Valerian in 258, like Pope Sixtus II and many other members of the Roman clergy. At the beginning of the month of August, 258, the emperor issued an edict, […]

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August 10 – His sister founded the Conceptionists

August 8, 2016

Blessed João Mendes de Silva Better known as Amadeus of Portugal, O.F.M., (1420–1482), was a Portuguese nobleman who became first a monk, then left that life to become a friar of the Franciscan Order. Later he became a reformer of that Order, which led to his founding of a distinct branch of the Friars Minor […]

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August 11 – St. Attracta

August 8, 2016

St. Attracta (Or ST. ARAGHT). A contemporary of St. Patrick from whom she received the veil. She is known as the foundress of several churches in the Counties of Galway and Sligo, Ireland. Colgan’s account of her life is based on that written by Augustine Magraidin in the last years of fourteenth century, and abounds […]

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August 11 – As soldiers scaled the walls of the convent, she met them with ciborium in hand and put them to flight

August 8, 2016

St. Clare of Assisi Cofoundress of the Order of Poor Ladies, or Clares, and first Abbess of San Damiano; born at Assisi, 16 July, 1194; died there 11 August, 1253. She was the eldest daughter of Favorino Scifi, Count of Sasso-Rosso, the wealthy representative of an ancient Roman family, who owned a large palace in […]

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