Estella Battle

September 21, 2017

Portrait of Infante Carlos María Isidro de Borbón, Count of Molina, in the uniform of captain general.

On the evening of the same day a review was held of the troops engaged in the last battle. Colonel Auriol, in the kindest manner, gave me a first-rate mount, and I was thus able to join the staff and assist in this very interesting event.

Between five and six o’clock Don Carlos and Dona Margarita left their house in the Plaza, which is now honoured with the name of “the Palace.” Don Carlos, who was dressed in the uniform of a general, with the order of the Golden Fleece suspended to his neck, mounted a fine iron-gray charger; his wife, who is an accomplished horsewoman, rode a jet black Andulsian They were followed by the Countess Flores, who, like the Duchess, wore a plain black habit, and a scarlet boina, placed jauntily on the side of the head; Generals Dorregaray, Argonz, Larramendi, and Iturmendi, Duke de la Rocca, Brigadier Alvarez, Coude de Silva, Colonel Auriol, and a number of other officers. Through a multitude of cheering people and clouds of dust we rode through Irache and on to the lower slopes of Monte Jurra.

General Antonio Dorregaray y Dominguera

Here, in eight or nine long parallel lines, twenty-seven battalions of infantry were drawn up, with six batteries of mountain artillery on the left and a small body of cavalry in rear. General Mendiri, the newly created Count of Abarzuza, here received his King and Queen, and the brigadiers and colonels commanding regiments galloped off to take up their respective posts.

No better spot could have been selected for this review, although, being on the slope, of a mountain, where the ground is furrowed with small watercourses, half concealed by thick tufts of heather, it is not well adapted, according to English notions, for a march past. But this was no show parade of brilliant uniforms laced with gold and silver and shining helmets and waving feathers: 18,000 men, engaged in a sanguinary and, unfortunately, fratricidal war, were here drawn up, after one of the most important battles of the campaign, to be inspected by those whom they regard as their rightful King and Queen, whatever the rest of Europe may say to the contrary. With the exception of some of the Navarrese regiments, which were clothed in coarse grey cotton tunics and trousers, the latter with a scarlet stripe, few of the regiments could pretend to any uniform, and consequently, perhaps, they might have excited some derision in Hyde Park or at Longchamps, on the Prater or at Potsdam. But no one who had seen them on the preceding Saturday, tenaciously defending their positions, and making charge after charge with the bayonet upon the well-trained troops who more than doubled them in numbers, could feel anything but admiration for their courage and gallantry.

View of Estella

There were reasons, too, why no more appropriate place could have been selected for this review, notwithstanding that the authorities at the Horse Guards would be inexpressibly shocked if any one were rash enough to suggest a similar parade ground for a review-and one might be found in the Highlands of Scotland. Here, at the food of Monte Jurra, which not long before had been the scene of a great battle, the view embraced not only Estella and its surrounding rock peaks, but also the two extreme points of the recent battlefield – Villatuerta, where it commenced on the 25th of June, and Pena-Muro, where it finished on the 27th. As far as the eye could reach were ranges of mountains, contrasting, the soft rounded lines and hazy beauty in which Claude de Lorraine so delighted with the perpendicular cliffs and bare rugged rocks preferred by Salvator Rosa. In the foreground was the magnificent monastery of Irache, backed by fruitful gardens, standing on a terrace above the valley watered by the little river Arga, and which was then rich with yellow grain already beginning to fall before the sickle. Over its highest tower was floating the white flag crossed with red, the only object which on that seemed to recall the full harvest that death was reaping in the internecine struggle which was and still is devastating the northern provinces of beautiful Spain.

Portrait of Infanta Maria Francisca of Portugal, Countess of Molina.

As Don Carlos and the Duchess rode down the lines, followed by the staff, each regiment in succession presented arms, and the bands played the Royal March. Each battalion, when it had been inspected, gave a ringing cheer of “Viva el Rey! Viva la Reina de Espana!” Occasionally Don Carlos stopped to speak to officers whose regiments had specially distinguished themselves.

But not the least interesting and picturesque feature of the review was the crowd of people who had gathered from Estella and all the countryside. There were no brilliant equipages, or Amazons with attendant cavaliers, all known to the world of fashion; but there were thousands  of peasants—elderly men and women who were actors in the last Carlist war; men astride mules, with their wives and daughters seated behind them on the crupper; parish priests; labourers who had left the fields and came cantering up, two at a time, on the same horse or mule, and hundreds of pretty girls and children. There were few young men in the crowd; these were mostly in the ranks. As their King and Queen  rode from line to line, and cantered round  the flanks of the battalions, this loyal multitude moved too, and they never lost an opportunity to get as close to them as possible, whilst cheers rang through the air and were echoed back by the rocks of Monte Jurra, and fans and handkerchiefs were waved in the wildest manner. People had come from the villages round Pampeluna, and even from Elizondo and places sixty or seventy miles distant, simply to see their acknowledged sovereigns.

Carlist Army

As a tribute of gallantry to the Dona Margarita, every man in her own Navarrese regiment wore in his boina a bunch of the flower whose name she bears. Another noticeable fact was that he boina was the only headdress worn. It is common to the whole army, from Don Carlos in his general’s uniform to the private soldier in his rough peasant’s clothes and sandals, with the badge of the Sacred Heart  embroidered on his left breast.

It was nearly eight o’clock before the inspection was concluded. Don Carlos and his wife, followed by the staff, then place themselves in a convenient position near the right of the first line, and the whole army marched past. The modest force of artillery came first,  then infantry in fours; and as soon as they had passed the saluting point they wheeled and took the direction of their respective quarters, which in most cases, meant the mountainside, under open canopy of heaven. Each company cheered as it passed, and as they moved down the hill they could be heard singing hymns to the Virgin.

Among the Carlists, by John Furley (London: Samuel Tinsley, 1876)  P. 276-280

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 593

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Gabriel Garcia Moreno

Quito, July 17, 1875

Most Holy Father,

For some time now I have intensely wished to write to Your Holiness again; but I have been kept from doing so for fear of taking your time, which is too precious and necessary for the rule of the Catholic world. Notwithstanding this, today I must overcome this fear to implore your apostolic blessing, as I have been reelected, undeservingly, to govern this Catholic Republic for six years more. Although the new term will not begin until August 30, and I will not be able to serve Your Holiness with an official notification of my reelection until I take the constitutional oath on that day, I am conveying this to Your Holiness in advance in order to obtain from Heaven strength and lights, which I need more than anyone for being faithful to our Redeemer and loyal and obedient to His infallible Vicar. Now that the [Masonic] lodges of the neighboring countries, instigated by those of Germany, vomit against me atrocious insults and horrible calumnies of all kinds, I need Divine protection more than ever to live and die in the defense of our holy Religion and of this small republic that God has willed that I continue governing. Most Holy Father, what great fortune it is for me to be hated and persecuted for the sake of our Divine Redeemer! and what great joy it would be for me if your blessing obtained from Heaven that I shed my blood for Him who, being God, willed to shed His on the Cross for us! (*)

Consecration of Ecuador to the Sacred Heart

I take advantage of this occasion to ask Your Holiness for two important graces:

The first is that Your Holiness deign instruct His Eminence Cardinal Franchi, the protector of the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Apparition, whose general director Sr. Emilia Julien resides in Marseilles, to authorize the coming to Quito of ten of the said sisters at the expense of the government of Ecuador, so they may take charge of the care and direction of the hospice for the poor and the hospital for mongoloids in this capital.

Saint Emily de Vialar founded the missionary congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Apparition.

The second, in a word, is to obtain from your paternal goodness that the relics of Blessed Claver [now Saint Peter Claver], at present forsaken—not to say despised—in Cartagena, Colombia, be brought to the Jesuit school in Quito. The government of Ecuador will finance a translation of the relics with due pomp and veneration. Your Holiness beatified this illustrious apostle of Catholic charity, and I believe that you will not consent to his venerable relics remaining in a place where nobody manifests appreciation or respect for them. Ecuador, weak and poor though it is, neither seeks nor wishes any other protection than God’s; this is why it wants to have a new advocate in Heaven.

Gabriel Gregorio Fernando José María García y Moreno y Morán de Buitrón, President of Ecuador.

I can do no less than express to Your Holiness the grief caused us by the departure of your worthy and virtuous delegate, His Excellency Seraphim Vannutelli; however, we are consoled by the hope that Your Holiness will deign send us another one capable of replacing him.

I prostrate myself at the feet of Your Holiness to implore again your Apostolic blessing for this Catholic Republic, for my family, and for this your very humble, obedient, and loving son,

G. Garcia Moreno

Taken from “Cartas de Garcia Moreno”, Wilfrido Loor, La Prensa Católica, Quito-Ecuador.

(*) In fact, on August 6 of that same year, Garcia Moreno was slain in front of the Governmental Palace. As he was being killed, his murderer shouted: “Die Jesuit!” (Referring to the support given by Garcia Moreno to that order.) To what he made answer: “Garcia Moreno dies, but God does not die.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Thomas of Villanova

Saint Thomas of Villanova

Saint Thomas of Villanova

Educator, philanthropist, born at Fuentellana, Spain, 1488; died at Valencia, 8 September, 1555. Son of Aloazo Tomas Garcia and Lucia Martínez Castellanos, the saint was brought up in the practices of religion and charity. Every Friday his father was wont to give in alms all the meal he earned at the mill, besides his usual daily dole of bread. On great feast-days he added wood, wine, and money; while to poor farmers he loaned money and seed. On the death of her husband, Lucia continued the usual alms, and supplied indigent maidens in the neighbourhood with clothing and money. When sixteen tears old, Thomas entered the University of Alcalá, where, after proceeding master of arts and licentiate in theology, he filled the chair (1514) of arts, logic, and philosophy. Among his auditors were the famed scholars Ferdinand de Encina and Dominic Soto. With Alcala…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

September 22 – Saint Emmeram

September 21, 2017

Saint Emmeram

Martydom of Saint Emmeram (Salzburg) from the Cathedral Treasury and Diocese Museum Eichstätt.

Martydom of Saint Emmeram (Salzburg) from the Cathedral Treasury and Diocese Museum Eichstätt.

Bishop of Poitiers and missionary to Bavaria, born at Poitiers in the first half of the seventh century; martyred at Ascheim (Bavaria) towards the end of the same century. Of a noble family of Aquitaine, he received a good education and was ordained priest. According to some authors Emmeram occupied the See of Poitiers, but this cannot be verified, for his name does not appear among the Bishops of Poitiers. He probably held the see for a short time, from the death of Dido (date unknown) to the episcopate of Ansoaldus (674). Having heard that the inhabitants of Bavaria were still idolaters, he determined to carry the light of the Faith to them. Ascending the Loire, crossing the Black Forest, and going down the Danube, he reached Ratisbon in a region then governed by the Duke Theodo. For three years he labored in Bavaria, preaching and converting the people, acquiring also a renown for holiness.

Subscription14.1He then turned his steps towards Rome, to visit the tombs of Sts. Peter and Paul, but after a five days’ journey, at a place now called Kleinhelfendorf, south of Munich, he was set upon by envoys of the Duke of Bavaria who tortured him cruelly. He died shortly afterwards at Ascheim, about fifteen miles distant. The cause of this attack and the circumstances attending his death are not known. According to the legend related by Aribo, Bishop of Freising, the first to write a life of St. Emmeram, Ota, daughter of the Duke of Bavaria, who had been seduced by Sigipaldus, an important personage of her father’s court, fearing her father’s wrath, confessed her fault to the bishop. Moved with compassion, he advised her to name himself, whom every one respected, as her seducer, and it was in consequence of this accusation that Theodo ordered him to be followed and put to death. The improbability of the tale, the details of the saint’s martyrdom, which are certainly untrue, and the fantastic account of the prodigies attending his death show that the writer, infected by the pious mania of his time, simply added to the facts imaginary details supposed to redound to the glory of the martyr.

Saint EmmeramAll that is known as to the date of the saint’s death is that it took place on September 22, some time before St. Rupert’s arrival in Bavaria (696). At Kleinhelfendorf, where he was tortured, there stands today a chapel of St. Emmeram, and at Ascheim, where he died, is also a martyr’s chapel built in his honor. His remains were removed to Ratisbon and interred in the church of St. George, from which they were transferred about the middle of the eighth century by Bishop Gawibaldus to a church dedicated to the saint. This church having been destroyed by fire in 1642, the saint’s body was found under the altar in 1645 and was encased in a magnificent reliquary. The relics, which were canonically recognized by Bishop Ignaz de Senestrez in 1833, are exposed for the veneration of the faithful every year on September 22. It is impossible to prove that Emmeram occupied the See of Ratisbon, for the official episcopal list begins with the above-mentioned Gawibaldus, who was consecrated by St. Boniface in 739 and died in 764.

LEON CLUGNET (Catholic Encyclopdia)

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Adamnan of Ireland, Abbot

St Adamnan

St Adamnan

He was the eighth in descent from the great Nial, king of Ireland, and from Conal the Great, ancestor of St. Columbkille. His parents were eminent for their rank and virtue. He was born in the year 626, at Rathboth, (1) now called Raphoe, in the county of Donegal, and embraced a monastic life with great humility and fervour, in the monastery which had been founded there by his kinsman St. Columb. Afterwards following the steps of his holy kinsman, he left Ireland, and retired to the celebrated monastery of Hij, of which he became fifth abbot…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Fr. François Vaillant de Gueslis

Jesuit missionary, born at Orleans, 20 July, 1646; died at Moulins, 24 Sept., 1718. He entered the Society of Jesus, 10 Nov., 1665; came to Canada in 1670; and was ordained priest at Quebec, 1 Dec., 1675. He first evangelized the Mohawks (1679-84). In the beginning of 1688 he was chosen by the Canadian authorities as ambassador to Thomas Dongan, Governor of New York. He was also the first missionary to work among the Indians at Detroit; but he remained only a few months, not entering into the plans of Sieur de Lamothe Cadillac…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Pope Innocent II

(Gregorio Papereschi)

Elected 14 Feb., 1130; died 24 Sept., 1143. He was a native of Rome and belonged to the ancient family of the Guidoni. His father’s name is given as John.

Pope Innocent IIThe youthful Gregory became canon of the Lateran and later Abbot of Sts. Nicholas and Primitivus. He was made Cardinal-Deacon of the Title of S. Angelo by Paschal II, and as such shared the exile of Gelasius II in France, together with his later rival, the Cardinal-Deacon Pierleone. Under Callistus II Gregory was sent to Germany (1119) with the legate Lambert, Cardinal-Bishop of Ostia. Both were engaged in drawing up the Concordat of Worms in 1122. In the following year he was sent to France…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Hermann Contractus

(Herimanus Augiensis, Hermann von Reichenau).

Chronicler, mathematician, and poet; born 18 February, 1013, at Altshausen (Swabia); died on the island of Reichenau, Lake Constance, 21 September, 1054.

Bl. Hermann of Reichenau

Bl. Hermann of Reichenau

He was the son of Count Wolverad II von Altshausen. Being a cripple from birth (hence the surname Contractus) he was powerless to move without assistance, and it was only by the greatest effort that he was able to read and write; but he was so highly gifted intellectually, that when he was but seven years of age his parents confided him to the learned Abbot Berno, on the island of Reichenau. Here he took the monastic vows in 1043, and probably spent his entire life. His iron will overcame all obstacles, and it was not long before his brilliant attainments made him a shining light in the most diversified branches of learning, including, besides theology, mathematics, astronomy, music, the Latin, Greek, and Arabic tongues. Students soon flocked to him from all parts, attracted not only by the fame of his scholarship, but also by his monastic virtue and his lovable personality. We are indebted to him chiefly for a chronicle of the most important events from the birth of Christ to his day. It is the earliest of the medieval universal chronicles now extant, and was compiled from numerous sources, being a monument to his great industry as well as to his extraordinary erudition and strict regard for accuracy. While it is not improbable that this work was based on a previous state chronicle of Swabia, since lost (called “Chronicum Universale Suevicum”, or “Epitome Sangallensis”), it has nevertheless a significance entirely its own. But the full measure of his genius appears from the objectivity and clearness with which he wrote the history of his own time, the materials of which were accessible to him only by means of verbal tradition.

An artistic rendering of "Herman the Lame" as he is sometimes called.

An artistic rendering of “Herman the Lame” as he is sometimes called.

He also wrote mathematico-astronomical works. Of his poems the most successful was the “De octo vitiis principalibus”, which he addressed to nuns, and in which he gave proof of uncommon skill in the handling of different kinds of metres, as well as in the charm with which he contrived to blend earnestness with a happy mirth. He composed religious hymns, and is not infrequently credited with the authorship of the “Alma Redemptoris Mater“, and the “Salve Regina“. Finally, it may be mentioned that Hermann constructed astronomical and musical instruments.

He was beatified in 1863.

PATRICIUS SCHLAGER (Catholic Encyclopedia)

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Albert of Jerusalem

St AlbertPatriarch of Jerusalem, one of the conspicuous ecclesiastics in the troubles between the Holy See and Federick Barbarossa; date of birth uncertain; died 14 September, 1215.

He was in fact asked by both Pope and Emperor to act as umpire in their dispute and, as a reward, was made Prince of the Empire. He was born in the diocese of Parma, became a canon regular in the Monastery of Mortara in the Milanese, and after being Bishop of Bobbio, for a short time, was translated to the see of Vercelli. Subscription8 This was about 1184.  At that time the Latins occupied Jerusalem and, the Patriarchate falling vacant, Albert was implored by the Christians of Palestine to accept the see. As it implied persecution and a prospect of martyrdom, he accepted, and was appointed by Innocent III, who at the same time made him Papal Legate. His sanctity procured him the veneration of even the Muslims. It was while here that he undertook a work with which his name is particularly and peculiarly associated. In Palestine, at that time, the hermits of Mount Carmel lived in separate cells. One of their number gathered them into a community, and in 1209 their superior, Brocard, requested the Patriarch, though not a Carmelite, to draw up a rule for them. He assented, and legislated in the most rigorous fashion, prescribing perpetual abstinence from flesh, protracted fasts, long silence, and extreme seclusion. It was so severe that mitigations had to be introduced by Innocent IV in 1246.

St. Albert Presents the Rule to the Carmelites, Painting by Pietro Lorenzetti

St. Albert Presents the Rule to the Carmelites, Painting by Pietro Lorenzetti

The end of this great prelate was most tragic. Summoned by Innocent III to take part in the General Council of the Lateran, in 1215, he was assassinated before he left Palestine, while taking part in a procession, on the feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross.

(cfr. Catholic Encyclopedia)

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

September 25 – St. Aunarius

September 21, 2017

St. Aunarius

Statue of St. Austremonius, Bishop of Auvergne. Church Saint Austremonius of Issoire, Auvergne, France.

Statue of St. Austremonius, Bishop of Auvergne. Church Saint Austremonius of Issoire, Auvergne, France.

(Or Aunacharius).

Bishop of Auxerre in France, born 573, died 603. Being of noble birth, he was brought up in the royal court, but evinced a desire to enter the clerical state, was ordained priest by St. Syagrius of Autum, and eventually was made Bishop of Auxerre. His administration is noted for certain important disciplinary measures that throw light on the religious and moral life of the Merovingian times. He caused solemn litanies to be said daily in the chief centres of population, by rotation, and on the first day of each month in the larger towns and monasteries.

Scenes from the life of St. Austremonius: the saint blessing.

Scenes from the life of St. Austremonius: the saint blessing.

He enforced a regular daily attendance at the Divine Office on the part both of regular and secular clergy. He held (681 or 585) an important synod of four bishops, seven abbots, thirty-five priests, and four deacons for the restoration of ecclesiastical discipline and the suppression of popular pagan superstitions, and caused the lives of his predecessors Amator and Germanus to be written. He was buried at Auxerre, where he has always been held in veneration. His remains were later enclosed in a golden chest, but were partially dispersed by the Huguenots in 1567. A portion, however, was placed in the hollow pillar of a crypt, and saved. His feast is celebrated 25 September.

Thomas J. Shahan (Catholic Encyclopedia)

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Mary of Modena in her court dress in 1680, painted by Sir Godfrey Kneller.

Mary of Modena in her court dress in 1680, painted by Sir Godfrey Kneller.

Another voice, the most august of all, was now to break silence. The arguments of Kings, Cardinals, Ambassadors, and of her own family had failed to shake the purpose or convince the mind of the young Princess. Moved by a desire to benefit the Catholics of England, and as much perhaps by the solicitations of the Courts of England and France as by the prompting of his own conviction, Clement X writes a brief to Mary Beatrice, the only instance, we believe, of a Sovereign Pontiff directly addressing a Princess of fifteen years of age. It is, of course, in Latin, but that, as we know, presented no difficulty to her…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Blessed Mary de Cervellione

(or De Cervello)

Popularly styled “de Socos” (of Help) Saint, born about 1230 at Barcelona; died there 19 September, 1290. She was a daughter of a Spanish nobleman named William de Cervellon. One day she heard a sermon preached by Blessed Bernard de Corbarie, the superior of the Brotherhood of Our Lady of Ransom at Barcelona, and was so deeply affected by his pleading for the Christian slaves and captives in the hands of the Turks that she resolved to do all in her power for their alleviation. In 1265 she joined a little community of pious women who lived near the monastery of the Mercedarians and spent their lives in prayer and good works under the direction of Blessed Bernard de Corbarie…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Saint Alonso de Orozco Mena

Alphonsus de Orozco was born in Oropesa, Province of Toledo, Spain, on the 17th of October 1500, where his father was governor of the local castle. He began his studies in the nearby Talavera de la Reina and for three years he was a choir boy in the Cathedral of Toledo, where he made progress in the study of music. At the age of fourteen his parents sent him to the University of Salamanca, where an elder brother was already studying.

During the Lenten sermons preached by Thomas of Villanova in 1520, on the psalm “In exitu Israel de Aegipto”, his vocation to the religious life was brought to maturity and a little later, attracted by the religious atmosphere of the Friary of Saint Augustine, he entered that community, and there made his profession of vows at the hands of Saint Thomas of Villanova…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Pope St. Agapetus I

(Also AGAPITUS.)

Reigned 535-536. Date of birth uncertain; died 22 April, 536. He was the son of Gordianus, a Roman priest who had been slain during the riots in the days of Pope Symmachus.

Pope st. Agapetus IHis first official act was to burn in the presence of the assembled clergy the anathema which Boniface II had pronounced against the latter’s rival Dioscurus and had ordered to be preserved in the Roman archives. He confirmed the decrees of the council held at Carthage, after the liberation of Africa from the Vandal yoke, according to which converts from Arianism were declared ineligible to Holy Orders and those already ordained were merely admitted to lay communion. He accepted an appeal from Contumeliosus, Bishop of Riez, whom a council at Marseilles had condemned for immorality, and he ordered St. Caesarius of Aries to grant the accused a new trial before papal delegates…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Bl. Thomas Johnson

newgate cell

Newgate cell

Carthusian martyr, died in Newgate gaol, London, 20 September, 1537. On 18 May, 1537, the twenty choir monks and eighteen brothers remaining in the London Charterhouse were required to take the Oath of Supremacy. Of these choir monks Thomas Johnson, Richard Bere, Thomas Green (priests), and John Davy (deacon) refused; and of the brothers Robert Salt, William Greenwood, Thomas Redyng, Thommas Scryven, Walter Pierson, and William Horne. On 29 May all were sent to Newgate, where they were chained standing and with their hands tied behind them to posts in the prison, and so left to die of starvation…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

September 21 – Pope Conon

September 18, 2017

Pope Conon

Date of birth unknown; died, after a long illness, 21 September, 687.

Pope_CononThe son, seemingly, of an officer in the Thracesian troop, he was educated in Sicily and ordained priest at Rome. His age, venerable appearance, and simple character caused the clergy and soldiery of Rome, who were in disagreement, to put aside their respective candidates and to elect him as pope. He was consecrated (21 October, 686) after notice of his election had been sent to the Exarch of Ravenna, or after it had been confirmed by him. He received the Irish missionaries, St. Kilian and his companions, consecrated Kilian bishop, and commissioned him and the others to preach the Faith in Franconia. (Vita S. Kiliani, in Canisius, Lect. Antiquæ, III, 175-180.) He was in favour with the savage Emperor Justinian II who informed him that he had recovered the Acts of the Sixth General Council, by which, he wrote, it was his intention to abide. Justinian also remitted certain taxes and dues owing to the imperial exchequer from several papal patrimonies.

Acta SS., 8 July, II, 612 sq.; DUCHESNE ed., Liber Pontificalis, I, 368 sq.; MANN, Lives of the Popes, I, pt. II, 72 sq.

Horace K. Mann (Catholic Encyclopedia)

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Gabriel Malagrida

A Jesuit missionary to Brazil, born 18 September or 6 December, 1689, at Menaggio, in Italy; died 21 September, 1761, at Lisbon. He entered the Jesuit order at Genoa in 1711. He set out from Lisbon in 1721 and arrived on the Island of Maranhào towards the end of the same year. Thence he proceeded to Brazil, where for twenty-eight years he underwent numerous hardships in the Christianization of the natives. In 1749 he was sent to Lisbon, where he was received with great honours by the aged King John V. In 1751 he returned to Brazil, but was recalled to Lisbon in 1753 upon the request of the queen dowager, Marianna of Austria, mother of Joseph, who had succeeded to the throne upon the death of his father, John V.

Gabriel_MalagridaThe great influence which he exerted at the Court of Lisbon was a thorn in the side of Pombal, the prime minister. By intrigues and calumnies he induced the young king, Joseph I, to banish Malagrida to Setubal (November, 1756) and to remove all the Jesuits from the Court. An attempt upon the life of the royal chamberlain, Teixeira, during which the king was accidentally wounded, was amplified by Pombal into a conspiracy headed by Malagrida and other Jesuits. Without proof, Malagrida was declared guilty of high treason, but, being a priest, he could not be executed without the consent of the Inquisition. Meanwhile the officials of the Inquisition, who were friendly towards Malagrida, were replaced by tools of Pombal, who condemned him as a heretic and visionary, whereupon he was strangled at an auto-da-fé, and his body burnt. The accusation of heresy is based on two visionary treatises which he is said to have written while in prison. His authorship of these treatises has never been proved, and they contain such ridiculous statements that, if he wrote them, he must previously have lost his reason in the horrors of his two and a half years’ imprisonment. That he was not guilty of any conspiracy against the king is admitted even by the enemies of the Jesuits. A monument in his honour was erected in 1887 in the parochial church of Menaggio.

The execution of Fr. Gabriel Malagrida.

The execution of Fr. Gabriel Malagrida.

Mury, Histoire de Gabriel Malagrida (Paris, 1884; 2nd ed., Strasburg, 1899; Ger. trans., Salzburg, 1890); Un monumento al P. Malagrida in La Civilità Cattolica, IX, series XIII (Rome, 1888), 30-43, 414-30, 658-79; Sommervogel, Bibliothèque de la Compagnie de Jésus, V (Brussels, 1894), 394-95; Butina, Vida de Malagrida (Barcelona, 1886).

MICHAEL OTT (Catholic Encyclopedia)

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Churchill

September 14, 2017

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

Sr. Winston Churchill

In his ascension, Churchill went straight to the zenith. In him, the most diverse forms of intelligence, political cleverness and courage gradually appeared and shone; and they did so more and more, as the contingencies of the fight demanded. When the war was over, Churchill was the most famous of the winners.

Conference of the Big Three at Yalta, the final plans for the defeat of Germany. Here the “Big Three” sit on the patio together, Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Premier Josef Stalin. February 1945.

Allied propaganda often presented him alongside the other two – Roosevelt and Stalin – as if trying to level them. But that effort was futile and even counterproductive. Framed between the old Yankee president with common looks and an unimpressive, standard smile on one side, and on the other side the sinister Soviet dictator under whose hirsute eyebrows sparked two ignorant and threatening eyes, and under whose thick mustache were lips better suited to slander and drink than to speak, Churchill’s extremely expressive physiognomy stood out in a way that one would almost call splendid.

HM Queen Elizabeth II is greeted by Sir Winston Churchill on April 4, 1955

Obviously, being very expressive is not enough for a person to shine. He also needs to express something worthwhile. The old English lion did so abundantly. His bald head reflected a vigorous and subtle diplomatic thought. His eyes – there would be so much to say about them! – expressed successively fascinating depths of observation, reflection, humor and aristocratic gentleness. His broad muscled cheeks lost nothing of their vigor with age. They looked like two facial buttresses, vigorously framing his highly intellectualized physiognomy. And they gave his face something that displayed an almost perpetual resoluteness and stability, an expressive symbol of the centuries-old strength of the English monarchy. His lips, thin and uncertain in their contour, seemed to accompany the movement of his eyes and thus were always ready to open up to utter an ironic saying, a slogan, to make a monumental speech … or smoke a cigar.

Sir Winston Churchill, with his son Randolf and grandson in ceremonial robes. Churchill was related to John Howland, one of the passengers on the Mayflower and his descendants have been associated with the Boston Brahmins. From his marriage to Elizabeth Tilley they founded one of the three largest progenies of Mayflower decedents.

I feel I would not be describing Churchill entirely if I failed to mention another feature. An authentic member of the English gentry, he was properly speaking adorned with the manly charm of a high-class aristocrat. In Churchill came together the scintillations of university culture, journalistic talent, parliamentary oratory, and military glory, in addition to a disconcertingly positive and active attitude typical of American businessmen from the “belle-époque”. In fact, his mother was a Yankee, daughter of a vigorous self-made man.

Jennie Jerome in the 1880s, later to be Lady Randolph Churchill, Mother of Sir Winston Churchill.

Conversing once about Churchill with Archduke Otto of Habsburg, he had this lucid comment: It is in the order of things, even among vegetables, that gigantic specimens should appear from time to time in this or that variety. They are phenomena of nature. Churchill was one of them.

 

Excerpts from an article in Folha de S. Paulo, December 19, 1977. Without revision’s Author.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 2 comments }

Queen and Patroness of Alaska

September 14, 2017

Bishop Joseph Raphael Crimont, S.J.

Bishop Joseph Raphael Crimont, S.J. (1858-1945), Bishop of Alaska, was from France and he knew members of St. Therese of the Child Jesus’ family. He said Mass in the Infirmary where St. Therese had died twenty-eight years before. At the Mass the Little Flower’s three sisters received Communion from the Bishop. Earlier in the summer the Bishop first met Mother Agnes (Martin) when they began a lasting friendship. Bishop Crimont knew of St. Therese’s devotion to the missions while she was living and he placed the entire Alaskan mission under her protection five years prior to her canonization.

While Bishop Crimont was in Rome for St. Therese’s canonization on May 17, 1925, the Sacred Congregation decreed St. Therese the Queen and Patroness of Alaska, a title the Bishop had offered her five years earlier. From this time on his devotion to the Little Flower became one of the great influences of his life. Beginning with the reading of “Histoire d’un Ame,” many things contributed to feed the devotion: blessings obtained by himself, miracles told by others, important favors received by Father Ruppert.

Situated on 46 acres, the Shrine of St. Therese of Lisieux overlooks the Lynn Canal in Juneau, Alaska. The first mass was held in 1941. Photo by gillfoto.

After the visit to Lisieux, the Bishop distributed many relics of the Little Flower and did much to spread devotion to her. Application of a relic to a Sister Superior of Douglas brought immediate cure of a serious illness. An insane woman in Juneau when shown a picture of the Little Flower fell asleep the first time in over a week. Her cure was also immediate and permanent.

Dogsled Apostles by A. H. Savege

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 592

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Catherine of Genoa

(also known as Caterina Fieschi Adorno.)

Born at Genoa in 1447, died at the same place 15 September, 1510. The life of St. Catherine of Genoa may be more properly described as a state than as a life in the ordinary sense. When about twenty-six years old she became the subject of one of the most extraordinary operations of God in the human soul of which we have record, the result being a marvellous inward condition that lasted till her death. In this state, she received wonderful revelations, of which she spoke at times to those around her, but which are mainly embodied in her two celebrated works: the “Dialogues of the Soul and Body”, and the “Treatise on Purgatory”. Her modern biographies, chiefly translations or adaptations of an old Italian one which is itself founded on “Memoirs” drawn up by the saint’s own confessor and a friend, mingle what facts they give of her outward life with accounts of her supernatural state and “doctrine”, regardless of sequence, and in an almost casual fashion that makes them entirely subservient to her psychological history…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

September 15 – Grandmother of Good King Wenceslaus

September 14, 2017

St. Ludmilla Wife of Boriwoi, the first Christian Duke of Bohemia, born at Mielnik, circa 860; died at Tetin, near Beraun, 15 September, 921. She and her husband were baptized, probably by St. Methodius, in 871. Pagan fanatics drove them from their country, but they were soon recalled, and after reigning seven more years they […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 16 – The pope who exacted tribute from the Mohammedan ruler of Tunis

September 14, 2017

Pope Blessed Victor III Born in 1026 or 1027 of a non-regnant branch of the Lombard dukes of Benevento; died in Rome, 16 Sept., 1087. Being an only son his desire to embrace the monastic state was strenuously opposed by both his parents. After his father’s death in battle with the Normans, 1047, he fled […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 16 – St. Cyprian of Carthage

September 14, 2017

St. Cyprian of Carthage (Thaschus Cæcilius Cyprianus). Bishop and martyr. Of the date of the saint’s birth and of his early life nothing is known. At the time of his conversion to Christianity he had, perhaps, passed middle life. He was famous as an orator and pleader, had considerable wealth, and held, no doubt, a […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 17 – Stigmata of St. Francis of Assisi

September 14, 2017

Early in August, 1224, Francis retired with three companions to “that rugged rock ‘twixt Tiber and Arno”, as Dante called La Verna, there to keep a forty days fast in preparation for Michaelmas. During this retreat the sufferings of Christ became more than ever the burden of his meditations; into few souls, perhaps, had the […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 17 – St. Peter of Arbues

September 14, 2017

(Correctly, PETER ARBUES). Born in 1441 (or 1442); died 17 Sept., 1485. His father, a nobleman, was Antonio Arbues, and his mother’s name was Sancia Ruiz. He studied philosophy, probably at Huesca, but later went to Bologna, where in the Spanish college of St. Clement he was regarded as a model of learning and piety, […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 17 – Noble calm in all controversy, even when correcting the pope

September 14, 2017

St. Robert Francis Romulus Bellarmine (Also, “Bellarmino”). A distinguished Jesuit theologian, writer, and cardinal, born at Montepulciano, 4 October, 1542; died 17 September, 1621. His father was Vincenzo Bellarmino, his mother Cinthia Cervini, sister of Cardinal Marcello Cervini, afterwards Pope Marcellus II. He was brought up at the newly founded Jesuit college in his native […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 17 – Greatly venerated even during her life

September 14, 2017

St. Hildegard Born at Böckelheim on the Nahe, 1098; died on the Rupertsberg near Bingen, 1179; feast 17 September. The family name is unknown of this great seeress and prophetess, called the Sibyl of the Rhine. The early biographers give the first names of her parents as Hildebert and Mechtildis (or Mathilda), speak of their […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 18 – The first time US Congress went to Mass

September 14, 2017

Phillippe-Charles-Jean-Baptiste-Tronson Du Coudray Soldier, born at Reims, France, 8 September, 1738; died at Philadelphia, U.S.A., 11 September, 1777. He was educated for the army and showed great merit as an engineer. He was adjutant­ general of artillery and considered one of the best military experts in France when, in 1776, he volunteered to go to […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 12 – The Holy Name of the Virgin Mary; in thanksgiving for the victory over the Turks at Vienna

September 11, 2017

The Festival of the Holy Name of the Virgin Mary Pope Innocent XI extended this feast to the universal Church as a solemn thanksgiving for the relief of Vienna, when it was besieged by the Turks in 1683. The Turks had formerly laid siege to Vienna, under Solyman the Magnificent, in 1529, in the reign […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Video – Redefeating the Turks: the Battle of Vienna, September 12, 1683

September 11, 2017

Before he set out, Sobieski had sent a letter to Innocent XI, in which he wrote: “When the good of the Church and Christianity is concerned I shed my blood to the last drop, together with the whole kingdom. Since my kingdom and I are two bulwarks of Christianity”. To commemorate Sobieski’s victory Pope Innocent […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 12 – Simon de Montfort Crushes the Albigensians at Muret

September 11, 2017

At the Battle of Muret on 12 September 1213 the Crusading army of Simon IV de Montfort defeated the Catharist, Aragonese and Catalan forces of Peter II of Aragon, at Muret near Toulouse. Simon IV de Montfort was the leader of the Albigensian Crusade to destroy the Cathar heresy and incidentally to join the Languedoc […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 13 – He had a mouth of gold

September 11, 2017

St. John Chrysostom (Chrysostomos, “golden-mouthed” so called on account of his eloquence). Doctor of the Church, born at Antioch, c. 347; died at Commana in Pontus, 14 September, 407. John — whose surname “Chrysostom” occurs for the first time in the “Constitution” of Pope Vigilius (cf. P.L., LX, 217) in the year 553 — is […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 14 – His gallant defeat saved Canada from the French Revolution

September 11, 2017

Marquis de Louis-Joseph Montcalm-Gozon A French general, born 28 Feb., 1712, at Candiac, of Louis-Daniel and Marie-Thérèse de Lauris; died at Quebec 14 Sept., 1759. He was descended from Gozon, Grand Master of Rhodes of legendary fame, The warlike spirit of his ancestors had given rise to the saying: “War is the tomb of the […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 14 – Formerly a sign of abject disgrace, it now adorns even crowns and crests

September 11, 2017

The Cross could not be decently mentioned amongst Romans, who looked upon it as an unlucky omen, and as Cicero says, not to be named by a freeman. However, the Emperor Constantine attributed his victory in the Quintian fields, near the bridge Milvius, to the Cross of the Christians, the inscription of which he caused […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are expecting their third child

September 7, 2017

According to the Royal Household: Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are very pleased to announce that The Duchess of Cambridge is expecting their third child. The Queen and members of both families are delighted with the news. As with her previous two pregnancies, The Duchess is suffering from Hyperemesis Gravidarum. Her […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Grand Duke Henri Commemorates Strike of 1942

September 7, 2017

According to Luxarazzi: On August 31st, Grand Duke Henri was in Wiltz to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the strike that began on that day in 1942. This event, which reflected the increasing unrest among Luxembourgers facing Nazi oppression and enforced conscription, started in Wiltz and resulted in people refusing to work. The strike spread […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Churchill: Monarchy would have prevented Hitler

September 7, 2017

‘Personally, having lived through all these European disturbances and studied carefully their causes, I am of the opinion that if the Allies at the peace table at Versailles had not imagined that the sweeping away of long-established dynasties was a form of progress, and if they had allowed a Hohenzollern, a Wittelsbach, and a Habsburg […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Saint Bernard’s spirit of chivalry

September 7, 2017

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira St. Bernard was a Trappist monk. He founded a religious Order that was a branch of the Order of St. Benedict destined to practice greater austerity and have a tougher life than required by the toughest rules of the monks of his time.  He believed – how rightly! – that […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 8 – The Davidic ancestry of Mary

September 7, 2017

As we celebrate the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, let us recall her Davidic ancestry. St. Luke (2:4) says that St. Joseph went from Nazareth to Bethlehem to be enrolled, “because he was of the house and family of David”. As if to exclude all doubt concerning the Davidic descent of Mary, the Evangelist […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 8 – He added the Agnus Dei to the Mass

September 7, 2017

Pope St. Sergius I (Reigned 687-701), date of birth unknown; consecrated probably on 15 Dec., 687; died 8 Sept., 701. While Pope Conon lay dying, the archdeacon Pascal offered the exarch a large sum to bring about his election as his successor. Through the exarch’s influence the archdeacon was accordingly elected by a number of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 9 – Wife of a dissolute husband

September 7, 2017

Blessed Seraphina Sforza Born at Urbino about 1434; died at Pesaro, 8 September, 1478. Her parents were Guido Antonio of Montefeltro, Count of Urbino, and Cattarina Colonna. She was brought up at Rome by her maternal uncle, Martin V. In 1448 Seraphina married Alexander Sforza, Lord of Pesaro. Ten years afterwards her husband gave himself […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 9 – St. Omer

September 7, 2017

St. Omer Born of a distinguished family towards the close of the sixth or the beginning of the seventh century, at Guldendal, Switzerland; died c. 670. After the death of his mother, he, with his father, entered the monastery of Luxeuil in the Diocese of Besançon probably about 615. Under the direction of Saint Eustachius, […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 10 – Model of chastity

September 7, 2017

St. Nicholas of Tolentino Born at Sant’ Angelo, near Fermo, in the March of Ancona, about 1246; d. 10 September, 1306. He is depicted in the black habit of the Hermits of St. Augustine — a star above him or on his breast, a lily, or a crucifix garlanded with lilies, in his hand. Sometimes, […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 10 – They always carried a copy of his Bible in battle

September 7, 2017

St. Finnian of Moville Born about 495; died 589. Though not so celebrated as his namesake of Clonard, he was the founder of a famous school about the year 540. He studied under St. Colman of Dromore and St. Mochae of Noendrum (Mahee Island), and subsequently at Candida Casa (Whithern), whence he proceeded to Rome, […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 10 – Arrested while preaching

September 7, 2017

St. Edward Ambrose Barlow (Alias RADCLIFFE and BRERETON.) Priest and martyr, born at Barlow Hall, 1585; died 10 September, 1641. He was the fourth son of Sir Alexander Barlow, Knight of Barlow Hall, near Manchester, by Mary, daughter of Sir Uryan Brereton, Knight of Handforth Hall, Co. Chester, and was baptized at Didsbury Church 30 […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 10 – St. Pulcheria, Empress, and her husband Marcian

September 7, 2017

St. Pulcheria Empress of the Eastern Roman Empire, eldest daughter of the Emperor Arcadius, born 19 Jan., 399; died in 453. After the death of Arcadius (408), her younger brother, Theodosius II, then only seven, became emperor under the guardianship of Anthimus. Pulcheria had matured early and had great administrative ability; she soon exerted salutary […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 11 – Burned slowly to death at Nagasaki

September 7, 2017

Blessed Charles Spinola Born in Genoa in 1564, he was the son of the Count of Tassarolo, and the nephew of Cardinal Philip Spinola. He was educated in Spain and in the Jesuit school in Nola, Italy. He entered the noviatiate in 1584, and was ordained in 1594. In 1596, he received a letter appointing […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 11 – Italian army invades the Papal State without a declaration of war

September 7, 2017

The King of Italy sends an ultimatum to Blessed Pope Pius IX As the French military situation deteriorated [in the Franco-Prussian War], the government in Florence grew bolder. Near the end of August [1870], the Italian cabinet issued a circular letter to all the governments of Europe, in which it declared that the time had […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 11 – Prince Eugen of Savoy crushes the Turks at Zenta

September 7, 2017

Although his men had already done a forced march of over ten hours that day, Eugen gave the order to advance and then galloped ahead to see the scene at first hand. He spotted how, just above the bridge on the near side of the river, the water was shallow with a sandbank leading up […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 11 – His fame will last forever as that of a gallant soldier and a true Christian

September 7, 2017

Louis-Christophe-Leon Juchault de la Moricière French general and commander-in-chief of the papal army, b. at Nantes, 5 February, 1806; d. at the château of Prouzel, near Amiens, 11 September, 1865. His father was descended from an old Breton family whose device was Spes mea Deus. His mother was Desirée de Robineau de Bougon. He made […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 5 – Unashamed to beg alms even from his noble family

September 4, 2017

St. Laurence Justinian, Bishop and Confessor, First Patriarch of Venice Bishop and first Patriarch of Venice, born in 1381, and died 8 January, 1456. He was a descendant of the Giustiniani, a Venetian patrician family which numbered several saints among its members. Lawrence’s pious mother sowed the seeds of a devout religious life in the […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 6 – Blessed Thomas Tsuji

September 4, 2017

Born to the Japanese nobility in Sonogi on the island of Kyushu about the year 1571. Educated by Jesuits at Arima, he joined the Society of Jesus in 1587. He traveled all over Japan and became known for his eloquent, persuasive preaching. After the publication of an edict banning Catholic priests, he followed eighty of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 7 – The Outrage of Anagni

September 4, 2017

It had been the practice to speak of the spiritual and temporal powers in terms of pope and emperor, and it was long before it was realized, at least on the papal side, that the civil power, defeated as emperor, had returned to the attack with more aggressive vigour as the Monarchy and the State. […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 7: Richard the Lionheart defeats Saladin at Arsuf – Video

September 4, 2017

If video does not load, please click here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 7 – Grandson of Queen St. Clotilda

September 4, 2017

St. Cloud, Confessor A.D. 560. St. Cloud, called in Latin Chlodoardus, is the first and most illustrious saint among the princes of the royal family of the first race in France. He was son of Chlodomir, king of Orleans, the eldest son of St. Clotilda, and was born in 522. He was scarcely three years […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 7 – Milkos Zrinyi

September 4, 2017

Milkos Zrinyi Count, a Hungarian soldier, born in 1518, killed at Sziget, near the Brave, Sept. 7, 1566. When only 12 years old, Charles V. gave him a gold chain for his conduct during the siege of Vienna. He afterward became ban of Croatia, and at the siege of Sziget with 8,000 men he resisted […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

How King St. Ferdinand besieged Jaén and how God gave it to him with the whole kingdom of Granada

August 31, 2017

As son as he left the Queen and the infantes in Córdoba, Don Ferdinand left in the direction of Martos. There he had summoned the noblemen to discuss the campaign to conquer Jaén and to return it to the Kingship of Christ. Among those who came was one whom he liked since childhood. This was […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Nobility and Traditional Elites Today

August 31, 2017

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira Le Nouvel Aperçu, no. 6,  July-August 1994, published in French by the TFP Association Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, author of Noblesse et élites traditionnelles dans les allocutions de Pie XII, answers our questions Question: Two hundred years after the French Revolution, do you think that French society still has something to […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 1 – Gideon the Judge

August 31, 2017

Gideon or Gedeon (Hebrew “hewer”), also called JEROBAAL (Judges, vi, 32; vii, 1; etc.), and JERUBESHETH (II Kings, xi, 21, in the Hebrew text). Gideon was one of the Greater Judges of Israel. He belonged to the tribe of Manasses, and to the family of Abiezer (Judges, vi, 34). Gideon’s father was Joas, and lived […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 1 – St. Giles

August 31, 2017

(Latin Ægidius.) An Abbot, said to have been born of illustrious Athenian parentage about the middle of the seventh century. Early in life he devoted himself exclusively to spiritual things, but, finding his noble birth and high repute for sanctity in his native land an obstacle to his perfection, he passed over to Gaul, where […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →