According to The Royal Forums:

Spain’s Infanta Pilar, Duchess of Badajoz, assisted in the procession of the Jesus Christ of the Alabarderos yesterday, Good Friday.

The statue of Jesus Christ of the Alabarderos is carried through the streets of Madrid by 44 individuals, accompanied by fife and drum players from the military band.

The Infanta was given the task of setting the procession off from the Puerta del Príncipe of the Royal Palace in Madrid. Her niece, Infanta Elena, usually performs the task in her role as Honorary Senior Sister of the Congregation. Infanta Pilar’s daughter, Simoneta Gómez-Acebo, also attended the event.

To read the entire article in The Royal Forums, please click here.

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According to the Luxemburger Wort:

It was in 1418 the building was mentioned in official documents for the first time as the town hall, however just over a century later, the building and much of Luxembourg city was destroyed when lightning struck the Church of the Franciscan monks and ignited a stockpile gunpowder stored in the basement.

The explosion was powerful enough to set the town hall and many other buildings alight.

As if the turbulent past wasn’t enough, the palace was converted into a concert hall and tavern by the Nazis during the Second World War.

To read the entire article in the Luxemburger Wort, please click here.

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According to Royal Central:

…the Crown Prince of Iran, Reza Pahlavi has now called for a monarchist revolution in his birth country of Iran and calls for Trump and American help to transform the dictatorship to a parliamentarian monarchy.

It should be said that the Crown Prince wants to have a peaceful revolution that will be carried out by the Iranian people, and he does not envision an armed revolution with foreign military troops on the ground. Asked how his envisioned peaceful revolution could play out in Iran, Pahlavi said it would need to begin with the labour unions starting a nationwide strike.

To read the entire article on Royal Central, please click here.

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The Fate of Greed

April 20, 2017

When Christopher Columbus arrived in Hispaniola, August 1498, he found open rebellion and treachery. While Columbus, on his part, was struggling with unwearied energy to repress the calamities that were destroying the colony, and by enormous sacrifice and humiliation, in fear and anxiety, succeeding in restoring some order in Hispaniola, and preparing better days to come; his enemies in Spain made use of these calamities, and by this means finally succeeded in the war they had carried on for so many years against him.
When word reached King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of the chaos in Hispaniola, they decided to send an emissary to investigate. Unknowing to their Majesties, the one they sent was a greedy and envious enemy of Columbus. Arriving in San Domingo harbor, he immediately put Columbus into chains and released the traitors.

There can be no doubt, but that when a decision was to be made in regard to the affairs of the Indies, the enemies of Columbus assailed the Queen with every artifice and intrigue to secure a decision unfavorable to the admiral. The appointment of Don Francisco Bobadilla proves this. His subsequent cruelty and perfidy towards the admiral show plainly that he was either a tool of his most violent enemies, or else one of their numbers. It is impossible that a man, without previous feeling, could so shamelessly abuse his authority and suddenly change from a judge to a violent persecutor.

After six weeks in Spain, Columbus, freed of any wrong doing, was released by the Sovereigns and given commission for another voyage. Ordering Bobadilla to collect what was due to Columbus, by trade and mining of gold and to give these into the custody of Columbus’s designated agent. On March 14, 1502, with orders forbidding Columbus to stop at Hispaniola, Columbus embarked with four caravels and arrived later off of Hispaniola on June 29, 1502.

 

In accordance with the orders of the sovereigns, the first intention of Columbus was to steer directly to the land of Paria, and follow the coast till he came to the Strait, which he felt sure must be further on towards the west. But he was obliged to change his plan, because his largest vessel, not having the masts sunk deep enough in the keel, could not support the sails when spread, and the other vessels were delayed to keep her company. He, therefore, decided to touch at San Domingo to exchange this vessel for one of those which Nicolas de Ovando had lately brought out, or else to purchase another. This seemed to him so reasonable as to be safe from suspicion or blame. Ovando had arrived at San Domingo on the 15th of April. On the arrival of the new governor, all Bobadilla’s importance vanished.

Don Francisco Bobadilla

Solitary and neglected, deserted by the very persons he had favored the most, he experienced in his own case the fickleness of the popularity gained by flattering the vices of the multitude. But a strict investigation was made of Roldan and his companions, and most of them were ordered to Spain to answer for what they had done. None of them seemed uneasy about his fate, relying on the influence of their friends to protect them at court, and on Fonseca, who they knew was ready to defend any one who had shown himself hostile to the admiral. They also knew that the great quantities of gold they had collected would remove any danger that threatened.

All these [wealth] were to be sent back to Spain in the ships that brought Ovando to Hispaniola. Bobadilla took passage on the largest of the vessels, with an immense quantity of gold, the proceeds of the Crown revenues under his administration, which he confidently expected would cover every fault that might be found with his conduct. Roldan and his principal confederates were embarked on the same ship, so that with the gold intended for the Crown, and that which Bobadilla, Roldan, and the other chiefs of the revolt put on board as their private property, there was on the flag-ship the largest amount of gold that had ever been got together. But the greatest marvel was an enormous piece of virgin gold, famous in the old Spanish chronicles, and the largest that had yet been found.

By order of Bobadilla, Alonzo Sanchez de Carvajal, was in charge of the flimsy and smallest ship, Aguja, taking with him 4,000 pieces of gold that he had collected, belonging to Christopher Columbus— partly revenues collected since Columbus’s arrival, and partly what Bobadilla had been compelled to restore. It was the hope that Columbus’ gold on board the Aguja, would sink on it’s trip back to Spain.

Christopher Columbus in chains by Baron Gustave Wappers.

The preparations were all made, and the fleet ready to sail, when, on the 29th of June, the little squadron of Columbus appeared off  San Domingo. Columbus sent Pedro di Tereros, captain of one of the caravels, on shore, to inform Ovando of the need he had of changing one of his vessels, and to ask, at the same time, for permission to come into the harbor for shelter from a violent hurricane which Columbus saw, from various signs, would soon be upon them. Ovando refused both requests.

Columbus was deeply hurt at his repulse. “Who,” he wrote soon after to their Majesties, “who, not even excepting Job, would not have died of despair to see, when my safety and that of my son, my brother, and my other friends, was at stake, under these circumstances, access forbidden me to that land, and shelter in that port, which by the will of God and at the price of my blood I had won for Spain?”

But, in spite of his indignation, Columbus was anxious about the certain danger to which he saw the fleet, about to sail, would be exposed. He, therefore, sent Tereros back to entreat the governor not to let the fleet weigh anchor, assuring him that he saw sure indications of the approach of a frightful hurricane, and woe to the ships that should be caught at that moment at sea, and exposed to the fury of the winds and the rage of the Ocean.

Map showing location of Mona Passage

But they saw no signs of any danger, and seamen and pilots were impatient to start. Columbus’s predictions were scoffed at, and he was ridiculed as a false prophet.

Columbus, finding that his attempts to save those imprudent men were idle, and certain, from his long experience in observing the natural phenomena of those regions, that the hurricane was imminent, and would come from the land side, kept as close as possible to the shore, seeking for some bay or deserted river to shelter his little squadron. His men were discouraged and astounded at finding themselves excluded from a port of their own country, where even strangers, under like circumstances, would not be refused hospitality and shelter. They complained of their misfortune in sailing with a captain who seemed excluded from common justice, and anticipated nothing but evil on a voyage on which the sea persecuted them with constant dangers, and the land refused them protection or shelter.

Twelve of 13 ships that were part of Cabral’s fleet are depicted. Many were lost, as can be seen in this drawing from Memória das Armadas, c.1568

In the mean time, Bobadilla’s beautiful fleet of twenty-eight sail, with songs and music, left the safe harbor and sailed boldly out on the open sea. Sailing from Ozama and made for the Mona Passage, which is the Strait between Hispaniola and Puerto Rico that connects the Caribbean to the Atlantic. Columbus wrote, “The storm was terrible and on that night the ships were parted from me. Each one lost.” Columbus had instructed his convoy that if they should become separated, they should meet in the harbor on Ocoa Bay after the storm. His entire fleet arrived safely in Ocoa Bay on Sunday, July 3rd .

As for Bobadilla  and his thirty-ship fleet…

As they reached the eastern extremity of Hispaniola, the signs that precede a storm were manifest to every one, but the open menace was so quickly followed by the act, that the fleet had no time to seek shelter from the wrath of the sea, or to reach the open ocean and avoid the rocks near the shore. The tempest that burst on them was one of those tremendous hurricanes that sometimes gather up in tropical latitudes. The hurricane caught the convoy in the Mona Passage head on.  The flag-ship, on which were Bobadilla, Roldan, and the rest of Columbus’s most bitter enemies, was one of the first to feel the eye of the hurricane, and, driven on a rock, went down with all on board. The others, after a more or less desperate struggle for life, were broken or sunk. Three got back to San Domingo in a pitiable condition. In all, five hundred mariners perished.

Whilst Bobadilla’s fleet met with a fate unparalleled in history, smallest of all the fleet, the Aguja, carrying Columbus’s gold, came through unharmed and she crossed the Ocean, blessing God, arriving in Spain without the loss of a man or a thing.

Francesco Tarducci, The Life of Christopher Columbus, (Detroit: H. F. Brownson, Publisher, 1890), Vol. 2, pp. 227, 229, 230-232.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 573

 

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By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

I believed yesterday I said here – if not I will do it in two words – that with the Revolution, iniquity and evil became much more refined; and that after the immense sin, evil became much worse than it was before that sin. And that, for this reason, that occasion already required the existence of knights much more knightly than at the time of Roland.

Now, why did evil refine itself? Was it because it had more valiant fighters and more competent generals at its service?

This is something that can be discussed. I don’t believe it had more valiant fighters, but probably more competent generals; because just as the whole culture and civilization gradually developed in time, so did military art. We can conclude that military art grew a lot. But chivalry did not.

François-Athanase de Charette de La Contrie

François-Athanase de Charette de La Contrie

What is a knight? It is a Catholic warrior in the splendor of his virtue, in the splendor of his whole capacity etc.: this is the true knight.

So, the first point is: the knights disappeared.

Second point, warfare was transformed. The Revolution works much more on people’s minds than through bullets; it does much more by rotting people’s characters than by conquering with bullets. For example, the revolutionary evil wreaked by television in one single evening is incomparably worse than the damage a whole crusader army could do!

A 13mm cartridge for a Mauser T-Gewehr Model 1918.

On the other hand, it’s no use repressing television by force, because they will make another, clandestine type of television, this will rise again. In other words, one needs to win the battles of the spirit.

And the battles of the spirit require fighters in this struggle to have all the finesse, penetration, prophetic spirit and grit to fight and win this spiritual combat! But this supposes much greater dedication and much more self-giving than a regular warrior must have. Because a warrior goes to war, returns from war, lies in bed and waits for another battle.

People watching and enjoying a live Cricket match, on a small television, setup specially on a roadside -just to watch the match between India and Pakistan. Photo by Arvind Jain.

Not here. Night and day, night and day…

A man goes to the store to buy a small box of paper clips to put on his desk. The clips on offer may have a certain revolutionary influence. He must refuse them. He goes to another store to buy a pair of shoes; he has to make sure they are not revolutionary. A person goes by and greets him: he has to see whether that greeting was not revolutionary. He must be able to see the meaning of Revolution in everything in order to perceive and reject the Revolution in everything. Because, if he does not do that, the Revolution enters and takes over the situation.

So, the 21st century knight, that is, the man of the Counter-Revolution in the 21st century – not in the 20th – has to be a man profoundly imbued with this spirit; has to have an unparalleled dedication to the counter-revolutionary cause; and he needs to see the Revolution and the Counter-Revolution at every moment and on every occasion. This has to be that way, there is no way out.

The cradle, painted by Johann Hermann Kretzschmer

If he fails to do this, he can say what he wants; but when he appears before God he will have left behind him all the open doors through which the Revolution entered.

Take, for example, the case of a father – as will happen in the Reign of Mary – with nine or ten children, a common fact. If he does not infuse this spirit in all his children, what grandchildren will he leave? And if a father slacks off, his son might become a colossus of the Revolution. How is he going to account for that? So you perceive that this supposes a penetration, a perspicacity of soul, a dedication and combativeness even greater than the warrior’s.

(Excerpt from a Tea, Monday, Sept. 11, 1989 – Nobility.org translation)

 

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St. Anselm

St. AnselmArchbishop of Canterbury, Doctor of the Church; born at Aosta a Burgundian town on the confines of Lombardy, died 21 April, 1109.

His father, Gundulf, was a Lombard who had become a citizen of Aosta, and his mother, Ermenberga, came of an old Burgundian family. Like many other saints, Anselm learnt the first lessons of piety from his mother, and at a very early age he was fired with the love of learning. In after life he still cherished the memories of childhood, and his biographer, Eadmer, has preserved some incidents which he had learnt from the saint’s own lips. The child had heard his mother speak of God, Who dwelt on high ruling all things. Living in the mountains, he thought that Heaven must be on their lofty summits. “And while he often revolved these matters in his mind, it chanced that one night he saw in a vision that he must go up to the summit of the mountain and hasten to the court of God, the great King. But before he began to ascend…

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St. Leonidas

(Or LEONIDES.)

The Roman Martyrology records several feast days of martyrs of this name in different countries. Under date of 28 January there is a martyr called Leonides, a native of the Thebaid, whose death with several companions is supposed to have occurred during the Diocletian persecution (Acta SS., January, II, 832). Another Leonides appears on 2 September, in a long list of martyrs headed by a St. Diomedes. Together with a St. Eleutherius, a Leonides is honoured on 8 August. From other sources we know of a St. Leonidas, Bishop of Athens, who lived about the sixth century, and whose feast is celebrated on 15 April (“Acta SS.”, April, II, 378; “Bibliotheca hagiographica graeca”, 2nd ed., 137). Still another martyr of the name is honoured on 16 April, with Callistus, Charysius, and other companions (Acta SS., April, II, 402).

Origen Adamantius, the son of St. Leonides of Alexandria.

Origen Adamantius, the son of St. Leonides of Alexandria.

The best known of them all, however, is St. Leonides of Alexandria, father of the great Origen. From Eusebius (Hist. Eccles., VI, 1, 2) we learn that he died a martyr during the persecution under Septimius Severus in 202. He was condemned to death by the prefect of Egypt, Lactus, and beheaded. His property was confiscated. Leonides carefully cultivated the brilliant intellect of his son Origen from the latter’s childhood, and imparted to him the knowledge of Holy Scripture. The feast of St. Leonidas of Alexandria is celebrated on 22 April.

J.P. KIRSCH (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Pedralvarez Cabral

(Pedro Alvarez.)

Lithograph of Pedro Álvares Cabral

Lithograph of Pedro Álvares Cabral

A celebrated Portugese navigator, generally called the discoverer of Brazil, born probably around 1460; date of death uncertain. Very little is known concerning the life of Cabral. He was the third son of Fernao Cabral, Governor of Beira and Belmonte, and Isabel de Gouvea, and married Isabel de Castro, the daughter of the distinguished Fernando de Noronha. He must have had an exellent training ini navigation and large experience as a seaman, for King Emmanuel of Portugal considered him competent to continue the work of Vasco da Gama, and in the year 1500 placed him in command of a fleet which was to set sail for India. His commision was to establish permanent commercial relations and to introduce Christianity wherever he went, using force of arms when…

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St. George

Martyr, patron of England, suffered at or near Lydda, also known as Diospolis, in Palestine, probably before the time of Constantine. According to the very careful investigation of the whole question recently instituted by Father Delehaye, the Bollandist, in the light of modern sources of information, the above statement sums up all that can safely be affirmed about St. George, despite his early cultus and preeminent renown both in East and West.

Saint George and the dragon

The best known form of the legend of St. George…

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St. Adalbert of Bohemia

Born 939 of a noble Bohemian family; died 997.

He assumed the name of the Archbishop Adalbert (his name had been Wojtech), under whom he studied at Magdeburg. He became Bishop of Prague, whence he was obliged to flee on account of the enmity he had aroused by his efforts to reform the clergy of his diocese. He betook himself to Rome, and when released by Pope John XV from his episcopal obligations, withdrew to a monastery and occupied himself in the most humble duties of the house. Recalled by his people, who received him with great demonstrations of joy, he was nevertheless expelled a second time and returned to Rome…

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St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen

Born in 1577, at Sigmaringen, Prussia, of which town his father Johannes Rey was burgomaster; died at Sevis, 24 April, 1622.

St. FidelisOn the paternal side he was of Flemish ancestry. He pursued his studies at the University of Freiburg in the Breisgau, and in 1604 became tutor to Wilhelm von Stotzingen, with whom he travelled in France and Italy. In the process for Fidelis’s canonization Wilhelm von Stotzingen bore witness to the severe mortifications his tutor practised on these journeys. In 1611 he returned to Freiburg to take the doctorate in canon and civil law, and at once began to practise as an advocate. But the open corruption which found place in the law courts determined him to relinquish that profession and to enter the Church.

He was ordained priest the following year, and immediately afterwards was received into the Order of Friars Minor of the Capuchin Reform at Freiburg, taking the name of Fidelis. He has left an interesting memorial of his novitiate and of his spiritual development at that time in a book of spiritual exercises which he wrote for himself. This work was re-edited by Father Michael Hetzenauer, O.F.M. Cap., and republished in 1893 at Stuttgart under the title: “S. Fidelis…

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Mother Mary Euphrasia Pelletier, foundress of the Sisters of Our Lady of Charity of the Good Shepherd and canonized May 2, 1940 by Pope Pius XII.

Rose Virginie Pelletier before joining the Order.

Rose Virginie Pelletier before joining the Order.

The aim of this institute is to provide a shelter for girls and women of dissolute habits, who wish to do penance for their iniquities and to lead a truly christian life. Not only voluntary penitents but also those consigned by civil or parental authority are admitted. Many of these penitents desire to remain for life; they are admitted to take vows, and form the class of “Magdalens”, under the direction of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd. They are an austere contemplative community, and follow the Rule of the Third Order of Mount Carmel. Prayer, penance and manual labour are their principal occupations. Many of these “Magdalens” frequently rise to an eminent degree of sanctity. Besides girls and women of this class, the order also admits children who have been secured from danger, before they have fallen or been stained by serious crime. They are instructed in…

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Bl. Marie de l’Incarnation

Known also as Madame Acarie, foundress of the French Carmel, born in Paris, 1 February, 1566; died at Pontoise, April, 1618. By her family Barbara Avrillot belonged to the higher bourgeois society in Paris. Her father, Nicholas Avrillot was accountant general in the Chamber of Paris, and chancellor of Marguerite of Navarre, first wife of Henri IV; while her mother, Marie Lhuillier was a descendant of Etienne Marcel, the famous prévôt des marchands (chief municipal magistrate). She was placed with the Poor Clares of Longchamp for her education, and acquired there a vocation for the cloister, which subsequent life…

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April 18 – St. Willigis

April 17, 2017

St. Willigis

St. Willigis

Archbishop of Mainz, d. 23 Feb., 1011. Feast, 23 February or 18 April. Though of humble birth he received a good education, and through the influence of Bishop Volkold of Meissen entered the service of Otto I, and after 971 figured as chancellor of Germany. Otto II in 975 made him Archbishop of Mainz and Archchancellor of the Empire, in which capacity he did valuable service to the State. Hauch (Kirchengesch. Deutschlands, III, Leipzig, 1906, 414) calls him an ideal bishop of the tenth century. Well educated himself, he demanded solid learning in his clergy. He was known as a good and fluent speaker. In March, 975…

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St. Alphege

(or Elphege), Saint, born 954; died 1012; also called Godwine, martyred Archbishop of Canterbury, left his widowed mother and patrimony for the monastery of Deerhurst (Gloucestershire).

St. Alphege being asked for advice.

St. Alphege being asked for advice.

After some years as an anchorite at Bath, he there became abbot, and (19 Oct., 984) was made Bishop of Winchester. In 994 Elphege administered confirmation to Olaf of Norway at Andover, and it is suggested that his patriotic spirit inspired the decrees of the Council of Enham. In 1006, on becoming Archbishop of Canterbury, he went to Rome for the pallium. At this period England was much harassed by the Danes, who, towards the end of September, 1011, having sacked and burned Canterbury, made Elphege a prisoner.

On 19 April, 1012, at Greenwich, his captors, drunk with wine, and enraged at ransom being refused, pelted Elphege with bones of oxen and stones, till one Thurm dispatched him with an axe. Elphege’s body, after resting eleven years in St. Paul’s (London), was translated by King Canute to Canterbury.

His principal feast is kept on the 19th of April; that of his translation on the 8th of June.

He is sometimes represented with an axe cleaving his skull.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, ed. PLUMMER (Oxford, 1892-99); THIETMAR, Chronicle, in P. L., CXXXIX, 1384; OSBERN, Vita S. Elphegi in WHARTON, Anglia Sacra, II, 122 sqq.; Acta SS., April, II, 630; Bibl. Hag. Lat., 377; CHEVALIER, Repertoire, I, 1313; FREEMAN, Norman Conquest, I, v; BUTLER, Lives of the Saints, 18 April; STANTON, Menology, 19 April; HUNT in Dict. Nat. Biogr., s. v. AElfheah.

PATRICK RYAN (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Pope St. Leo IX

Pope St. Leo IX

Pope St. Leo IX earnestly spread the Cluny reform

Born at Egisheim, near Colmar, on the borders of Alsace, 21 June, 1002, Pope St. Leo IX died on 19 April, 1054. He belonged to a noble family which had given or was to give saints to the Church and rulers to the Empire. He was named Bruno. His father Hugh was first cousin to Emperor Conrad, and both Hugh and his wife Heilewide were remarkable for their piety and learning.

When five years of age, he was committed to the care of the energetic Berthold, Bishop of Toul, who had a school for the sons of the nobility. Intelligent, graceful in body, and gracious in disposition, Bruno was a favorite…

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Friar Minor and missionary, born at Ascoli in the March of Ancona in 1234; died there, 19 April, 1289.

He belonged to the noble family of Milliano and from his earliest years made penance the predominating element of his life.

He entered the Order of Friars Minor at Ascoli together with his townsman and lifelong friend, Girolamo d’Ascoli, afterwards minister general, and later pope under the title of Nicholas IV. Having completed his studies at Perugia, Conrad was sent to Rome to teach theology. Later he…

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Bl. John Finch

A stained glass window in St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Chorley, England. Permission to use by Roberta Estes.

A martyr, b. about 1548; d. 20 April, 1584. He was a yeoman of Eccleston, Lancashire, and a member of a well-known old Catholic family, but he appears to have been brought up in schism. When he was twenty years old he went to London where he spent nearly a year with some cousins at Inner Temple. While there he was forcibly struck by the contrast between Protestantism and Catholicism in practice and determined to lead a Catholic life. Failing to find advancement in London he returned to Lancashire where he was reconciled to Catholic Church. He then married and settled down, his house becoming a centre of missionary work, he himself harbouring priests and aiding them in every way, besides acting as catechist. His zeal drew on him the hostility of the authorities, and at Christmas, 1581, he was entrapped into bringing a priest, George Ostliffe, to a place where both were apprehended. It was given out that Finch, having betrayed the priest and other Catholics, had taken refuge with the Earl of Derby, but in fact, he was kept in the earl’s house as a prisoner, sometimes…

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Blessed Fr. James Bell

Stone marking the site of the Tyburn tree on the traffic island at the junction of Edgware Road, Marble Arch and Oxford Street

Stone marking the site of the Tyburn tree on the traffic island at the junction of Edgware Road, Marble Arch and Oxford Street

Priest and martyr, born at Warrington in Lancashire, England, probably about 1520; died 20 April, 1584. For the little known of him we depend on the account published four years after his death by Bridgewater in his “Concertatio” (1588), and derived from a manuscript which was kept at Douay when Challoner wrote his “Missionary Priests” in 1741, and is now in the Westminster Diocesan Archives. A few further details were collected by Challoner, and others are supplied by the State Papers. Having studied at Oxford he was ordained priest in Mary’s reign, but unfortunately conformed to the established Church under Elizabeth, and according to the Douay MS. “ministered their bare few sacraments about 20 years in diverse places of England”.  Finally deterred by conscience from the cure of souls and reduced to destitution, he sought a small readership as a bare subsistence. To obtain this he approached the patron’s wife, a Catholic lady, who induced him to be reconciled to the Church. After some time he was allowed to resume priestly functions, and for two years devoted himself to arduous missionary labours. He was at length apprehended (17 January 1583-84) and, having confessed his priesthood, was arraigned at Manchester Quarter-Sessions held during the same month, and sent for trial at Lancaster Assizes in March. When condemned and sentenced he said to the Judge: “I beg your Lordship would add to the sentence that my lips and the tops of my fingers may be cut off, for having sworn and subscribed to the articles of heretics contrary both to my conscience and to God’s Truth”. He spent that night in prayer and on the following day was hanged and quartered together with Ven. John Finch, a layman, 20 April, 1584.

He was beatified in 1929.

BRIDGEWATER, Concertatio ecclesiæ Catholicæ in Anglia, 1588; YEPEZ, Historia particular de la persecucion de Inglatera, 1599; CHALLONER, Missionary Priests 1741; Dict. Nat. Biog., IV, 163; GILLOW, Bibl. Dict. Eng. Cath., I, 173, citing State Papers in Public Record Office.

EDWIN BURTON (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Bl. Richard Sergeant

This is an illustration, said to be from about 1680, of the permanent gallows at Tyburn, which once stood where Marble Arch now stands. There was a three-mile cart ride in public from Newgate prison to the gallows, with large spectator stands lined along the way, so many people could see the hangings (for a fee). Huge crowds collected on the way and followed the accused to Tyburn.

This is an illustration, said to be from about 1680, of the permanent gallows at Tyburn, which once stood where Marble Arch now stands. There was a three-mile cart ride in public from Newgate prison to the gallows, with large spectator stands lined along the way, so many people could see the hangings (for a fee). Huge crowds collected on the way and followed the accused to Tyburn.

English martyr, executed at Tyburn, 20 April, 1586. He was probably a younger son of Thomas Sergeant of Stone, Gloucestershire, by Katherine, daughter of John Tyre of Hardwick. He took his degree at Oxford (20 Feb., 1570-1), and arrived at the English College, Reims, on 25 July, 1581. He was ordained subdeacon at Reims (4 April, 1582), deacon at Soissons (9 June, 1582), and priest at Laon (7 April, 1583). He said his first Mass on 21 April, and left for England on 10 September. He was indicted at the Old Bailey (17 April, 1586) as Richard lea alias Longe. With him was condemned and suffered Venerable William Thomson, a native of Blackburn, Lancashire, who arrived at the English College, Reims, on 28 May, 1583, and was ordained priest in the Reims cathedral (31 March, 1583-4). Thomson was arrested in the house of Roger Line, husband of the martyr Anne Line (q. v.) in Bishopsgate St. Without, while saying Mass. Both were executed merely for being priests and coming into the realm.

He was beatified in 1987.

CHALLONER, Missionary priests, I (London, 1878), nos. 32, 33; KNOX, Douay Diaries (London, 1878); FOSTER, Alumni Oxonienses, (Oxford, 1892); Harleian Soc. Publ. xxi (London, 1885), 258; POLLEN, English Martyrs 1584-1603 in Cath. Rec. Soc. (London, 1908), 129; Cath. Rec. Soc. II (London, 1906), 249, 255, 271.

John B. Wainewright (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Queen Elizabeth II presents a Guidon to The Royal Lancers at Windsor Castle

April 13, 2017

According to the Royal Household: The Queen…has presented a Guidon to The Royal Lancers during a ceremony in St George’s Hall, Windsor Castle. During the traditional ceremony at Windsor Castle Her Majesty touched the new Guidon, and presented it to the Regiment. A Guidon is a heraldic banner carried by cavalry regiments. They were traditionally […]

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“It is our duty…”

April 13, 2017

According to the Royal Household, on the 100th anniversary of the battle of Vimy Ridge, Queen Elizabeth II issued this message: [On…] the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge, there will be difficult memories of loss and of suffering, but also memories of many heroic acts of bravery and of sacrifice on the […]

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On Holy Thursday, King Saint Ferdinand washes the feet of twelve poor men

April 13, 2017

Lent passed, and Holy Week came. That year, the love of Christ inflamed the holy King’s heart more than ever. At times he would spend the whole night in contemplation of the sorrows that Our Lord suffered to redeem us; he slept so little that his nobles, worried, reached the point of telling him that […]

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An Invitation to Love the Holy Cross of Our Lord Jesus Christ

April 13, 2017

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira While commemorating the forty days Our Lord fasted in the desert, we should remember a great and supreme truth that should illuminate all Lenten meditations. The holy Gospels clearly show how much our merciful Savior pitied our spiritual and physical pains. Hence, He performed spectacular miracles to mitigate them. However, […]

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April 14 – She suffered for the moral corruption and decay of her time

April 13, 2017

Saint Lydwine In 1380, Saint Lydwine was born in the small town of Schiedam in Holland. Her father was a wealthy noble named Peter, and her mother was from a poor family who worked their own farm. Her father’s family lost their fortune, and the whole family was reduced to poverty. At that time, all […]

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April 16 – Martyred in the name of Equality

April 13, 2017

Just a few of the many martyrs during the French Revolution († 1792-1799) 16 April 1794 in Avrillé, Maine-et-Loire (France) Pierre Delépine layperson of the diocese of Angers born: 24 May 1732 in Marigné, Maine-et-Loire (France) Jean Ménard layperson of the diocese of Angers; married born: 16 November 1736 in Andigné… Read more here.

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April 17 – St. Stephen Harding

April 13, 2017

St. Stephen Harding Confessor, the third Abbot of Cîteaux, was born at Sherborne in Dorsetshire, England, about the middle of the eleventh century; died 28 March, 1134. He received his early education in the monastery of Sherborne and afterwards studied in Paris and Rome. On returning from the latter city he stopped at the monastery […]

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April 17 – One of the many nobles who spread the Cluny reform

April 13, 2017

St. Robert Founder of the Abbey of Chaise-Dieu in Auvergne, born at Aurilac, Auvergne, about 1000; died in Auvergne, 1067. On his father’s side he belonged to the family of the Counts of Aurilac, who had given birth to St. Géraud. He studied at Brioude near the basilica of St-Julien, in a school open to […]

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April 17 – He rescued his country from crushing debt, yet waged incessant war

April 13, 2017

Maximilian I Duke of Bavaria, 1598-1622, Elector of Bavaria and Lord High Steward of the Holy Roman Empire, 1623-1651; born at Munich, 17 April, 1573; died at Ingolstadt, 27 September, 1651. The lasting services he rendered his country and the Catholic Church justly entitle him to the surname of “Great”. He was the son of […]

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April 11 – He excommunicated the king, who murdered him as he celebrated Mass

April 10, 2017

Saint Stanislaus of Cracow In pictures he is given the episcopal insignia and the sword. Larger paintings represent him in a court or kneeling before the altar and receiving the fatal blow. His parents, Belislaus and Bogna, pious and noble Catholics, gave him a religious education. After the death of his parents he distributed his […]

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April 12 – St. Teresa of the Andes

April 10, 2017

Saint Teresa of the Andes, O.C.D. (July 13, 1900 – April 12, 1920), also known as Saint Teresa of Jesus of the Andes (Spanish: Teresa de Jesús de los Andes), was a Chilean nun of the Discalced Carmelite order.She was born Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández y Solar in Santiago, Chile into […]

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April 12 – Crusader in every sense of the word

April 10, 2017

Bl. Angelo Carletti di Chivasso Moral theologian of the order of Friars Minor; born at Chivasso in Piedmont, in 1411; and died at Coni, in Piedmont, in 1495. From his tenderest years the Blessed Angelo was remarkable for the holiness and purity of his life. He attended the University of Bologna, where he received the […]

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April 12 – Pope St. Julius I

April 10, 2017

(337-352) The immediate successor of Pope Silvester, Arcus, ruled the Roman Church for only a very short period – from 18 January to 7 October, 336 – and after his death the papal chair remained vacant for four months. What occasioned this comparatively long vacancy is unknown. On 6 February, 337, Julius, son of Rustics […]

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April 13 – Born blind, lame, deformed, hunchbacked and dwarfed

April 10, 2017

Blessed Margaret of Castello (1287–1320) is the patroness of the poor, crippled, and the unwanted. She was born blind, lame, deformed, hunchbacked and a dwarf, into a family of nobles in the castle of Metola, in southeast of Florence. As a child, her parents Parisio and Emilia imprisoned her for 14 years so no one […]

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April 13 – This Prince Defied His Family

April 10, 2017

St. Hermengild Date of birth unknown; died 13 April, 585. Leovigild, the Arian King of the Visigoths (569-86), had two sons, Hermengild and Reccared, by his first marriage with the Catholic Princess Theodosia. Hermengild married, in 576, Ingundis, a Frankish Catholic princess, the daughter of Sigebert and Brunhilde. Led by his own inclination, and influenced […]

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April 13 – Pope St. Martin I

April 10, 2017

Pope St. Martin I Martyr, born at Todi on the Tiber, son of Fabricius; elected Pope at Rome, 21 July, 649, to succeed Theodore I; d at Cherson in the present peninsulas of Krym, 16 Sept., 655, after a reign of 6 years, one month and twenty six days, having ordained eleven priests, five deacons […]

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The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall dismiss traditional garb in meeting with Pope Francis

April 6, 2017

According to the Royal Forums: The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall had a private audience with Pope Francis on Tuesday as part of their week-long tour of Europe. In a sign of changing times at the Vatican, the Duchess did not wear black or a mantilla, as has been usual tradition for […]

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A Stable Kingdom in Turbulent Times

April 6, 2017

According to Handelsblatt: While Liechtenstein may enjoy political stability, tough times could still be in store for the principality, with populism and protectionism on the rise among its neighbors in Europe. …Prince Alois warns that its major employers – tool maker Hilti, heating and air systems company Hoval, and the prepared foods company Hilcona – […]

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The Legend of St. Dismas

April 6, 2017

by Pauline Sanders Many years ago, after Jesus was born, the evil King Herod waited for the three kings from the Orient to return to his kingdom with news of the newborn King. When they did not return, Herod grew afraid that this new King would cause him to lose his throne. Because of this, […]

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Suffering and the Little Way

April 6, 2017

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira * There is a valuable deposition from the canonization of Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus, given by her sister Céline. It reveals aspects of the saint’s life about which few are aware and to which, even less give due importance. The information contained in this document is ironclad. Not […]

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April 7 – Father of Modern Pedagogy

April 6, 2017

St. John Baptist de la Salle Founder of the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, educational reformer, and father of modern pedagogy, was born at Reims, 30 April, 1651, and died at Saint-Yon, Rouen, on Good Friday, 7 April, 1719. The family of de la Salle traces its origin to Johan Salla, who, […]

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April 8 – Together with a noble who escaped the Terror, she founded the Sisters of Notre Dame

April 6, 2017

St. Julie Billiart (Also Julia). Foundress, and first superior-general of the Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame of Namur, born 12 July, 1751, at Cuvilly, a village of Picardy, in the Diocese of Beauvais and the Department of Oise, France; died 8 April, 1816, at the motherhouse of her institute, Namur, Belgium. She was […]

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April 9 – She persuaded her husband the Count to become a monk

April 6, 2017

St. Waudru She was daughter to the princess St. Bertille, elder sister to St. Aldegondes, and wife to Madelgaire, count of Hainault, and one of the principal lords of King Dagobert’s court. After bearing him two sons and two daughters, she induced him to embrace the monastic state at Haumont, near Maubeuge, taking the name […]

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April 9 – Mary of Cleophas

April 6, 2017

Mary of Cleophas This title occurs only in John, xix, 25. A comparison of the lists of those who stood at the foot of the cross would seem to identify her with Mary, the mother of James the Less and Joseph ( Mark, xv, 40; cf. Matt., xxvii, 56). Some have indeed tried to identify […]

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April 10 – Friend of Cluny

April 6, 2017

St. Fulbert of Chartres Bishop, born between 952 and 962; died 10 April, 1028 or 1029. Mabillon and others think that he was born in Italy, probably at Rome; but Pfister, his latest biographer, designates as his birthplace the Diocese of Laudun in the present department of Gard in France. He was of humble parentage […]

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April 4 – Grandmother of the Templars

April 3, 2017

Saint Aleth of Dijon Mother of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, she belonged to the highest nobility of Burgundy. Her husband, Tescelin, was lord of Fontaines. Saint Bernard of Clairvaux was the third of her seven children.  At the age of nine years, Bernard was sent to a much renowned school at Chatillon-sur-Seine, kept by the […]

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April 4 – Patron Saint of Transitions

April 3, 2017

St. Isidore of Seville Born at Cartagena, Spain, about 560; died 4 April, 636. Isidore was the son of Severianus and Theodora. His elder brother Leander was his immediate predecessor in the Metropolitan See of Seville; whilst a younger brother St. Fulgentius presided over the Bishopric of Astigi. His sister Florentina was a nun, and […]

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April 5 – St. Æthelburh and the Rose Named After Her

April 3, 2017

Saint Æthelburh (died 647), also known as Ethelburga, Ædilburh and Æthelburga (Old English: Æþelburh), was an early Anglo-Saxon queen consort of Northumbria, the second wife of King Edwin. As she was a Christian from Kent, their marriage triggered the initial phase of the conversion of the pagan north of England to Christianity. Æthelburh date of […]

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April 5 – Soul on Fire

April 3, 2017

St. Vincent Ferrer Famous Dominican missionary, born at Valencia, 23 January, 1350; died at Vannes, Brittany, 5 April, 1419. He was descended from the younger of two brothers who were knighted for their valor in the conquest of Valencia, 1238. In 1340 Vincent’s father, William Ferrer, married Constantia Miguel, whose family had likewise been ennobled […]

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April 6 – With his head split open, he wrote on the ground with his own blood: “Credo”

April 3, 2017

St. Peter of Verona Born at Verona, 1206; died near Milan, 6 April, 1252. His parents were adherents of the Manichæan heresy, which still survived in northern Italy in the thirteenth century. Sent to a Catholic school, and later to the University of Bologna, he there met St. Dominic, and entered the Order of the […]

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April 6 – He wrote the genealogy of the Danish kings to disprove the alleged impediment of consanguinity

April 3, 2017

St. William of Ebelholt (Also called William of Paris, or William of Eskilsöe) Died on Easter Sunday, 1203, and was buried at Ebelholt. He was educated by his uncle Hugh, forty-second Abbot of St-Germain-des-Pres at Paris; and having been ordained subdeacon received a canonry in the Church of Ste-Geneviève-du-Mont. His exemplary life did not commend […]

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New security measures at Buckingham Palace

March 30, 2017

According to The Crown Chronicles: A new set of bollards have been placed outside of Buckingham Palace overnight, in response to the recent Westminster attack. The yellow structures will prevent any vehicles mounting the pavement area – as happened in the attack on Wednesday – but will slow the flow of foot traffic at the […]

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Poll: 68% of Surveyed Russians Do Not Want To Restore Monarchy

March 30, 2017

According to the Royal Forums: A telephone poll conducted earlier in March by the All-Russian Center for the Study of Public Opinion has shown that 68% of those surveyed do not want to restore the monarchy in Russia. When the respondents were asked what style of government was “most suitable for the Russian state” – […]

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Easter in Imperial Russia: the Royal Doors

March 30, 2017

The time to arrive was about 11:30 p.m., when the great church, packed to its doors by a vast throng, was wrapped in almost total darkness…. As the eyes grew accustomed to the shadows, tens of thousands of unlighted candles, outlining the arches, cornices, and other architectural features of the cathedral, were just visible. These […]

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While summoning the world’s Zouaves to defend the Papal States, Pius IX appeared ashamed of promoting that spirit

March 30, 2017

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira Somehow, when summoning the Zouaves of the world to defend the Papal States, Pius IX by no means preached a crusade. Of course the doctrine was on his mind, but there was a kind of shame and fear of pushing that spirit forward because of the excess which, through a […]

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March 31 – Saint Eulogius of Alexandria

March 30, 2017

Saint Eulogius of Alexandria Patriarch of that See from 580 to 607. He was a successful combatant of the heretical errors then current in Egypt, notably the various phases of Monophysitism. He was a warm friend of St. Gregory the Great, corresponded with him, and received from that pope many flattering expressions of esteem and […]

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March 31 – St. Balbina

March 30, 2017

St. Balbina Memorials of a St. Balbina are to be found at Rome in three different spots which are connected with the early Christian antiquities of that city. In the purely legendary account of the martyrdom of St. Alexander (acta SS., Maii, I, 367 sqq.) mention is made of a tribune Quirinus who died a […]

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April 1 – Precursor of Our Lady of Fatima

March 30, 2017

St. Nuno De Santa Maria Álvares Pereira (1360-1431) NUNO ÁLVARES PEREIRA was born in Portugal on 24th June 1360, most probably at Cernache do Bomjardin, illegitimate son of Brother Álvaro Gonçalves Pereira, Hospitalier Knight of St. John of Jerusalem and prior of Crato and Donna Iria Gonçalves do Carvalhal. About a year after his birth, […]

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April 1 – St. Hugh of Grenoble

March 30, 2017

Bishop and Confessor The first tincture of the mind is of the utmost importance to virtue; and it was the happiness of this saint to receive from his cradle the strongest impressions of piety by the example and care of his illustrious and holy parents. He was born at Chateau-neuf, in the territory of Valence […]

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April 1 – Blessed Karl, Emperor of Austria

March 30, 2017

(Also known as Carlo d’Austria, Charles of Austria) Born August 17, 1887, in the Castle of Persenbeug in the region of Lower Austria, his parents were the Archduke Otto and Princess Maria Josephine of Saxony, daughter of the last King of Saxony. Emperor Francis Joseph I was Charles’ Great Uncle… Read more here.

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