The new heresies had gained adherents in Paris. Calvin was there, and Servet, his future victim; and Rabelais, the precursor of Voltaire. Calvin, who had studied philosophy at the College de Montaigu, had made the rest of his studies at Ste.Barbe, and, while St. Ignatius was there, frequently came thither. He gained many converts to his opinions, and, to the great horror of the Sorbonne, even within its own walls. Among these was Kopp, the Rector of the University, who, lecturing once on the doctrine of justification, so scandalized his audience that they created an uproar in the streets. Kopp hid himself for a time, and then fled from Paris. Calvin was glad to take refuge with a vinedresser in the Faubourg St. Victor, who, giving him his own gown and rake, set him on the road to Nérac, where he was sheltered by Queen Margaret of Navarre.

Philipp Melanchthon.

Francis I, in his zeal for the revival of letters, had, inspite of the remonstrances of the Sorbonne, brought professors of Greek and Hebrew from Germany, who spread the doctrines of Luther and Zwingli. Some professors were needed ; for, according to an almost incredible statement of Galland, “There was not, in the beginning of that reign, a Frenchman who could read Greek or write Latin.” The King’s sisters, Margaret and Rende of France, favored the Protestants at court; the Sacramentarians affixed their theses, the work of Calvin, at the gates of the Louvre, and even on the doors of the King’s apartment in the palace of Blois.

Francis professed indeed the greatest horror of all heresy, to which, probably, he was in reality perfectly indifferent ; but he encouraged literature, which amused him, and he conferred, he thought, a luster upon his reign by these importations from the infected countries, whose influence he could not entirely neutralize, even when he afterwards endeavored to suppress it by most severe measures. St. Ignatius, therefore, had plenty of occupation in confirming the waverers, and in confuting the ideas which had taken possession of erratic minds. Many, when they heard him, wished to be again secure within the true fold; and these he brought before Valentine Leivin, the inquisitor, that they might be reconciled to the Church.

Portrait of Martin Luther by Lucas Cranach the Younger.

It was not surprising that any semblance of novelty was regarded with suspicion, when events were passing which threatened the most serious dislocation that the Christian world had ever yet known. The Lutherans over half Germany had long been in open rebellion; Charles V feared to exasperate them, because he wanted to concentrate his forces against the Turks. The Confession of Augsburg had shown that no compromise could be of any avail; for the Emperor had, in fact, already allowed liberty of worship, proscribing only Anabaptists and Sacramentarians, whose excesses horrified decent men of all parties. Protestants, as well as Catholics, were permitted to preach and explain the Scriptures “in the sense given to them by the Fathers.” The Lutherans were still dissatisfied; in fact, toleration was but a small part of what Luther demanded, and the last thing he was willing to grant.

On the remonstrance of Frederic, Count Palatine, the Protestants reduced their claims to these: — First, communion under both kinds; second, marriage allowed to priests; third, the omission in the mass of the invocation of Saints; fourth, the Church property which had been stolen to remain with the plunderers; fifth, a General Council to be called immediately to decide on other points in dispute. For all this while, and inspite of the insane hatred of Luther against the Pope, a Council to be summoned by him was always demanded by the Protestant party; they were not yet ready to follow their leader, and openly defy the head of the Church.

John Calvin

Melanchthon, in another conference appointed by Charles, when seven persons on each side were to revise and modify the Confession of Augsburg, suggested so many motives and ways for reconciliation, that Luther burst into curses against him. He had agreed with the Catholics on fifteen articles; partially agreed on three more; and the remaining three were allowed to be placed under the head of “abuses.” The points of agreement were important,* and peace might reasonably have been hoped for; but peace was not the aim of those who expected to make their own fortunes in the general disturbance of Germany. Luther and his partisans desired war at any price; and the oil that Melanchthon cast upon the waters was as nothing in the violence of the storm.

The Lutheran leaders, assembled at Smalkald, resolved on resisting the Emperor; the Diet, convened at Cologne to elect his brother, Ferdinand, King of the Romans, gave a new occasion of revolt; they threatened to join their forces to those of Suleimán, who was then invading Austria, if they were opposed in their schemes of religious emancipation. Charles was compelled to sign the peace of Nuremberg; after which, the Protestant chiefs having enabled him to make an imposing display before the walls of Vienna, Suleimán approached, saw, and withdrew without a battle. Charles had an interview with Clement VII, the most unfortunate sovereign in Europe, at Bologna, as the Emperor passed there on his way to Spain. They agreed that a General Council should be summoned. Clement met Francis I, at Marseilles; the marriage of Catharine de’ Medici, the Pope’s niece, with the Duke of Orleans was decided upon; and Clement returned full of satisfaction to Rome. But there he learned that the Turks had besieged Tunis, and were plundering the coasts of Italy; that the Anabaptists had renewed their hateful excesses in Westphalia, and taken Munster. His own family had long embittered his life; the Cardinals de’ Medici and Cosmo, his nephews, were fighting for Florence. The Pope consulted his Cardinals; they could only advise him to negotiate a peace, if possible, between the princes of Christendom, and convoke the Council so long desired.

Pope Clement VII

Clement saw that these measures were now indispensable; and he would have endeavored in sincerity to carry them forward, if life had been granted him; but he was now an old man, and could no longer struggle against so much perplexity and grief. His Holiness took the matter exceedingly to heart, and it was this sorrow and dread that seems to have brought him to the grave.

* Melanchthon allowed “that the Saints intercede for us, and that we may celebrate their memory on certain days; that Our Lord is contained entire under one species ; that certain week-days should be kept holy, and a fast be observed on the vigils of some of these; that faith and justification come by grace, but man has free will. “The Church was eager to reform every abuse, and the Council of Trent was actually legislating against them. Hence the disaffected, who hoped to profit by the suppression of monasteries and the plunder of ecclesiastical property, had no true desire that religious dissensions should be healed.

St. Ignatius Loyola and the early Jesuits, by Stewart Rose 1891, Pgs 178-185

Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 656

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By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

All of us are inclined to pick on standards of living superior to ours as superfluous. This comes from self-love: “I live entirely well with what suffices to me, so why does so-and-so want more than he needs? He is vain! Proud! Does he think he is more than me?” Or, even worse: “What a fool! He is misled by advertising. He allowed himself to be persuaded that paté de foie gras is good when onion dip is better.”

Foie gras

And the thing circulates. If we say that pâté is something refined, he replies: “Refined nothing! You’ve been reading too much literature! Bean soup is the real thing! You stuff yourself with a good feijoada [a very tasty, popular Brazilian traditional black bean and pork dish] and later need no dinner. Here you come with your refined pâté on toast! This is something effeminate and stupid!”

I cannot forget an episode that happened when I was a lad. I went to a farm somewhere here in the interior of São Paulo that had plenty of red topsoil. The farmhouse had only two sinks, one in the bathroom and the other in the dining room. If we were in a hurry, then we had to wash our face in the dining room where people were eating or drinking coffee.

Feijoada. Photo by raphaelstrada

So I washed my hands and face there and inadvertently dropped the towel on the floor full or red dust. “Oh goodness me, I have to ask for another towel now,” I said. Upon hearing this, three or four lads my age started laughing: “Send for another towel? Just because of this dust? You will be covered in it out there! You might as well wipe your face with it.”  As I protested and they figured the spat would turn into an incident, they quipped: “Well, since you had a very fine upbringing you are unable to bear the things we endure.” This was their concept of a very fine education.

Thus, to not smear your face with red ground dust is most refined and superfluous. This is a concept of a certain thing and a certain state of mind. This state of mind comes from this egalitarian concept: “What is enough for me is enough for absolutely everyone, and that stupid Queen of Denmark is pretentious and proud for wishing to ride in a carriage with crystal wheels when my mother drives around with Goodyear tires on her car, and that is good enough.”

Goodyear Tires

So another thing is to understand that there are requirements of refinement and good taste that we do not understand but that does not make us fools but sagacious, as we perceive the difference. We have to take an attitude of humility and understanding toward what we were unable to understand.

(Excerpt from a Saint of the Day, Tuesday, April 19, 1966 – Nobility.org translation)

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St. John of the Cross

Founder (with St. Teresa) of the Discalced Carmelites, doctor of mystic theology, born at Hontoveros, Old Castile, 24 June, 1542; died at Ubeda, Andalusia, 14 Dec., 1591.

John de Yepes, youngest child of Gonzalo de Yepes and Catherine Alvarez, poor silk weavers of Toledo, knew from his earliest years the hardships of life. The father, originally of a good family but disinherited on account of his marriage below his rank, died in the prime of his youth; the widow, assisted by her eldest son, was scarcely able to provide the bare necessities. John was sent to the poor school at Medina del Campo, whither the family had gone to live, and proved an attentive and diligent pupil; but when apprenticed to an artisan, he seemed incapable of learning anything…

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December 15 – St. Drostan

December 13, 2018

St. Drostan

(DRUSTAN, DUSTAN, THROSTAN)

st drostanA Scottish abbot who flourished about a.d. 600. All that is known of him is found in the “Breviarium Aberdonense” and in the “Book of Deir”, a ninth-century MS. now in the University Library of Cambridge, but these two accounts do not agree in every particular. He appears to have belonged to the royal family of the Scoti, his father’s name being Cosgrach. Showing signs of a religious vocation he was entrusted at an early age to the care of St. Columba, who trained him and gave him the monastic habit. He accompanied that saint when he visited Aberdour (Aberdeen) in Buchan. The Pictish ruler of that country gave them the site of Deir, fourteen miles farther inland, where they established a monastery, and when St. Columba returned to Iona he left St. Drostan there as abbot of the new foundation. On the death of the Abbot of Dalquhongale (Holywood) some few years later, St. Drostan was chosen to succeed him. Afterwards, feeling called to a life of greater seclusion, he resigned his abbacy, went farther north, and became a hermit at Glenesk. Here his sanctity attracted the poor and needy, and many miracles are ascribed to him, including the restoration of sight to a priest named Symon. After his death his relics were transferred to Arberdour and honourably preserved there. The “Breviary of Aberdeen” celebrates his feast on 15 December. The monastery of Deir, which had fallen into decay, was rebuilt for Cistercian monks in 1213 and so continued until the Reformation.

DEMPSTER, Hist. Eccl. Gent. Scot. (Edinburgh, 1829); Breviarium Aberdonense (London, 1854); INNES, Scotland in the Middle Ages (Edinburgh, 1860); FORBES, Kalendar of Scottish Saints (Edinburgh, 1872); GAMMACK in Dict. of Christ. Biog. (London, 1877).

G. CYPRIAN ALSTON (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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St. Adelaide

(ADELHEID).

St. AdelaideBorn 931; died 16 December, 999, one of the conspicuous characters in the struggle of Otho the Great to obtain the imperial crown from the Roman Pontiffs.

She was the daughter of Rudolph II, King of Burgundy, who was at war with Hugh of Provence for the crown of Italy. The rivals concluded a peace in 933, by which it was stipulated that Adelaide should marry Hugh’s son Lothaire. The marriage took place, however, only fourteen years later; Adelaide’s mother meantime married Hugh. By this time Berengarius, the Marquis of Ivrea, came upon the scene, claiming the Kingdom of Italy for himself…

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Saint Judicael ap Hoel (c. 590 – 16 or 17 December 658) was the King of Domnonée and a Breton high king in the mid-seventh century.

According to Gregory of Tours, the Bretons were divided into various regna (subkingdoms) during the sixth century, of which Domnonée, Cornouaille, and Broweroch are the best known; they had been under Frankish suzerainty during the time of Clovis I. This they had thrown off by the time of Chilperic I, who subdued them and their chief Waroch II, at least in the east of Brittany. Guntram, Chilperic’s brother, retained his lordship over Waroch and the Brittani formed a Frankish tributary-vassal state through the reign of Dagobert I…

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St. Ado, Archbishop of Vienne, Confessor

Born about 800, in the diocese of Sens; died 16 December, 875.

St. Ado of ViennaHe was brought up at the Benedictine Abbey of Ferrières, and had as one of his masters the Abbot Lupus Servatus, one of the most celebrated humanists of those times. By his brilliant talents and assiduous application Ado gained the esteem of his masters and schoolmates, while his ready obedience, deep humility, and sincere piety foreshadowed his future holiness.

Though urged on all sides to enter upon a career in the world, to which his nobility of birth and great intellectual abilities entitled him, he consecrated himself entirely to God by taking the Benedictine habit at Ferrières. When Markward, a monk of Ferrières, became Abbot of Prüm near Trier, he applied for Ado to teach the sacred sciences there. His request was granted. Soon, however, certain envious monks of Prüm conceived an implacable hatred against Ado, and upon the death of Markward, turned him out of their monastery. With the permission of his abbot, Ado now made a pilgrimage to Rome, where he remained five years. He then went to Ravenna, where he discovered an old Roman martyrology which served as the basis for his own renowned martyrology published in 858, which is generally known as the Martyrology of Ado. At Lyons he was received with open arms by the Archbishop, St. Remigius, who, with the consent of the Abbot of Ferrières, appointed him pastor of the Church of St. Roman near Vienne…

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December 17 – St. Olympias

December 13, 2018

St. OlympiasBorn 360-5; died 25 July, 408, probably at Nicomedia. This pious, charitable, and wealthy disciple of St. John Chrysostom came from an illustrious family in Constantinople. Her father (called by the sources Secundus or Selencus) was a “Count” of the empire; one of her ancestors, Ablabius, filled in 331 the consular office, and was also praetorian prefect of the East. As Olympias was not thirty years of age in 390, she cannot have been born before 361. Her parents died when she was quite young, and left her an immense fortune. In 384 or 385 she married Nebridius, Prefect of Constantinople. St. Gregory of Nazianzus, who had left Constantinople in 381, was invited to the wedding, but wrote a letter excusing his absence (Ep. cxciii, in P.G., XXXVI, 315), and sent the bride a poem (P.G., loc. cit., 1542 sqq.). Within a short time Nebridius died, and Olympias was left a childless widow. She steadfastly rejected all new proposals of marriage, determining to devote herself to the service of God and to works of charity. Nectarius, Bishop of Constantinople (381-97), consecrated her deaconess. On the death of her husband the emperor Subscription5had appointed the urban prefect administrator of her property, but in 391 (after the war against Maximus) restored her the administration of her large fortune. She built beside the principal church of Constantinople a convent, into which three relatives and a large number of maidens withdrew with her to consecrate themselves to the service of God. When St. John Chrysostom became Bishop of Constantinople (398), he acted as spiritual guide of Olympias and her companions, and, as many undeserving approached the kind-hearted deaconess for support, he advised her as to the proper manner of utilizing her vast fortune in the service of the poor (Sozomen, “Hist. eccl.”, VIII, ix; P.G., LXVII, 1540). Olympias resigned herself wholly to Chrysostom’s direction, and placed at his disposal ample sums for religious and charitable objects. Even to the most distant regions of the empire extended her benefactions to churches and the poor.

When Chrysostom was exiled, Olympias supported him in every possible way, and remained a faithful disciple, refusing to enter into communion with his unlawfully appointed successor. Chrysostom encouraged and guided her through his letters, of which seventeen are extant (P.G., LII, 549 sqq.); these are a beautiful memorial of the noble-hearted, spiritual daughter of the great bishop. Olympias was also exiled, and died a few months after Chrysostom. After her death she was venerated as a saint. A biography dating from the second half of the fifth century, which gives particulars concerning her from the “Historia Lausiaca” of Palladius and from the “Dialogus de vita Joh. Chrysostomi”, proves the great veneration she enjoyed. During he riot of Constantinople in 532 the convent of St. Olympias and the adjacent church were destroyed. Emperor Justinian had it rebuilt, and the prioress, Sergia, transferred thither the remains of the foundress from the ruined church of St. Thomas in Brokhthes, where she had been buried. We possess an account of this translation by Sergia herself. The feast of St. Olympias is celebrated in the Greek Church on 24 July, and in the Roman Church on 17 December.

Vita S. Olympiadis et narratio Sergiae de eiusdem translatione in Anal. Bolland. (1896), 400 sqq., (1897), 44 sqq.; BOUSQUET, Vie d’Olympias la diaconesse in Revue de l’Orient chret. (1900), 225 sqq.; IDEM, Recit de Sergia sur Olympias, ibid. (1907), 255 sqq.; PALLADIUS, Hist. Lausiaca, LVI, ed. BUTLER (Cambridge, 1904); Synaxarium Constantinopol., ed. DELAHAYE, Propylaeum ad Acta SS., November (Brussels, 1902), 841-2; MEURISSE, Hist. d’Olympias, diaconesse de Constantinople (Metz, 1670); Venables in Dict. Christ. Biog., s.v. See also the bibliography of JOHN CHRYSOSTOM, SAINT.

J.P. KIRSCH (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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This saint was daughter of Pepin of Landen, eldest sister to St. Gertrude of Nivelle, and married Ansegise, son to St. Arnoul, who was some time mayor of the palace, and afterwards bishop of Metz. Her husband being killed in hunting, she dedicated herself to a penitential state of retirement, and, after performing a pilgrimage to Rome, built seven chapels at Anden on the Meuse, in imitation of the seven principal churches at Rome.

St. BeggaThere she also founded a great nunnery in imitation of that which her sister governed at Nivelle, (1) from which she was furnished with a little colony who laid the foundation of this monastery, and lived under her direction. Many holy virgins were trained up by them in the perfect practice of piety. The rich monastery of Anden was afterwards converted into a collegiate church of thirty-two canonesses of noble families, with ten canons to officiate at the altar. It is situate in the forest of Ardenne, in the diocess of Namur. St. Begga departed to our Lord in the year 698, and is named in the Roman Martyrology.

Subscription24

See Miræus, in Fastis Belgicis, and G. Ryckel, Vita S. Beggæ. Beguinarum et Beguardorum Fundatricis. Lovani, 1631, in 4to.
_____________________
Note 1. Many ascribe to St. Begga the institution of the Beguines, very numerous at Mechlin, Ghent, and other places in Brabant, the Flemish Flanders, and some neighbouring provinces of the Low Countries. They devote themselves to the divine service under simple vows of chastity, and certain pious rules, which only oblige so long as they remain in that state. But Ægidius Aureæ Vallis, and other historians inform us, that the Beguines were instituted by Lambert le Begue or Balbus, a pious priest of Liege, in 1170, and derived from him their name. See Ægidius Aureæ Vallis, in Gestis Episcoporum Leodiens. Cheapville, t. 2, p. 126. Miræus in Chron. Cisterc. p. 199. Sanderus et Foppens in Bibl. Belg. t. 2, p 796. Also, Disquisitio Historica de Origine Beghinarum, Autore P. Coens. Leodii, 1629: and Lettre sur l’Origine et Progrès des Béguines

Rev. Alban Butler (1711–73).  Volume XII: December.
The Lives of the Saints.  1866.
p. 733

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To systematize the work of evangelizing Germany, St. Boniface organized a hierarchy on the usual ecclesiastical basis; in Bavaria the Dioceses of Salzburg, Freising, Ratisbon, and Passau; in Franconia and Thuringia, Würzburg, Eichstätt, Buraburg near Fritzlar, and Erfurt. To facilitate missionary work farther north, especially among the Saxons, he sought a suitable spot for the location of a monastery. He chose for this mission St. Sturmius, who, after journeying far and wide, found an appropriate place in the great forest of Buchonia, in the district of Grabfeld on the Fulda. Boniface sanctioned this choice of a location, and petitioned Carloman, to whom the country round about belonged, to grant him the site for a monastery. Carloman yielded to the saint’s request, and also induced the Frankish nobles who had estates in the vicinity to bestow a part of them on the Church. On 12 March, 744, St. Sturmius took solemn possession of the land, and raised the cross…

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Pope St. Damasus I

Born about 304; died 11 December, 384.

His father, Antonius, was probably a Spaniard; the name of his mother, Laurentia, was not known until quite recently. Damasus seems to have been born at Rome; it is certain that he grew up there in the service of the church of the martyr St. Laurence. He was elected pope in October, 366, by a large majority, but a number of over-zealous adherents of the deceased Liberius rejected him, chose the deacon Ursinus (or Ursicinus), had the latter irregularly consecrated, and resorted to much violence and bloodshed in order to seat him in the Chair of Peter. Many details of this scandalous conflict are related in the highly prejudiced “Libellus Precum” (P.L., XIII, 83-107), a petition to the civil authority on the part of Faustinus and Marcellinus, two anti-Damasan presbyters (cf. also Ammianus Marcellinus, Rer. Gest., XXVII, c. iii). Valentinian recognized Damasus and banished (367) Ursinus to Cologne, whence he was…

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St. María de las Maravillas de Jesús Pidal y Chico de Guzmán was born in Madrid, Spain, on 4 November 1891.

Twenty-two year old María Maravillas Pidal y Chico de Guzmán in 1914.

Twenty-two year old María Maravillas Pidal y Chico de Guzmán in 1914.

She was the daughter of Luis Pidal y Mon, Marquis of Pidal, and Cristina Chico de Guzmán y Munoz. At the time her father was the Spanish ambassador to the Holy See and she grew up in a devoutly Catholic family.

She made a vow of chastity at age of five and devoted herself to many charitable works. After coming into contact with the writings of St John of the Cross and St Teresa of Jesus, she entered the Carmelite monastery of El Escorial in 1920. Four years later, Sr. Maravillas and three other religious founded a Carmel in Cerro de los Angeles, where she made her solemn profession that same year. The monastery quickly grew and in 1933 she made a foundation in Kottayam, India. From this Carmel other foundations were made in India…

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December 12 – Tancred

December 10, 2018

Tancred

Prince of Antioch, born about 1072; died at Antioch, 12 Dec., 1112. He was the son of Marquess Odo and Emma, probably the daughter of Robert Guiscard. He took the Cross in 1096 with the Norman lords of Southern Italy and joined the service of his uncle Bohemund. Having disembarked at Arlona (Epirus), they marched towards Constantinople, and Tancred soon attracted attention by his activity, bravery, and somewhat undisciplined zeal; according to his biographer, Raoul de Caen, he was noted also for his humanity and kindness towards the defenceless. He brilliantly repulsed the Byzantine army which attacked him as he was crossing the Vardar (28 Feb., 1097) from which time Tancred became and remained the bitter enemy of the Greeks. Unlike Bohemund, he was the only one of all the leaders who refused to take the oath of fidelity demanded by Alexis Comnenus. He played an important part in the siege of Nicæa, and later, during the difficult march through Asia Minor, he led the way southwards and captured Tarsus which Baldwin tried in vain to wrest from him (Sept., 1097). While Baldwin advanced towards the Euphrates, Tancred seized the towns of Cilicia. He took an active part also in the siege of Antioch. In the march on Jerusalem he commanded the vanguard, and on 15 July, 1099, he entered the city, after making a breach in the gate of St. Stephen. He vainly endeavoured to save the lives of 300 Mussulmans who had taken refuge in the Mosque of Omar (Templum Domini). On the other hand he looted the treasures amassed in that building and distributed them among his knights. He received from Godfrey de Bouillon, who had been selected over him as king, the fiefs of Tiberias and Caïfa. When Bohemund was captured by the Turks in July, 1100, Tancred assumed the government of the Principality of Antioch, and extended its boundaries at the expense of the Turks and the Greeks. During the war between Bohemund and Alexis Comnenus (1104-08), Tancred defended both the Principality of Antioch and the Courtship of Edessa; he also strengthened the Christian power in those districts, and refused to recognize the Treaty of Durazzo by which Bohemund had ceded the suzerainty of Antioch to the emperor. A skilled politician, he knew how to placate the Greeks and issued Greek money on which he is represented adorned with gold and jewels, wearing a turban surmounted by a cross.

RAOUL DE CAEN, Gesta Tancredi (the author went to Palestine in 1107 and was attached to the army of Tancred) in Hist. Occid. des Croisades, III, 537-601; SCHLUMBERGER, Numismatique de l’Orient latin (Paris, 1878), 45; DE SAULCY, Tancrède in Biblioth. Ecole des Chartes (1843); O. DE SYDOW, Tankred (Leipzig, 1880); REY, Hist. des princes d’Antioche in Revue Orient Latin (1896), 334; KUGLER, Boemund u. Tankred (Tübingen, 1862); CHALANDON, Essai sur le régne d’Alexis Comnène (Paris, 1900); STEVENSON, The Crusaders in the East (Cambridge, 1907).

LOUIS BRÉHIER (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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by Cesar Franco

Pope Pius XII gave Our Lady of Guadalupe the title of “Empress of the Americas” in 1945. Since December 12 is the feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, this is a propitious moment to recall how She reigns over our nation from Heaven, protecting and guiding us with Motherly solicitude and tenderness. The constant miracle memorialized on Saint Juan Diego’s tilma and the context of the apparitions remind us that Our Lady is victorious over the serpent, intervenes in history and is eager to intercede for those who seek Her intercession in this vale of tears…

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St. Lucy

A virgin and martyr of Syracuse in Sicily, whose feast is celebrated by Latins and Greeks alike on 13 Dec. According to the traditional story, she was born of rich and noble parents about the year 283. Her father was of Roman origin, but his early death left her dependent upon her mother, whose name, Eutychia, seems to indicate that she came of Greek stock. Like so many of the early martyrs, Lucy had consecrated her virginity to God, and she hoped to devote all her worldly goods to the service of the poor. Her mother was not so single-minded, but an occasion offered itself when Lucy could carry out her generous resolutions. The fame of the virgin-martyr Agatha, who had been executed fifty-two years before in the Decian persecution, was attracting numerous visitors to her relics at Catania, not fifty miles from Syracuse, and many miracles had been wrought through her intercession. Eutychia was therefore persuaded to make a pilgrimage to Catania, in the hope of being cured or a haemorrhage, from which she had been suffering for several years. There she was in fact cured, and Lucy, availing herself of the opportunity, persuaded her mother to allow her to distribute a great part of her riches among the poor…
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December 13 – St. Odilia

December 10, 2018

St. Odilia

Patroness of Alsace, born at the end of the seventh century; died about 720. According to a trustworthy statement, apparently taken from an earlier life, she was the daughter of the Frankish lord Adalrich (Aticus, Etik) and his wife Bereswinda, who had large estates in Alsace. She founded the convent of Hohenburg (Odilienberg) in Alsace, to which Charlemagne granted immunity, confirmed 9 March, 837 by Louis the Pious who endowed the foundation (Böhmer-Muhlbacher, “Regesta Imperii”, I, 866, 933)…

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St. Jane Frances de Chantal

St. Jane Frances de ChantalBorn at Dijon, France, 28 January, 1572; died at the Visitation Convent Moulins, 13 December, 1641.

Her father was president of the Parliament of Burgundy, and leader of the royalist party during the League that brought about the triumph of the cause of Henry IV. In 1592 she married Baron de Chantal, and lived in the feudal castle of Bourbilly. She restored order in the household, which was on the brink of ruin, and brought back prosperity. During her husband’s absence at the court, or with the army, when reproached for her extremely sober manner of dressing, her reply was: “The eyes which I must please are a hundred miles from here”. She found more than once that God blessed with miracles the care she gave the suffering members of Christ. St. Francis de Sales’s eulogy of her characterizes her life at Bourbilly and everywhere else: “In Madame de Chantal I have found the perfect woman, whom Solomon had difficulty in finding in Jerusalem”. Baron de Chantal was accidently killed by an arquebus while out shooting in 1601. Left a widow at twenty-eight, with four children, the broken-hearted baroness took a vow of chastity. In all her prayers she besought God to send her a guide and God, in a vision, showed her the spiritual director He held in reserve for her…

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Pope Callistus II

Pope Callistus IIDate of birth unknown; died 13 December, 1124. His reign, beginning 1 February, 1119, is signalized by the termination of the Investiture controversy which, begun in the time of Gregory VII, had raged with almost unabated bitterness during the last quarter of the eleventh century and the opening years of the twelfth. Guido, as he was called before his elevation to the papacy, was the son of Count William of Burgundy, and both by his father’s and mother’s side was closely connected with nearly all the royal houses of Europe. His brother Hugh had been appointed Archbishop of Besancon, and he himself was named Archbishop of Vienne (1088), and afterwards appointed papal legate in France by Paschal II. During Guido’s tenure in this office, Paschal II, yielding to the threats of Henry V, was induced to issue the “Privilegium” (1111) by which he yielded up much of what had been claimed by Gregory VII, but these concessions were received with violent opposition and nowhere more so than in France, where the opposition was led by Guido, the papal legate. The latter was present at the Lateran Synod (1112), and on his return to France convoked an assembly of the French and Burgundian bishops at Vienne (1112), where the investiture of the clergy was denounced as heretical, and sentence of excommunication pronounced against Henry V because he had dared to extort from the pope by violence an agreement opposed to the interests of the Church. These decrees were sent to Paschal II with a request for confirmation, which they received in general terms, 20 October, 1112 (Hardouin, VI, 2, 1916)…

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The Name Change

December 6, 2018

Philip II of Spain by Antonio Moro

The King gave the final order. That two days afterwards, that is to say on the 1st of October, Jeromín was to be established in Valladolid with the Quijadas in a house which Doña Magdalena owned opposite that of the Conde de Rivadeo, which was henceforth to be the residence of the new prince; and that on the 2nd, at midday, Luis Quijada was secretly to bring Jeromín to the Palace, so that after dinner the King could present him to the Princess Juana and Prince Carlos, and acknowledge him as a brother before all the Court. The time and place to publish this acknowledgment throughout the kingdom would be determined later.

The King and Quijada talked for more than an hour, walking under the shade of the guardian oak trees, and when they emerged into the light not the perspicacity of even such an accomplished courtier as the Duque de Alba could have guessed from their faces what had passed between them. On reaching Jeromín and the Duque the King said to Quijada, “It will now be necessary to take the bandage off the boy’s eyes.” Then, turning to Jeromín, he asked him pleasant and even joking questions, and, as if recollecting something, all at once he said very kindly, “And with all this, Sir Peasant, you have never even told me your name.” “Jeromín,” answered the boy. “He was a great saint, but it must be altered. And do you know who your father was?”

Don Fernando Álvarez de Toledo, III Duke de Alba Painted by Titian

Jeromín blushed up to his eyes and looked at the King, half indignant and half tearful, as it seemed to him an affront which had no answer. D. Philip then was touched, and putting his hand on the boy’s shoulder, said with simple majesty, “Courage, my child, as I can tell you. The Emperor, my lord and father, was also yours, and for this I recognise and love you as a brother.” And he tenderly embraced him without other witnesses than Quijada and the Duque de Alba. The huntsmen saw the scene from afar off, without realising what was happening. The baying of the hounds and gay fanfare on the horns announced in the distance that the hunters were returning after a successful chase.

Stupefied by this revelation Jeromín got on his horse, Luis Quijada holding his stirrup. On the homeward journey to Villagarcia he only once opened his lips, and turning round to Quijada, who followed, asked, “And my aunt, does she know?” “Everything,” answered Quijada.

Luis Quijada

Jeromín hurried his steps as if he would be late getting to the castle, and running through the courts and up the stairs, he arrived at the parlour, opening and slamming the doors. Doña Magdalena was there alone and very pale. The child went to her, and took her hand to kiss it. “Aunt! Aunt!” “My lord, your Highness is no nephew of mine,” answered the lady. And she tried to kiss his hands, and set him in her big chair while she sat on the carpet.

Doña Magdalena de Ulloa

But the child, beside himself, cried with great energy that made his voice, all choked with tears, quite hoarse: “No! No! My aunt, my aunt, my mother.” And he kissed her tearfully, miserable and angry all at the same time, as one who cries for something lost through his own fault, and by force made her sit in the chair, and would not be silent or calm until he sat at her feet with his head leaning against her knee, making her promise a thousand times that she would always be his aunt, and that she would never leave off being his mother.

Don Juan of Austria by Jorge de la Rúa at the Glasgow Museums.

This all happened on a Thursday, and the following Monday, which was the 2nd of October, the acknowledgment of Jeromín took place in the Palace of Valladolid, as the King, D. Philip, had arranged. It is related thus in a manuscript, quoted by Gachard in the Maggliabecchiana library in Florence:

“Thursday, the 8th of September, it reached the lords of the Holy Office that the King would not go before he had seen the act, and so then they had it proclaimed for the 8th of October. And thus the King went to la Spina, and there they brought his half-brother, and he was pleased to see him, as he is handsome and sensible, and he ordered that he should be brought secretly to his house. And thus, the following Monday, he made everyone in the Palace recognise him as his brother, and embraced and kissed him, then his sister, then his son, and then the rest of the black cloaks.”

Don Juan of Austria pictured with the Golden Fleece.

It is, therefore, not true what Vander Hammen says of Philip giving his brother the Golden Fleece, either at Torozos or in the Palace of Valladolid. What really happened at this second interview was that the King gave his brother the family name, and changed his name of Jeromín for that of John, creating that which has descended to posterity surrounded by rays of genius and glory—Don John of Austria.

Rev. Fr. Luis Coloma, The Story of Don John of Austria, trans. Lady Moreton, (New York: John Lane Company, 1912), Book I, Ch. XVI, pp. 91-93

Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 655

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By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

In today’s society, at least as it pertains to the natural aging process, “young” is “in”—“old” is “out.” Everyone wants to appear young.

There is a strange anomaly here. While it is fashionable to collect antiques and even vintage automobiles, a deep-rooted sentiment of displeasure exists among those for whom old-age is still far distant. For women and men alike, even the appearance of “looking older” is to be avoided at all costs.

Do you doubt it? Look around you and perhaps at yourself.

Nowhere is this “ageless” phenomenon more evident than in the field of women’s cosmetics. Not only is the intent to reduce the appearance of age as much as the implacable march of time will permit but to halt this process somewhere around the adolescent years. With men, hair coloring becomes the elixir of a youthful appearance.

Winston Churchill Churchill in Morning Dress on His Wedding Day.

This need to be “young” spills over into clothing styles and colors, attitudes, gestures, language, topics of conversations—everything is explored and exploited to maintain this impression of eternal youth. More and more, the typical clothing for the mature age—conservative styles and discreet colors—have been replaced by the sporty look, bright colors and bold lines.

This look is more evident at the beaches or tourist havens where one can find serious professors, well-known politicians, shrewd bankers and business people dressed exactly like their grandchildren: barefoot with shirts and shorts more suited for toddlers than for those so close to the age of tottering. Their hairy arms and bony legs belie the wry smiles on their aged faces and the artificial brightness forcibly maintained in the tired eyes. In every aspect one can see the tremendous effort necessary to hide an age that pertinaciously attest itself, affirms itself, proclaims itself throughout all their pores.

Why is this so? Above all, because the pagan men of our time live for pleasure—and the age for pleasure par excellence is youth. This is true at least for those who do not understand that youth, as a certain author wrote, was not made for pleasure but for heroism.

There is more, yet. While old age can represent the fullness of the soul, it most certainly shows the decadence of the body. Now, since modern man is a materialist shutting his eyes to everything spiritual, the course of aging naturally causes him horror.

In reality, however, if a man knew during his lifetime how to grow not only in experience but in penetration of spirit, in common sense, in strength of soul and in wisdom, his mind would acquire in old age a splendor and a nobility that would shine in his face and would be the true beauty of his latter years. His physique might suggest a reminder of the closeness of death, but in compensation his soul would emit sparks of immortality.

Sr. Winston ChurchillA memorable example of all this in our century was Winston Churchill to whose intelligence shining with lucidity, to whose iron will a great people entrusted the most arduous of tasks—to restore a decadent empire.

The first picture shows him at age 34. He is indisputably a very handsome, intelligent man on his way up. However, not even his gaze has the profundity, nor his bearing the assurance, nor his countenance the Herculean strength of the photograph of Churchill in his old age shown in the second picture.

His youth is undoubtedly gone and elegance along with it. His soul, though, grew while time implacably marked his body. This soul, by itself, was the column upon which an entire empire rested. In the mere natural order, this is the glory and beauty of old age.

How much fuller and more decisive these commentaries would be if we were to consider the supernatural aspects of the matter.

 

Ambiences, Costumes, Civilizations, “Catolicismo” Number 12; December 1951. Also, reprinted in TFP Newsletter, Vol. 5, #9, 1991.

 

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December 7 – The People Acclaimed Him as Bishop Even Though He Was Unbaptized

December 6, 2018

St. Ambrose Bishop of Milan from 374 to 397; born probably 340, at Trier, Arles, or Lyons; died 4 April, 397. He was one of the most illustrious Fathers and Doctors of the Church, and fitly chosen, together with St. Augustine, St. John Chrysostom, and St. Athanasius, to uphold the venerable Chair of the Prince […]

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December 8 – The Immaculate Conception: The Celebration of Privilege

December 6, 2018

Wherefore, in humility and fasting, we unceasingly offered our private prayers as well as the public prayers of the Church to God the Father through his Son, that he would deign to direct and strengthen our mind by the power of the Holy Spirit. In like manner did we implore the help of the entire […]

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December 8 – To overcome his repugnance, he bound himself by vow

December 6, 2018

St. Noel Chabanel A Jesuit missionary among the Huron Indians, born in Southern France, 2 February, 1613; slain by a renegade Huron, 8 December, 1649. Chabanel entered the Jesuit novitiate at Toulouse at the age of seventeen, and was professor of rhetoric in several colleges of the society in the province of Toulouse. He was […]

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December 9 – Banker and Saint

December 6, 2018

St. Peter Fourier Known as LE BON PÈRE DE MATTAINCOURT (Good Father of Mattaincourt), born at Mirecourt, Lorraine, 30 Nov., 1565 died at Gray, Haute-Saône, 9 Dec., 1640. At fifteen he was sent to the University of Pont-à-Mousson. His piety and learning led many noble families to ask him to educate their sons. He became […]

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December 10 – To protest the emperor, he paid special honor images and relics

December 6, 2018

Pope St. Gregory III (Reigned 731-741.) Pope St. Gregory III was the son of a Syrian named John. The date of his birth is not known. His reputation for learning and virtue was so great that the Romans elected him pope by acclamation, when he was accompanying the funeral procession of his predecessor, 11 February, […]

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December 10 – The First Pope to Live in a Palace

December 6, 2018

Pope St. Miltiades The year of his birth is not known; he was elected pope in either 310 or 311; died 10 or 11 January, 314. After the banishment of Pope Eusebius, the Roman See was vacant for some time, probably because of the complications which has arisen on account of the apostates (lapsi), and […]

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December 4 – Saint Barbara

December 3, 2018

Saint Barbara Virgin and Martyr. There is no reference to St. Barbara contained in the authentic early historical authorities for Christian antiquity, neither does her name appear in the original recension of St. Jerome’s martyrology. Veneration of the saint was common, however, from the seventh century. At about this date there were in existence legendary […]

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December 4 – Saint Osmund, founder of the Cathedral system of Church governance

December 3, 2018

Saint Osmund Bishop of Salisbury, died 1099; his feast is kept on 4 December. Osmund held an exalted position in Normandy, his native land, and according to a late fifteenth-century document was the son of Henry, Count of Séez, and Isabella, daughter of Robert, Duke of Normandy, who was the father of William the Conqueror […]

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December 4 – From a Muslim court, he opposed the Christian Emperor…and won!

December 3, 2018

St. John Damascene Born at Damascus, about 676; died some time between 754 and 787. The only extant life of the saint is that by John, Patriarch of Jerusalem, which dates from the tenth century (P.G. XCIV, 429-90). This life is the single source from which have been drawn the materials of all his biographical […]

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December 5 – Noble matron faithful unto death

December 3, 2018

St. Crispina A martyr of Africa who suffered during the Diocletian persecution; born at Thagara in the Province of Africa; died by beheading at Thebeste in Numidia, 5 December, 304. Crispina belonged to a distinguished family and was a wealthy matron with children. At the time of the persecution she was brought before the proconsul […]

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December 6 – Martyr of the Muslims

December 3, 2018

St. Peter Paschal, Bishop and Martyr This saint was born in Valencia, Spain, in 1227, and descended of the ancient family of the Paschals, which had edified the Church by the triumphs of five glorious martyrs, which it produced under the Moors. Peter’s parents were virtuous and exceedingly charitable; and St. Peter Nolasco often lodged […]

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December 6 – Good St. Nicholas

December 3, 2018

Life of Saint Nicholas from Legenda Aurea by Jacobus de Voragine Here beginneth the Life of Saint Nicholas the Bishop. Stained glass window of St. Nicholas in Joinville, France. Nicholas is said of Nichos, which is to say victory, and of laos, people, so Nicholas is as much as to say as victory of people, […]

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Charette’s brave Zouaves

November 29, 2018

Upon which I galloped back to my Artillery reserve, where I had placed my Zouaves, and cried to Charette: ‘Colonel, give me one of your battalions.’ There were two. Then, addressing those brave Zouaves, I said: ‘There are some cowards down there who refuse to march, and who will lose the whole army. Try to […]

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Sister Anuarita of Bafwabaka: A Mary Goretti of Central Africa

November 29, 2018

The present Soviet-Cuban aggression against the African continent has been prepared by decades of infiltration, propaganda, and communist inspired terrorist activity. The lives of the African people have been systematically disrupted, the land has been devastated, and religious and shrines of the Church have been desecrated. These assaults have at times, by way of reaction, […]

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November 30 – His name means manhood, or valour

November 29, 2018

St. Andrew The name “Andrew” (Gr., andreia, manhood, or valour), like other Greek names, appears to have been common among the Jews from the second or third century B.C. St. Andrew, the Apostle, son of Jonah, or John (Matt., xvi, 17; John, i, 42), was born in Bethsaida of Galilee (John, i, 44). He was […]

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December 1 – The Virgin Mary appears to General Gaston de Sonis after his army’s losses at Patay promising that France would survive

November 29, 2018

On the night of December 1 [1870], the Zouaves were ordered to advance to Patay [France], where Joan of Arc had won a renowned victory against the English. [General Louis-Gaston de] Sonis asked [Colonel Athanase de] Charette, who had no flag of his own, to lend him the Zouaves’. This banner had a curious history….  […]

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December 1 – Bl. Ralph Sherwin

November 29, 2018

Bl. Ralph Sherwin English martyr, born 1550 at Rodesley, near Longford, Derbyshire; died at Tyburn, 1 December, 1581. In 1568 Sir William Petre nominated him to one of the eight fellowships which he had founded at Exeter College, Oxford, probably acting under the influence of the martyr’s uncle, John Woodward, who from 1556 to 1566 […]

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December 1 – Billionaire Saint

November 29, 2018

Saint Eligius (French: Eloi), Bishop of Noyon-Tournai, born at Chaptelat near Limoges, France, circa 590, of Roman parents, Eucherius and Terrigia; died at Noyon, December 1, 660. His father, recognizing unusual talent in his son, sent him to the noted goldsmith Abbo, master of the mint at Limoges. Later Eligius went to Neustria, where he […]

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December 1 – He Hid Priests in His Manorhouse

November 29, 2018

Blessed Richard Langley Layman and martyr, b. probably at Grimthorpe, Yorks, England, date unknown; d. at York, 1 Dec., 1586. From his father, Richard Langley, of Rathorpe Hall, Walton, he probably inherited Rathorpe, but for the greater part of his life continued to reside on his estate at Ousethorpe, in the East Riding. His mother […]

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December 1 – The Queen bade him ask for what he would

November 29, 2018

Edmund Campion, English Jesuit Saint and martyr; he was the son and namesake of a Catholic bookseller, and was born in London, 25 Jan., 1540; executed at Tyburn, 1 Dec., 1581. A city company sent the promising child to a grammar school and to Christ Church Hospital. When Mary Tudor entered London in state as […]

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December 2 – Cause of Our Joy

November 29, 2018

Our Lady of Joy (aka Notre Dame de Liesse, or Causa Nostrae Laetitiae) In 1134 three Knights of the Order of Saint John of Jerusalem, prisoners of the Muslims in Egypt, miraculously found or received in their prison a statue of Our Lady, which they named Our Lady of Joy, or Notre Dame de Liesse. […]

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December 2 – St. Chromatius

November 29, 2018

St. Chromatius Bishop of Aquileia, died about 406-407. He was probably born at Aquileia, and in any case grew up there. He became a priest of that church and about 387 or 388, after the death of Valerianus, bishop of that important city. He was one of the most celebrated prelates of his time and […]

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December 3 – St. Francis Xavier, Apostle of the Indies

November 29, 2018

St. Francis Xavier Born in the Castle of Xavier near Sanguesa, in Navarre, 7 April, 1506; died on the Island of Sancian near the coast of China, 2 December, 1552. In 1525, having completed a preliminary course of studies in his own country, Francis Xavier went to Paris, where he entered the collège de Sainte-Barbe. […]

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November 27 – The king who made France “First-born daughter of the Church”

November 26, 2018

Clovis Son of Childeric, King of the Salic Franks; born in the year 466; died at Paris, 27 November, 511. He succeeded his father as the King of the Franks of Tournai in 481. His kingdom was probably one of the States that sprang from the division of Clodion’s monarchy like those of Cambrai, Tongres […]

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November 27 – St. Maximus of Riez

November 26, 2018

St. Maximus, Bishop of Riez, Confessor About the Year 460. ST. MAXIMUS was born in Provence at Decomer, now called Chateau-Redon, near Digne. His truly Christian parents saw him baptized in his infancy, and brought him up in the love and practice of virtue, and an enemy to its bane, the pleasure of the senses, […]

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November 28 – December 27 – Siege of Jasna Góra

November 26, 2018

Lessons in Psychological Warfare from the Siege of Jasna Góra, November 28-December 27, 1655 This account of the siege of  Częstochowa is based on the Memoirs of the Siege of Czestochowa by Father Augustine Kordecki (Pamietnik oblezenia Częstochowy, edited and with a preface by Jan Tokarski, London, Veritas, 1956.) Written by Friar Kordecki in response […]

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November 28 – Count Louis de Baude Frontenac

November 26, 2018

Count Louis de Baude Frontenac A governor of New France, born at Paris, 1662; died at Quebec, 28 Nov., 1698. His father was captain of the royal castle of St-Germain-en-laye; his mother, née Phelypeaux, was the daughter of the king’s secretary of state; Louis XIII was his godfather. By his valour and skill he won […]

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November 29 – The coronation of St. Louis IX of France

November 26, 2018

Traditionally, new sacred music was composed for a coronation. The motet…which was sung for the anointing of Louis IX has come down to us. It was called Gaude, felix Francia…. The boy who was to be anointed and crowned was already on a platform built in front of the chancel, surrounded by the great lords […]

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November 29 – St. Saturninus

November 26, 2018

St. Saturninus was, says Tillemont, one of the most illustrious martyrs France has given to the Church. We possess only his Acts, which are very old, since they were utilized by St. Gregory of Tours. He was the first bishop of Toulouse, whither he went during the consulate of Decius and Gratus (250). Whether there […]

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November 29 – Grandson of the one who defeated Charles Martel in battle

November 26, 2018

St. Radbod, Bishop of Utrecht, Confessor This holy prelate was, by his father, of noble French extraction; and, by his mother, Radbod, the last king or prince of the Frisons was his great grandfather, whose name was given him by his mother. The first tincture of learning and piety he received under the tuition of […]

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St. Ignatius in London as the storm gathers

November 22, 2018

In the summer of 1530, Ignatius came to London. That year was a fatal one to England. The question of the divorce was agitating not this country alone, but the whole Christian world. The most celebrated Universities were consulted on the subject, and by means of bribery and intrigue, not to say open violence, favorable […]

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Moslem Seville surrenders to Saint Ferdinand

November 22, 2018

The Moors had no choice but to accept the iron will of that King Ferdinand, who, like a curse of Allah, crossed Andalusia exterminating Islam. The ambassadors returned with broader powers to act, and then Don Ferdinand received them. After they had been conducted to his tent, they found him waiting surrounded by his whole […]

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November 23 – Blessed Margaret of Savoy

November 22, 2018

Bl. Margaret of Savoy Marchioness of Montferrat, born at Pignerol in 1382; died at Alba, 23 November, 1464. She was the only daughter of Louis of Savoy, Prince of Achaia, and of Bonne, daughter of Amadeus VI, Count of Savoy, and was given in marriage in 1403 to Theodore, Marquis of Montferrat, a descendant of […]

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November 23 – St. Trudo

November 22, 2018

St. Trudo (also called TRON, TROND, TRUDON, TRUTJEN, TRUYEN). Apostle of Hasbein in Brabant; died 698 (or perhaps 693). Feast 23 November. He was the son of Blessed Adela of the family of the dukes of Austrasia. Devoted from his earliest youth to the service of God, Trudo came to St. Remaclus, Bishop of Liège […]

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November 24 – Intrepid missionaries

November 22, 2018

Joseph Marchand (August 17, 1803 – November 30, 1835) was a French missionary in Vietnam, and a member of the Paris Foreign Missions Society. Born August 17, 1803, in Passavant, in the Doubs department of France, in 1833 he joined the Lê Văn Khôi revolt by Lê Văn Khôi, son of the late governor of […]

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November 24 – Saint Joseph Mary Pignatelli, S.J.

November 22, 2018

(also known as St. Giuseppe Maria Pignatelli) Born 27 December, 1737, in Saragossa, Spain; died 11 November, 1811. His family was of Neapolitan descent and noble lineage. After finishing his early studies in the Jesuit College of Saragossa, he entered the Society of Jesus (8 May, 1753) notwithstanding his family’s opposition. On concluding his ecclesiastical […]

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November 25 – The day a 16 year old invalid and a handful of men defeated a huge professional army

November 22, 2018

The Battle of Montgisard was fought between the Ayyubids and the Kingdom of Jerusalem on November 25, 1177. The 16 year old King Baldwin IV, seriously afflicted by leprosy, led an out-numbered Christian force against the army of Saladin. The Islamic force was routed and their casualties were massive, only a fraction managed to flee […]

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November 25 – She Defied the Emperor

November 22, 2018

St. Catherine of Alexandria A virgin and martyr whose feast is celebrated in the Latin Church and in the various Oriental churches on 25 November, and who for almost six centuries was the object of a very popular devotion. Of noble birth and learned in the sciences, when only eighteen years old, Catherine presented herself […]

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Christ the King? Or Christ the President?

November 22, 2018

A heavenly King above all, but a King whose government is already exercised in this world. A King who by right possesses the supreme and full authority. The King makes laws, commands and judges. His sovereignty becomes effective when his subjects recognize his rights, and obey his laws. “Jesus Christ has rights over us all: […]

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November 25 & 26 – Blessed Hugh Taylor & Blessed Marmaduke Bowes

November 22, 2018

Blessed Hugh Taylor English martyr, born at Durham; hanged, drawn, and quartered at York, 25 (not 26) November, 1585. He arrived at Reims on 2 May, 1582, and having been ordained a priest was sent thence on the mission on 27 March, 1585. He was the first to suffer under the Statute 27 Eliz. c. […]

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