According to The Royal Household:

…members of The Royal Family joined in events to celebrate the Royal Air Force’s 100th Anniversary.

A ‘feu de joie’ (ceremonial gunfire) and a spectacular fly-past of 100 RAF aircraft illustrated the history the Force and showed just how far its aircraft have evolved in the past century.

In the afternoon, The Prince of Wales, Duchess of Cornwall, Duke of Cambridge, Duke of York, and Duke and Duchess of Sussex attended a reception at Buckingham Palace. The reception was an opportunity to meet RAF veterans, serving personnel and their families.

To read the entire announcement from The Royal Household, please click here.

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Pope St. Leo IV

(Reigned 847-55)

Pope St. Leo IVA Roman and the son of Radoald, was unanimously elected to succeed Sergius II, and as the alarming attack of the Saracens on Rome in 846 caused the people to fear for the safety of the city, he was consecrated (10 April, 847) without the consent of the emperor.

Leo received his early education at Rome in the monastery of St. Martin, near St. Peter’s. His pious behaviour attracted the notice of Gregory IV, who made him a subdeacon; and he was created Cardinal-Priest of the church of the Quatuor Coronati by Sergius II…

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Execution of Tsar Nicholas II and his family

Tsar Nicholas II of Russia with the family (left to right): Olga, Maria, Tsarina Alexandra Fyodorovna, Anastasia, Alexei, and Tatiana. Photo taken in 1913.

In the early hours of 17 July 1918, the royal family was awakened around 2:00 am, told to dress, and led down into a half-basement room at the back of the Ipatiev house. The pretext for this move was the family’s safety — that anti-Bolshevik forces were approaching Yekaterinburg, and the house might be fired upon. There are also unsubstantiated claims that the family was led to the basement under the pretense that family photographs would be made…

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The Sixteen Blessed Teresian Martyrs of Compiègne

Guillotined at the Place du Trône Renversé (now called Place de la Nation), Paris, 17 July, 1794. They are the first sufferers under the French Revolution on whom the Holy See has passed judgment, and were solemnly beatified 27 May, 1906. Before their execution they knelt and chanted the “Veni Creator”, as at a profession, after which they all renewed aloud their baptismal and religious vows. The novice was executed first and the prioress last. Absolute silence prevailed the whole time that the executions were proceeding. The heads and bodies of the martyrs were interred in a deep sand-pit about thirty feet square in a cemetery at Picpus. As this sand-pit was the receptacle of the bodies of 1298 victims of the Revolution, there seems to be no hope of their relics being recovered. Their names are as follows…

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St. Camillus de Lellis

Born at Bacchianico, Naples, 1550; died at Rome, 14 July, 1614.

He was the son of an officer who had served both in the Neapolitan and French armies. His mother died when he was a child, and he grew up absolutely neglected. When still a youth he became a soldier in the service of Venice and afterwards of Naples, until 1574, when his regiment was disbanded. While in the service he became a confirmed gambler, and in consequence of his losses at play was at times reduced to a condition of destitution. The kindness of a Franciscan friar induced him to apply for admission to that order, but he was refused. He then betook himself to Rome, where he obtained employment in the Hospital for Incurables. He was prompted to go there chiefly by the hope of a cure of abscesses in both his feet from which he had been long suffering. He was dismissed from the hospital on account of his quarrelsome disposition and his passion for gambling…

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Godfrey of Bouillon

Duke of Lower Lorraine and first King of Jerusalem, son of Eustache II, Count of Boulogne, and of Ida, daughter of Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine; born probably at Boulogne-sur-Mer, 1060; died at Jerusalem, 18 July, 1100 (according to a thirteenth-century chronicler, he was born at Baisy, in Brabant; see Haigneré, Mémoires lus à la Sorbonne, Paris, 1868, 213)…

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Saint Arnulf of Metz

Statesman, bishop under the Merovingians, born c. 580; died c. 640.

His parents belonged to a distinguished Frankish family, and lived in Austrasia, the eastern section of the kingdom founded by Clovis. In the school in which he was placed during his boyhood he excelled through his talent and his good behaviour. According to the custom of the age, he was sent in due time to the court of Theodebert II, King of Austrasia (595-612), to be initiated in the various branches of the government. Under the guidance of Gundulf, the Mayor of the Palace, he soon became so proficient that he was placed on the regular list of royal officers, and among the first of the kings ministers. He distinguished himself both as a military commander and in the civil administration; at one time he had under his care six distinct provinces. In due course Arnulf was married to a Frankish woman of noble lineage, by whom he had two sons, Anseghisel and Clodulf…

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Saint Hedwig, Queen of Poland

Born, 1371. Died, 17 July 1399 during child birth. Hedwig was the youngest daughter of King Louis I of Hungary. Because she was great-niece to King Casimir III of Poland, she became Queen of Poland in 1382 upon her father‘s death. She was engaged to William, Duke of Austria, whom she loved, but broke off the relationship in order to marry Jagiello, non-Christian Prince of Lithuania, for political reasons…

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St. Macrina the Younger

St. Macrina the Younger (fresco in Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev)

St. Macrina the Younger (fresco in Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev)

Born about 330; died 379. She was the eldest child of Basil the Elder and Emmelia, the granddaughter of St. Macrina the Elder, and the sister of the Cappadocian Fathers, Sts. Basil and Gregory of Nyssa. The last-mentioned has left us a biography of his sister in the form of a panegyric (“Vita Macrinae Junioris” in PG XLVI, 960 sq.). She received an excellent intellectual training, though one based more on the study of the Holy Bible than on that of profane literature. When she was but twelve years old, her father had already arranged a marriage for her with a young advocate of excellent family. Soon afterwards, however, her affianced husband died suddenly, and Macrina resolved to devote herself to a life of perpetual virginity and the pursuit of Christian perfection. She exercised great influence over the religious training of her younger brothers, especially St. Peter, afterwards Bishop of Sebaste, and through her St. Gregory received the greatest intellectual stimulation…

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St. Arsenius

Anchorite; born 354, at Rome; died 450, at Troe, in Egypt. Theodosius the Great having requested the Emperor Gratian and Pope Damasus to find him in the West a tutor for his son Arcadius, they made choice of Arsenius, a man well read in Greek literature, member of a noble Roman family, and said to have been a deacon of the Roman Church. He reached Constantinople in 383, and continued as tutor in the imperial family for eleven years, during the last three of which he also had charge of his pupil’s brother Honorius. Coming one day to see his children at their studies, Theodosius found them sitting while Arsenius talked to them standing. This he would not tolerate, and caused the teacher to sit and the pupils to stand. On his arrival at court Arsenius had been given a splendid establishment, and probably because the Emperor so desired, he lived in great pomp, but all the time felt a growing inclination to renounce the world…

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Blessed Hroznata of Bohemia

Founder of the Monasteries of Teplá and Chotěšov, born (c) 1170, died July 14, 1217.

In the happy reign of Premysl, – also called Ottacar, – king of Bohemia, among the other magnates of the kingdom the first place at court, next to the king’s magnificence, was held by Hroznata, the descendant of an illustrious and princely line. The high position conferred by his birth he so adorned by the beauty of his character and his virtues, being made more excellent by his judgment and bountiful natural gifts, that he was revered by all with ardent affection. Possessing not learning only, but abundance of worldly goods, he would relieve from his own resources the needs of the destitute around him with farsighted beneficence. He was the pious comforter of the sorrowing, the father of the orphan, the supporter of the afflicted, ever keeping unobserved beneath his military cloak the steadfast purpose of a holy life. He rendered to God the things which are God’s with devoted zeal: to his king the things which were the king’s, with loyal obedience: to every man his own, with affection according to his deserts…

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General Charles-François du Périer Dumouriez

“You see that I am annoyed,” said the Queen to Dumouriez¹ in Louis XVI’s presence; “I dare not go to the window looking into the garden. Last evening, needing a breath of air, I showed myself at the window facing the courtyard. A gunner belonging to the guard apostrophized me in an insulting way, and added: ‘What pleasure it would give me to have your head on the end of my bayonet! ‘In that frightful garden a man standing on a chair reads out horrors against us on one side, and on the other may be seen a soldier or a priest whom they are dragging through a pond, and crushing with blows and insults. Meantime, others are flying balloons or quietly strolling about. Ah! What a place! What a people!”

¹Charles-François du Périer Dumouriez

 

Marie Antoinette and The Downfall Of Royalty by Imbert de Saint-Amand, 1834-1900, Pg. 157.

Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 634

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By Prof. Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

We should not lose sight of the fact that even though God governs the universe and all beings, He desired that men be free, and also gave the angels an intellect and a [free] will. In spite of having been cast into Hell and condemned to suffer eternally, the devil still has his angelic intelligence and is endowed with a will. It is therefore the case to ask, with the intellectual data that we have, why he wants to make such a conspiracy [of egalitarianism]. First, what does he see and, second, what does he want; what motivates him to drive this whole conspiracy.

Studying this question is very important to us. For starters, we can affirm that the devil is the driving force of this conspiracy, and it is of the essence that we know where this motor is headed in order to figure out where this conspiracy will lead.

Above all, this is important for us to thoroughly understand that Gnosis, in the sense it should be understood, is so to speak the necessary pole towards which the conspiracy of the devil tends. In fact, due to the logical and ineluctable circumstances in which he finds himself, the devil must want a Gnostic humanity. He is not so interested in having humanity fall into just any heresy, but that humanity falls into the Gnostic heresy.

The Devil, Eternal Loser

Naturally, to understand this well, we must place ourselves before a preliminary consideration: the devil is an evil, defeated angel, placed in an utterly self-contradictory situation. He is contradiction, weakness, and defeat; he is the crushed one. God cast him from the height of his throne to the bottom of Hell. Although he continues to exist, his first contradiction is that he knows that God is God, worthy of all homage and adoration, but moved by a disordered self-love, the devil refuses to pay homage to God. The devil would not want to adore God even if God allowed him to. God does not allow it, and neither does the devil want to adore God. He is in Hell out of his own free and spontaneous will because he refused to accept a reality which, anthropomorphically speaking, enters through his pores.

Now, a being in such a position is as it were twisted, turned away from his right and true end, and oriented toward something which he knows is not his end. He knows that this is not right, that he does not merit self-adoration, but he wants it because he wants it. So we see that a formidable contradiction exists in the devil.

St. Michael Vanquishing Satan missal and book of hours, Lombardy c. 1385-1390

It is in function of this contradictory situation that we must seek an explanation for the devil’s plan for the whole [egalitarian] conspiratorial movement in the universe. Why would a being in such a contradictory situation want to disseminate this [Gnostic] heresy, and how can we understand his desire to carry out his entire plan when we see the profound contradiction in which he finds himself?

In order to better understand this, we must begin by recalling that the devil knows perfectly well that, ultimately, all that he does redounds to the glory of God; and that, in his ongoing combat against God, he is the eternally defeated one.

He is incapable of thinking, wanting or carrying out any action, of which the direct or indirect effect does not redound to the glory of God. So it is the case to ask: If the devil is driven by hatred of God (and he is incapable of doing anything except out of that hatred), would he not act more intelligently by maintaining himself perpetually inactive, perpetually immobile? Would this perpetual immobility not be a more effective means of diminishing the glory of God? How does one explain that he feels he is working against the glory of God with this conspiratorial plan?

Daydreaming

For our comprehension of this whole plan of the devil, I thought it interesting to develop a theory very much related to competition as it takes place in the minds of men. It is called the daydreaming theory.

When he was on the death bed and brought his bags filled with gold coins and exclaimed, passing his hands on them “alas, must I leave you my dear lambs”

It is not an explanation of dreaming while sleeping. Here we refer to “dream” only in its analogical sense, meaning daydreaming, this mania some people have of fantasizing with open eyes, “meeting” people their never met, thinking they are living a life which in truth they are not, doing things which they are not doing, or imagining people that they know as being what they are not.

Daydreamers picture themselves in situations which are imaginary, and function in an unreal world.

There are a number of situations which can give rise to this. For example, a person who recognizes the fact that he is poor, or that he is unintelligent, or lacking social graces, etc. but fantasizes that he is a genius, most picturesque, most interesting, yet surrounded by insignificant people, fools who do not give him his just due. He is, then, a kind of genius ignored by everyone and living among “turnips” and “onions”, and yet fantasizing, with his head in the clouds, that he is in a world in which he is appreciated, etc. At this point comes in a full-fledged ‘sister soul’, a perfect friend, a perfect spouse, etc. And he thinks to himself, “If only my father and mother were different! If only my brothers and friends were different! And above all, if only I could find a young lady who understood me and became one with me entirely, etc.”

A dreaming boy blowing bubbles.

Or, this person might have a mania for money. He would thus imagine himself in a stock exchange making big deals, earning millions, surrounded by men who highly admire him. A super genius! If not this, then he is a great speaker, whom audiences and galleries applaud! Or then he is most refined, most elegant, most noble; with but a glance, all multitudes fall at his feet.

There are all kinds of manias. Miseries such as this exist across the whole spectrum. And it so happens that this person begins to fantasize, to daydream of a life which is not real life.

 Daydreaming Is a Means to Escape Misfortune

What gives rise to these fantasies? In general, they begin with a serious and lasting misfortune. Small misfortunes do not produce fantasies. In general, daydreaming is caused by a serious misfortune, even if unreal. And it must be a lasting misfortune, for if the person perceives that it will soon pass, he does not fantasize about it but thinks about reality. But when he is stuck in a bad situation and sees that it will endure, for him (and for many) the way out is to fantasize.

Fantasy by William Savage Cooper.

A man thus moved to fantasize may give vent to such fantasies in various ways. For example, a man may begin to fantasize with very defined, articulated things, or he may fantasize about music; there is nothing articulate about his music, yet he composes something he dreams of as a means to escape a given situation that he does not want to accept. He creates a fantasy in which he lives.

Imagine a situation such as this: a layman passes close to a confessional and inadvertently hears a part of someone’s confession. As a result, he is bound by the sacramental seal of confession. Now, because of a certain circumstance, he is placed in a situation where that seal prevents him from revealing the author of a crime of which he is accused. And he ends up going to jail.

So this man is facing a very serious evil: he is condemned, loses his freedom, is sent to a penitentiary, and has lost his honor in the eyes of all. Everything about his situation is most unpleasant.

What is the sound reaction, and what are the unwholesome reactions that a man can have in such a case?

To be continued

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Godfrey of Bouillon

Godfrey of Bouillon

The attack began the night of July 13, [1099,] and the defenders let loose a hail of stones and rivers of Greek fire…. The battle hung in the balance during the morning hours of July 15. Archers shot blazing firebrands to drive the defenders from the walls, but the siege towers were battered and burned. Toward the end of morning it appeared that the attack was doomed…

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St. Henry II

German King and Holy Roman Emperor, son of Duke Henry II (the Quarrelsome) and of the Burgundian Princess Gisela; b. 972; d. in his palace of Grona, at Gottingen, 13 July, 1024.

Like his predecessor, Otto III, he had the literary education of his time. In his youth he had been destined for the priesthood. Therefore he became acquainted with ecclesiastical interests at an early age…

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Blessed Marie-Azélie Guérin Martin

St. Marie-Azélie Guérin Martin

St. Marie-Azélie “Zélie” Martin née Guérin (23 December 1831 – 28 August 1877) was a French laywoman and the mother of Saint Thérèse de Lisieux. Her husband was Blessed Louis Martin.

Marie-Azélie Guérin was born in Saint-Denis-sur-Sarthon, Orne, France and was the second daughter of Isidore Guérin and Louise-Jeanne Macé. She had an older sister, Marie-Louise, who became a Visitandine nun, and a younger brother, Isidore, who was a pharmacist. Her maternal family were from the Madré, in the neighbouring department of Mayenne, where her grandfather Louis Macé was baptised on the 16th March 1778…

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Saint MildthrythSaint Mildthryth (694–716 or 733), also Mildrith, Mildryth or Mildred, was an Anglo-Saxon abbess.

Mildthryth was the daughter of King Merewalh of Magonsaete, a sub-kingdom of Mercia, and Eormenburh (Saint Eormenburga), herself the daughter of King Æthelberht of Kent, and as such appearing in the so-called Kentish royal legend.

Her sisters Milburh (Saint Milburga of Much Wenlock) and Mildgytha (Saint Mildgyth) were also considered saints. Goscelin, probably relying on a now-lost history of the rulers of the Kingdom of Kent, wrote a hagiography of Mildthryth.

Mildthryth’s maternal family had close ties to the Merovingian rulers of Gaul, and Mildthryth is said to have been educated at the prestigious Merovingian royal abbey of Chelles. She entered the abbey of Minster-in-Thanet, which her mother had earlier established, and of which she became abbess by 694. Suggesting that ties to Gaul were maintained, a number of dedications to Mildthryth exist in the Pas-de-Calais, including at Millam. Mildthryth died at Minster-in-Thanet and was buried there.

Her remains were translated to St Augustine’s Abbey, Canterbury in 1030, the translation is commemorated on 18 May. Mildthryth was apparently followed as abbess by Edburga of Minster-in-Thanet, correspondent of Saint Boniface.

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Bl. Jacopo de Voragine

(Also DI VIRAGGIO).

Archbishop of Genoa and medieval hagiologist, born at Viraggio (now Varazze), near Genoa, about 1230; died 13 July, about 1298. In 1244 he entered the Order of St. Dominic, and soon became famous for his piety, learning, and zeal in the care of souls. His fame as a preacher spread throughout Italy, and he was called upon to preach from the most celebrated pulpits of Lombardy. After teaching Holy Scripture and theology in various houses of his order in Northern Italy, he was elected provincial of Lombardy in 1267, holding this office until 1286, in which year he become definitor of the Lombard province of Dominicans. In the latter capacity he attended a chapter at Lucca in 1288, and another at Ferrara, in 1290. In 1288 he was commissioned by Pope Nicholas IV to free the Genoese from the ban of the Church, which they had incurred for assisting the Sicilians in their revolt against the King of Naples. When Archbishop Charles Bernard of Genoa died, in 1286, the metropolitan chapter of Genoa proposed Jacopo de Voragine as his successor. Upon his refusal to accept the dignity, Obizzo Fieschi, the Patriarch of Antioch whom the Saracens had driven from the see, was transferred to the archiepiscopal See of Genoa by Nicholas IV in 1288…

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South American missionary of the Order of Friars Minor; born at Montilla, in the Diocese of Cordova, Spain, 10 March, 1549; died at Lima, Peru, 14 July, 1610.

St. Francis Solanus with a native of Tucuman (Anonymous, ca. 1588) (Notice his trademark violin on the ground by his right foot)

St. Francis Solanus with a native of Tucuman and his violin on the ground by his right foot.

His parents, Matthew Sanchez Solanus and Anna Ximenes, were distinguished no less for their noble birth than for their virtue and piety. When Francis was twenty years old, he was received into the Franciscan Order at Montilla, and after his ordination, several years later, he was sent by his superiors to the convent of Arifazza as master of novices. In 1589 he sailed from Spain to the New World, and having landed at Panama, crossed the isthmus and embarked on a vessel that was to convey him to Peru. His missionary labours in South America extended over a period of twenty years, during which time he spared no fatigue, shrank from no sacrifice however great, and feared no danger that stood in the way of evangelizing the vast and savage regions of Tucuman and Paraguay.  So successful, indeed, was his apostolate that he has been aptly styled the Thaumaturgus of the New World. Notwithstanding the number and difficulty of the dialects spoken by the Indians, he learned them all in a very short time, and it is said that he often addressed tribes of different tongues in one language and was understood by them all. Besides being engaged in active missionary work, he filled the office of custos of the convents of his order in Tucuman and Paraguay, and later was elected guardian of the Franciscan convent in Lima, Peru. In 1610, while preaching at Truxillo he foretold the calamities that were to befall that city, which was destroyed by an earthquake eight years later, most of the inhabitants perishing in the ruins. The death of St. Francis, which he himself had foretold, was the cause of general grief throughout Peru. In his funeral sermon at the burial of the saint, Father Sebastiani, S.J., said that “Divine Providence had chosen Father Francis Solanus to be the hope and edification of all Peru, the example and glory of Lima and the splendour of the Seraphic Order”. St. Francis was beatified by Clement X, in 1675, and canonized by Benedict XIII, in 1726. His feast is kept throughout the Franciscan Order on the twenty-fourth of July.

“Life of St. Francis Solanus” (New York, 1888); LEO, “Lives of the Saints and Blessed of the Three Orders of St. Francis” (Taunton, 1886), II 509-522; Acta SS., July, V, 847-901.

STEPHEN M. DONOVAN (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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St. Vincent Madelgarius

Photo of the bust of St. Vincent Madelgarius by Napoleon Vier.

Photo of the bust of St. Vincent Madelgarius by Napoleon Vier.

(MALDEGARIUS).

Founder and abbot of the monasteries of Hautmont and Soignies, born of a noble family at Strepy les Binche, Hainault, early in the seventh century; died at Soignies, 14 July, 677.

That he was not of Irish descent, as stated by Jean du Pont and some Irish writers, has been proved by Mabillon and the Bollandists. About 635 he married the noble Waldetrude, also venerated as a saint, and by her had two sons and two daughters, all of whom are honoured as saints. Their names were: Landric, Bishop of Meaux; Dentelin, who died as a boy of seven years; Aldetrude and Madelberte, both of whom became abbesses of Maubeuge. It is probable that Vincent visited Ireland on a mission of King Dagobert I, who esteemed him very highly, though there is no historical basis for the statement made in his anonymous life, written about the eleventh century, that King Dagobert made him ruler over Ireland. He is said to have brought with him from Ireland a number of missionaries, chief among whom were Sts. Fursy, Foillan, Ultan, Eloquius, Adalgisus, and Etto. About 642 he founded the monastery of Hautmont, near Maubeuge, where he himself became a monk about 643, being invested with the religious garb by Bishop St. Aubert of Cambrai, while his wife took the veil and lived in a cell which later became the monastery of Mons. His holy life and his fame as a spiritual guide attracted to the monastery many of his former friends, who put themselves under his spiritual direction. In the hope of finding great seclusion he erected a new monastery at Soignies whither he withdrew with a few of his monks about 670.

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LAILEU, Vie de St. Vincent Madelgaire et de Ste Waudrau, son epouse, princes et patrons du Hainaut (Tournai, 1886); Acta SS., III, July, 628-659; Mabillon, Acta SS. Bened., II, 643-5; Analecta Bollandiana, XII (Brussels, 1893), 422-440; O’HANLON, Lives of the Irish Saints, VII (Dublin, s.d.), 227-234; DU PONT, Memoriale immortale de vita et virtutibus S. Vincentii (Mons, 1649).

MICHAEL OTT (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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July 14 – The Lily of the Mohawks

July 12, 2018

Saint Kateri Tekakwitha, Lily of the Mohawks Kateri Tekakwitha was daughter of Kenneronkwa, a Mohawk chief, and Tagaskouita, a devout Roman Catholic Algonquian woman. She was born in the Mohawk fortress of Ossernenon near present-day Auriesville, New York, in 1656. Kateri’s mother was baptized and educated by French missionaries in Trois-Rivières, like many of Abenaki […]

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July 15 – Saint Pompilio Maria Pirrotti

July 12, 2018

Saint Pompilio Maria Pirrotti (29 September 1710 – 15 July 1766), born Domenico Michele Giovan Battista, was born on 29 September 1710 as the sixth of eleven children to the nobleman Girolamo Pirrotti and Orsola Bozzuti – his father was a Doctor of Law. One brother was named Pompilio Maria Pirrotti. He was baptized the […]

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July 15 – After conversion, he ordered the statues of the pagan gods chopped up and burned

July 12, 2018

St. Vladimir the Great Grand Duke of Kiev (Kieff) and All Russia, grandson of St. Olga, and the first Russian ruler to embrace Christianity, b. 956; d. at Berestova, 15 July, 1015. St. Olga could not convert her son and successor, Sviatoslav, for he lived and died a pagan and brought up his son Vladimir […]

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July 16 – Of the noble family of Odrowatz

July 12, 2018

St. Ceslaus Born at Kamien in Silesia, Poland (now Prussia), about 1184; died at Breslau about 1242. He was of the noble family of Odrowatz and a relative, probably a brother, of St. Hyacinth. Having studied philosophy at Prague, he pursued his theological and juridical studies at the University of Bologna, after which he returned […]

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July 16 – Catholic Spain’s fate in the balance at the battle of Las Navas de Tolosa

July 12, 2018

The following year was a memorable one for all Spain. King Alfonso of Castile, in face of the Almohade danger, had launched an alert to Christendom; answering it, the Christian princes had assembled not only from Spain but also from other countries. Pope Innocent III proclaimed a Crusade against the Moors of Spain and bestowed […]

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July 16 – Alfonso VIII of Castile crushes the Moors at Las Navas de Tolosa

July 12, 2018

The Almohads, the new dynasty of Moroccan fanatics who had subdued all the Moslems in al Andalus, launched an all-out attack on the Christians by moving a huge army north into south central Spain. The impetuous Alfonso VIII of Castile, without waiting for reinforcements, attempted to bar the way at Alarcos. On July 18, 1195, […]

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July 10 – Charlemagne Was Punished for His Rudeness to Her

July 9, 2018

St. Amalberga A virgin, very much revered in Belgium, who is said to have been sought in marriage by Charles, afterwards Charlemagne. Continually repulsed, Charles finally attempted to carry her off by force, but though he broke her arm in the struggle he was unable to move her from the altar before which she had […]

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July 10 – Seven Holy Noble Brethren

July 9, 2018

Saints, martyred in Rome, in 150. According to legend, they were the sons of Saint Felicitas, and suffered martyrdom under Emperor Antoninus. Januarius, Felix, and Philip were scourged to death; Silvanus was thrown over a precipice; Alexander, Vitalis, and Martialis were beheaded. Feast, Roman Calendar, 10 July… Read more here.

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July 11 – The noble saint who fled the world, but the world ran after him

July 9, 2018

Saint Benedict of Nursia Founder of western monasticism, born at Nursia, c. 480; died at Monte Cassino, 543. The only authentic life of Benedict of Nursia is that contained in the second book of Saint Gregory’s “Dialogues”. It is rather a character sketch than a biography and consists, for the most part, of a number […]

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July 12 – St. John Gualbert and the Vallumbrosan Order

July 9, 2018

The name is derived from the motherhouse, Vallombrosa (Latin Vallis umbrosa, shady valley), situated 20 miles from Florence on the northwest slope of Monte Secchieta in the Pratomagno chain, 3140 feet above the sea. I. THE FOUNDER St. John Gualbert, son of the noble Florentine Gualbert Visdomini, was born in 985 (or 995), and died […]

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July 12 – Thomas Tunstall

July 9, 2018

Ven. Thomas Tunstall Martyred at Norwich, 13 July, 1616. He was descended from the Tunstalls of Thurland, an ancient Lancashire family who afterwards settled in Yorkshire. In the Douay Diaries he is called by the alias of Helmes and is described as Carleolensis, that is, born within the ancient Diocese of Carlisle. He took the […]

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July 12 – Aristocrat Missionary to the United States of America

July 9, 2018

Comte de Charles-Auguste-Marie-Joseph Forbin-Janson A Bishop of Nancy and Toul, founder of the Association of the Holy Childhood, born in Paris, France, 3 Nov., 1785; died near Marseilles, 12 July, 1844. He was the second son of Count Michel Palamède de Forbin-Janson and of his wife Cornélie Henriette, princess of Galéan. He was a Knight […]

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July 12 – Irish-American Aristocrat Physician

July 9, 2018

William James MacNeven Distinguished Irish-American physician and medical educator, b. at Ballynahowna, near Aughrim, Co. Galway, Ireland, 21 March, 1763; d. at New York, 12 July, 1841. His ancestors were driven by Cromwell from the North of Ireland where they held large possessions to the wilds of Connaught. William James MacNeven was the eldest of […]

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Don John Unmasks the Prince of Orange

July 5, 2018

There was so much brave daring in D. John’s act of entering alone a country, for the most part rebel and not a little heretical, his Spanish troops already dismissed, and without other guards than the Duke of Arschot’s Flemings, that the Prince of Orange and his followers were amazed and understood that nothing would […]

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Eliminate Inequalities By Obscuring The Idea Of Being

July 5, 2018

 By Prof. Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira The devil would like to present man with a cultural vision of the universe that would destroy the very concept of being. However, absolutely speaking, he cannot destroy being. For example, it is not in his power to make the material in this table to stop existing. He can […]

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July 6 – Nobility dedicated to the eradication of slavery

July 5, 2018

Blessed Maria Teresia Ledóchowska (29 April 1863 – 6 July 1922) was a Roman Catholic nun and African missionary. She was the eldest of seven children. Members of the Polish nobility, she and her siblings – including Wlodimir Ledóchowski, Ursula Ledóchowska and Ignacy Kazimierz Ledóchowski were born on the estate of their father, Count Antoni […]

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July 6 – Mother-in-law Woes

July 5, 2018

St. Godelina Born at Hondeforte-lez-Boulogne, c. 1049; died at Ghistelles, 6 July, 1070. The youngest of the three children born to Hemfrid, seigneur of Wierre-Effroy, and his wife Ogina, Godelina was accustomed as a child to exercises of piety and was soon distinguished for a solidity of virtue extraordinary for one of her years. The […]

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July 6 – The King Had Three Daughters, All Saints

July 5, 2018

St. Sexburga of Ely Died about 699. Her sisters, Sts. Ethelburga and Saethrid, were both Abbesses of Faremontier in Brie, St. Withburga was a nun at Ely, and St. Etheldreda became Abbess of Ely. Sexburga was the daughter of Anna, King of the East Angles, and was married about 640 to Earconbert, King of Kent. […]

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July 6 – Bl. Thomas Alfield

July 5, 2018

Bl. Thomas Alfield (AUFIELD, ALPHILDE, HAWFIELD, OFFELDUS; alias BADGER). Priest, born at Gloucestershire; martyred at Tyburn, 6 July, 1585. He was educated at Eton and Cambridge (1568). He was afterwards converted and came to Douai College in 1576, but the troubles there compelled him to intermit his studies for four years, and he was eventually […]

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July 7 – The Princess who left court and entered a forest monastery

July 5, 2018

St. Edelburga, Virgin, also called St. Æthelburh of Faremoutiers. She was daughter to Anna king of the East Angles, and out of a desire of attaining to Christian perfection, went into France, and there consecrated herself to God in the monastery of Faremoutier, in the forest of Brie, in the government of which she succeeded […]

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July 7 – Only two cardinals dared to stand with the pope

July 5, 2018

Blessed Pope Benedict XI (Nicholas Boccasini) Born at Treviso, Italy, 1240; died at Perugia, 7 July, 1304. He entered the Dominican Order at the age of fourteen. After fourteen years of study, he became lector of theology, which office he filled for several years. In 1296 he was elected Master General of the Order. As […]

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July 7 – Prince Abbots

July 5, 2018

Sts. Willibald and Winnebald (WUNIBALD, WYNNEBALD). Members of the Order of St. Benedict, brothers, natives probably of Wessex in England, the former, first Bishop of Eichstätt, born on 21 October, 700 (701); died on 7 July, 781 (787); the latter, Abbot of Heidenheim, born in 702; died on 18 (19) December, 761. They were the […]

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July 8 – The Pope who fought the democrats

July 5, 2018

Pope Blessed Eugene III Bernardo Pignatelli, born in the neighbourhood of Pisa, elected 15 Feb., 1145; died at Tivoli, 8 July, 1153. On the very day that Pope Lucius II succumbed, either to illness or wounds, the Sacred College, foreseeing that the Roman populace would make a determined effort to force the new pontiff to […]

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July 8 – Vasco da Gama Prays To Our Lady Before Setting Out For India

July 5, 2018

At Belém they were all kneeling at his side: Paulo da Gama, his brother, with Nicolau Coelho and Gonçalo Nunes, his other captains and their pilots, Pero de Alenquer, João de Coimbra, Pero Escolar, Afonso Gonçalves; and likewise the “secretaries” Diogo Dias, João de Sá and Álvaro de Braga. Bartolomeu Dias was also there, for […]

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July 9 – St. Veronica Giuliani

July 5, 2018

St. Veronica Giuliani Born at Mercatello in the Duchy of Urbino, Italy, 1660; died at Città di Castello, 9 July, 1727. Her parents, Francesco Giuliana and Benedetta Mancini, were both of gentle birth. In baptism she was named Ursula, and showed marvelous signs of sanctity. When but eighteen months old she uttered her first words […]

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July 9 – At the center of the controversy, when the Pope deposed King John of England

July 5, 2018

Stephen Langton Cardinal and Archbishop of Canterbury, b. in the latter half of the twelfth century; d. at Slindon Manor, Sussex, July 9, 1228. Although the roll of English churchmen has few names more illustrious, Langton’s fame is hardly equal to his achievements. Even among his own countrymen too few have an adequate knowledge of […]

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July 3 – The Pope Who Condemned His Predecessor for Not Opposing Heresy

July 2, 2018

Pope St. Leo II Pope (682-83), date of birth unknown; d. 28 June, 683. He was a Sicilian, and son of one Paul. Though elected pope a few days after the death of St. Agatho (10 June, 681), he was not consecrated till after the lapse of a year and seven months (17 Aug., 682). […]

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July 3 – The Twin

July 2, 2018

St. Thomas the Apostle Little is recorded of St. Thomas the Apostle, nevertheless thanks to the fourth Gospel his personality is clearer to us than that of some others of the Twelve. His name occurs in all the lists of the Synoptists (Matthew 10:3; Mark 3:18; Luke 6, cf. Acts 1:13), but in St. John […]

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July 4 – Unsung American Hero

July 2, 2018

St. Anthony Daniel Huron missionary, born at Dieppe, in Normandy, 27 May 1601, slain by the Iroquois at Teanaostae, near Hillsdale, Simcoe County, Ontario, Canada, 4 July, 1648. After two years’ study of philosophy and one of law, he entered the Society of Jesus in Rome, 1 October, 1621. Sent to Canada in 1633 he […]

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July 4 – St. Bertha of Blangy

July 2, 2018

St. Bertha (Abbess of Blangy in Artois) Died about 725. She was the daughter of Rigobert, Count of the Palace under Clovis II, and married Siegfried, a relation of the king. After twenty years, when he died, she determined to found a nunnery. Two buildings which she constructed fell down, but an angel in a […]

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July 4 – Patroness of victims of adultery, jealousy and unfaithfulness

July 2, 2018

St. Elizabeth, Queen of Portugal A.D. 1336. ST. ELIZABETH was daughter of Peter III,  king of Aragon, and granddaughter of James I, who had been educated under the care of St. Peter Nolasco, and was surnamed the Saint, and from the taking of Majorca and Valentia, Expugnator or the Conqueror. Her mother, Constantia, was daughter […]

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July 5 – St. Michael de Sanctis

July 2, 2018

St. Michael de Sanctis (DE LOS SANTOS). Born at, Vich in Catalonia, 29 September, 1591; died at Valladolid, 10 April, 1625. At the age of twelve years he came to Barcelona, and asked to be received into the monastery of the Trinitarians, in which order, after a three years’ novitiate, he took vows in the […]

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July 5 – He founded the Barnebites and reformed two religious orders, but only lived 37 years

July 2, 2018

St. Antonio Maria Zaccaria Founder of the Clerks Regular of St. Paul, commonly known as the Barnabites; born in Cremona, Italy, 1502; died 5 July, 1539. While he was still an infant his father died, leaving the care of the child’s education to his mother, who taught him compassion for the poor and suffering by […]

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Paris At The Beginning of 1792

June 28, 2018

Paris in 1792 is no longer what it was in 1789. In 1789, the old French society was still brilliant. The past endured beside the present. Neither names nor escutcheons, neither liveries nor places at court, had been suppressed. The aristocracy and the Revolution lived face to face. In 1792, the scene has changed. The […]

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Eliminate Beauty by Destroying Inequalities

June 28, 2018

By Prof. Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira   One of the things the devil strives to do to influence souls is to present a vision of the universe in which variety and inequality, the most striking sensible elements that God placed in the universe to reflect His image, go unperceived. God imprinted His image upon the […]

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June 30 – He began a crusade against the immorality of his time

June 28, 2018

Blessed Januarius Maria Sarnelli One of S. Alphonsus’s earliest companions, fourth son of Baron Angelo Sarnelli of Ciorani, born in Naples 12 Sept., 1702; died 30 June, 1744. From his childhood he was remarkable for modesty, self-denial, piety, and great diligence in his studies. At the age of fourteen he desired to become a Jesuit, […]

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June 30 – How a Humble Servant Transformed the New York Upper Class

June 28, 2018

Servant of God Pierre Toussaint (1766-1853) Born to slavery in Saint Domingue (present-day Haiti), Toussaint came to New York in 1789 with his master, Jean Bérard du Pithon, a French noble and prosperous planter who was fleeing the turmoil unleashed in Saint Domingue by the French Revolution. Two years later, his master died without having […]

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July 1 – The Marquis of Lescure destroys two thirds of Westermann’s army and saves the lives of captured enemy soldiers

June 28, 2018

While the grand army were under the walls of Nantes, several engagements had taken place in La Vendée. Westermann, at the head of a German legion, advanced into the heart of the Bocage, after making himself master of Parthenay, on the 20th June. On the 1st July he burned the town of Amaillon; he then […]

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July 1 – Condemned to death for promoting the Catholic faith, he responded “Deo gratias”

June 28, 2018

Saint Oliver Plunket Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of all Ireland, born at Loughcrew near Oldcastle, County Meath, Ireland, 1629; died 11 July, 1681. His is the brightest name in the Irish Church throughout the whole period of persecution. He was connected by birth with the families which had just then been ennobled, the Earls […]

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July 1 – Venerable Thomas Maxfield

June 28, 2018

Ven. Thomas Maxfield (Vere Macclesfield) English priest and martyr, born in Stafford gaol, about 1590, martyred at Tyburn, London, Monday, 1 July, 1616. He was one of the younger sons of William Macclesfield of Chesterton and Maer and Aston, Staffordshire (a firm recusant, condemned to death in 1587 for harbouring priests, one of whom was […]

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