According to The Crown Chronicles:

A new set of bollards have been placed outside of Buckingham Palace overnight, in response to the recent Westminster attack.

The yellow structures will prevent any vehicles mounting the pavement area – as happened in the attack on Wednesday – but will slow the flow of foot traffic at the tourist hotspot.

Security in the capital has been improved – London forces are thought to be operating at near double strength – and in other large cities, more police patrols have been noticed. Armoured bomb-proof vehicles have been spotted outside the Palace of Westminster; they can reportedly withstand an onslaught…

To read the entire article in The Crown Chronicles, please click here.

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According to the Royal Forums:

A telephone poll conducted earlier in March by the All-Russian Center for the Study of Public Opinion has shown that 68% of those surveyed do not want to restore the monarchy in Russia.

When the respondents were asked what style of government was “most suitable for the Russian state” – republican or monarchy – an overwhelming 82% answered republican. Support for a monarchy was highest in the 45-59 year old age group (31%), and came from more respondents located in Moscow and St Petersburg (19%) than regional areas.

1,600 respondents were surveyed.

To read the entire article in the Royal Forums, please click here.

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St. Isaac’s Cathedral

The time to arrive was about 11:30 p.m., when the great church, packed to its doors by a vast throng, was wrapped in almost total darkness…. As the eyes grew accustomed to the shadows, tens of thousands of unlighted candles, outlining the arches, cornices, and other architectural features of the cathedral, were just visible. These candles each had their wick touched with kerosene and then surrounded with a thread of gun-cotton, which ran continuously from candle to candle right round the building. When the hanging end of the thread of gun-cotton was lighted, the flame ran swiftly round the church, kindling each candle in turn; a very fascinating sight.… When, as the first stroke of midnight pealed form the great clock, the Metropolitan of Petrograd announced in a loud voice, “Christ is risen!”

At an electric signal given from the cathedral, the great guns of the fortress boomed out in a salute of one hundred and one guns; the gun-cotton was touched off, and the swift flash kindles the tens of thousands of candles running round the building; the enormous congregation lit the tapers they carried; the “royal doors” of the iconostas were thrown open, and the clergy appeared in the festival vestments of cloth of gold, as their choir burst in the beautiful Russian Easter anthem, and so the Easter Mass began. Nothing more poignantly dramatic, more magnificently impressive, could possibly be imagined than this almost instantaneous change from intense gloom to blazing light…I never tired of witnessing this splendid piece of symbolism.

The vanished pomps of yesterday; being some random reminiscences of a British diplomat by Hamilton, Frederick Spencer, Lord, 1856-1928 P. 106-107.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 570

 

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Somehow, when summoning the Zouaves of the world to defend the Papal States, Pius IX by no means preached a crusade. Of course the doctrine was on his mind, but there was a kind of shame and fear of pushing that spirit forward because of the excess which, through a kind of psychological continuity – which expressing myself poorly I would call atavistic – remained in people.

And since that strong reaction against excess had remained in people and they no longer heard anything about the other side [of the matter], the thing waned in the direction we talked about.

 

(Excerpt from an MNF, Thursday, Sept. 14, 1989 – Nobility.org translation)

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Saint Eulogius of Alexandria

St. Eulogius of Alexandria

St. Eulogius of Alexandria

Patriarch of that See from 580 to 607. He was a successful combatant of the heretical errors then current in Egypt, notably the various phases of Monophysitism. He was a warm friend of St. Gregory the Great, corresponded with him, and received from that pope many flattering expressions of esteem and admiration. Among other merits the pope makes special mention of his defense of the primacy of the Roman See (Baronius, Ann. Eccl., ad an. 597, no. 9) Eulogius refuted the Novatians, some communities of which ancient sect still existed in his diocese, and vindicated the hypostatic union of the two natures in Christ, against both Nestorius and Eutyches. Baronius (ad ann. 600, no. 5) says that Gregory wished Eulogius to survive him, recognizing in him the voice of truth. It has been rightly said that he restored for a brief period to the church of Alexandria that life and youthful vigor characteristic of those churches only which remain closely united to Rome. Besides the above works and a commentary against the various sects of the Monophysites (Severians, Theodosians, Cainites, Acephali) he left eleven discourses in defense of Leo I and the council of Chalcedon, also a work against the Agnoeti, submitted by him before publication to Gregory I, who after some observations authorized it unchanged. With exception of one sermon and a few fragments all the writings of Eulogius have perished.
M. J. MCNEAL (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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March 31 – St. Balbina

March 30, 2017

St. Balbina

Santa Balbina Basilica in Rome

Santa Balbina Basilica in Rome

Memorials of a St. Balbina are to be found at Rome in three different spots which are connected with the early Christian antiquities of that city. In the purely legendary account of the martyrdom of St. Alexander (acta SS., Maii, I, 367 sqq.) mention is made of a tribune Quirinus who died a martyr and was buried in the catacomb of Praetextatus on the Via Appia. His grace was regarded with great veneration and is referred to in the old itineraries (guides for pilgrims) of the Roman catacombs. Tradition said that his daughter Balbina, who had been baptized by St. Alexander who had passed her life unmarried, was buried after death near her father in the same catacomb. Subscription7 The feast of St. Balbina is celebrated 31 March. Usuardus speaks of her in his martyrology; his account of St. Balbina rests on the record of the martyrdom of St. Alexander. There is another Balbina whose name was given to a catacomb (coem. Balbinae) which lay between the Via Appia and the Via Ardeatina not far from the little church called Domine quo vadis. Over this cemetery a basilica was erected in the fourth century by Pope Mark. There still exists on the little Aventine in the city itself the old title of St. Balbina, first mentioned in an epitaph of the sixth century and in the signatures to a Roman council (595) of the time of Pope Gregory I. This church was erected in a large ancient hall. Its titular saint is supposed to be identical with the St. Balbina who was buried in the catacomb of Praetextatus and whose bones together with those of her father were brought here at a later date. It is not certain, however, that the two names refer to the same person.

J.P. KIRSCH (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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St. Nuno De Santa Maria Álvares Pereira

(1360-1431)

Count St. Nuno Álvares Pereira, Constable of Portugal

Count St. Nuno Álvares Pereira, Constable of Portugal

NUNO ÁLVARES PEREIRA was born in Portugal on 24th June 1360, most probably at Cernache do Bomjardin, illegitimate son of Brother Álvaro Gonçalves Pereira, Hospitalier Knight of St. John of Jerusalem and prior of Crato and Donna Iria Gonçalves do Carvalhal. About a year after his birth, the child was legitimized by royal decree and so was able to receive a knightly education typical of the offspring of the noble families of the time. At thirteen years of age he became page to Queen Leonor, was received at court and was created a knight. At sixteen years of age, at the wish of his father, he married a rich young widow Donna Leonor de Alvim. Three children were born to the union, two boys who died early in life, and a girl, Beatrice, who would eventually marry Afonso, first Duke of Bragança, son of King João I…

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Bishop and Confessor

The first tincture of the mind is of the utmost importance to virtue; and it was the happiness of this saint to receive from his cradle the strongest impressions of piety by the example and care of his illustrious and holy parents. He was born at Chateau-neuf, in the territory of Valence in Dauphiné, in 1053. His father, Odilo, served his country in an honourable post in the army, in which he acquitted himself of his duty to his prince with so much the greater fidelity and valour, as he most ardently endeavoured to sanctify his profession and all his actions by a motive of religion. Being sensible that all authority which…

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(Also known as Carlo d’Austria, Charles of Austria)

Charles I, Emperor of Austria (1916-1918).

Born August 17, 1887, in the Castle of Persenbeug in the region of Lower Austria, his parents were the Archduke Otto and Princess Maria Josephine of Saxony, daughter of the last King of Saxony. Emperor Francis Joseph I was Charles’ Great Uncle…

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The Bartlett pear is called “The Good Christian” in France, after St. Francis of Paola introduced it

“Said to have originated in Calabria in southern Italy, Bartletts probably were introduced to France by St. Francis of Paola. St. Francis brought a young tree as a gift for King Louis XI of France, who had summoned him in the hope that the saint would miraculously cure the king’s many illnesses. When the king died in 1483, St. Francis returned to Italy, but he left behind the legacy of his pear tree, called by the French the ‘poire bon chretien’ (good Christian pear).”

Nick Malgieri is the author of “Perfect Cakes” and “A Baker’s Tour” (HarperCollins) and “Perfect Light Desserts” (Morro…

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St. Richard of Wyche

St. Richard of WycheBishop and confessor, born about 1197 at Droitwich, Worcestershire, from which his surname is derived; died 3 April, 1253, at Dover.

He was the second son of Richard and Alice de Wyche. His father died while he was still young and the family property fell into a state of great delapidation. His elder brother offered to resign the inheritance to him, but Richard refused the offer, although he undertook the management of the estate and soon restored it to a good condition. He went to Oxford, where he and two companions lived in such poverty that they had only one tunic and hooded gown between them, in which they attended lectures by turns. He then went to Paris and on his return proceeded Master of Arts. At Bologna he studied canon law…

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Josef Speckbacher

A Tyrolean patriot of 1809, born at Gnadenwald, near Hall, in the Tyrol, 13 July, 1767; died at Hall, 28 March, 1820. Speckbacher was the son of a peasant and spent his youth in roaming, and he did not learn to read and write until later in life. At the age of twelve he was a poacher and was often involved in fights with the customs officers. When a little older, he worked in the imperial salt-mines at Hall. On 10 Feb., 1794, he married Maria Schmiederer of Judenstein, and in this way came into possession of her farm and house. At the beginning of the war with France he became one of the volunteers who sought to defend the fatherland; his first encounter with the enemy took place at the bloody skirmish near Spinges on 2 April, 1797. He was a fine sharp-shooter…

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St. Gontran, King and Confessor

Statue of St. Guntram

Statue of St. Guntram

He was son of King Clotaire, and grandson of Clovis I and St. Clotilda. Being the second son, whilst his brothers Charibert reigned at Paris, and Sigebert in Austrasia, residing at Metz, he was crowned King of Orleans and Burgundy in 661, making Challons on the Saone his capital. When compelled to take up arms against his ambitious brothers and the Lombards, he made no other use of his victories, under the conduct of a brave general called Mommol, than to give peace to his dominions. He protected his nephews against the practices of the wicked dowager queen, Brunehault of Sigebert, and Fredegonde of Chilperic, the firebrands of France. The putting to death of the physicians of the queen at her request, on her death-bed, and the divorcing of his wife Mercatrude…

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The capture and death of the fearless Charette

On the 21st February his troop, now reduced to less than two hundred men, was attacked by General Travot, one of the ablest officers of Hoche. The Vendeans behaved with the greatest courage, but they were overwhelmed with numbers. The eldest brother of the general, Charette la Colinière, and several officers fell; and he himself escaped with difficulty, followed by only fourteen men. The next day all the surviving chiefs of the insurgent army gave in their submission, and nothing remained but to capture Charette himself. The republican generals, well informed by their spies, were in hot pursuit; and yet he contrived to carry on the campaign for a whole month longer…

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St. Eustace

Date of birth unknown, died March 29, 625.

He was second abbot of the Irish monastery of Luxeuil in France, and his feast is commemorated in the Celtic martyrologies on the 29th of March.

He was one of the first companions of St. Columbanus, a monk of Bangor (Ireland), who with his disciples did much to spread the Gospel over Central and Southern Europe. When Columbanus, the founder of Luxeuil, was banished from the Kingdom of Burgundy, on account of his reproving the morals of King Thierry, the exiled abbot recommended his community to…

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St. John Climacus

Also surnamed SCHOLASTICUS, and THE SINAITA, born doubtlessly in Syria, about 525; died on Mount Sinai. 30 March, probably in 606, according the credited opinion — others say 605.

Although his education and learning fitted him to live in an intellectual environment, he chose, while still young, to abandon the world for a life of solitude. The region of Mount Sanai was then celebrated for the holiness of the monks who inhabited it; he betook himself thither and trained himself to the practice of the Christian virtues under the direction of a monk named Martyrius. After the death of Martyrius John, wishing to practise greater…

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By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

Confrontation of knights in the countryside by Eugène Delacroix

In that period called feudal anarchy, in which the feudal lords, with a hypertrophied notion of their own rights, overweening pride and zero notion of organic society launched forth against the kings, the issue became so pressing as to require emphasizing the role of the king and taking the notion of this role as far as the Catholic Church would permit.

Well, then, as a punishment for mankind, or for whatever reason, that caused a reaction.

The Capitulation of Granada, Painting by Francisco Pradilla y Ortiz. Boabdil gives the keys of the city to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella

Take, for example, the combative spirit (by the way, Cervantes caught a bit of this: in some ways his Don Quixote was an exaggeration of those virtues that later wilted and died). The combative spirit led those people to invent wars against one another very easily and for any or no reason, in most cases with a defined and determined intention of personal gain.

So those were not wars waged for a region, or for a cause, but because a big boss wanted to grow in importance. He was not content with his situation. He wanted to climb to a place he did not belong, and thus he created an unbearable situation for everyone trying to put that society in order.

 

(Excerpt from an MNF, Thursday, Sept. 14, 1989 – Nobility.org translation)

 

 

 

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Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord, Prince de Benevente. Painting by François Gérard.

Talleyrand was the only person who had authority over Napoleon and the only one whom Napoleon never intimidated. He took the liberty of displaying a respectful impertinence which would not have been tolerated in the case of any other person…. “Talleyrand, where have you made so much money?” asked Napoleon.—“Sire, I bought Government Stock on the 17th of Brumaire and sold it on the 19th.” That was a familiarity dating back to the beginning of the Consulate. On the day when the First Consul was waiting feverishly for news of the signing of the Treaty of Amiens, Talleyrand called upon him with the signed treaty in his pocket, and, without saying anything about it, entered into a lengthy conversation on secondary matters. Just as he was taking leave of him, Talleyrand remarked: “By the by, I am going to give you a great pleasure. The treaty has been signed—and here it is!”—“Well!” exclaimed Bonaparte, “why didn’t you tell me so immediately”—“Ah! Because you wouldn’t have listened to what I had to say about all the other things. When you are happy, there’s no getting near you.” Often he kept back important documents until Napoleon was in a frame of mind which would make him receptive of his advice.

Catherine Worlée, Princess of Talleyrand-Périgord

In the case of such an impulsive man as he was, it was urgent to wait. Napoleon forced him to marry an adventuress whom he “attached to his neck like a sign-board,” thus discrediting him, so as to break him in and enslave him. Having, on the day following the legal confirmation of the union, convoked him, Napoleon said: “I hope that Citoyenne Talleyrand will forget Mme Grant and be an honor to you.” The new husband replied: “Citoyenne Talleyrand has only to take Citoyenne Bonaparte as a model.”

Comte de Saint-Aulaire, Talleyrand, trans. Geroge Frederic Lees and Frederick J. Stephens (New York: The MacMillan Company, 1937), 181-2.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 569

 

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St. Catherine of Sweden

Patroness against abortion and miscarriage.

St. Catherine of Sweden. Photo by Smas.

St. Catherine of Sweden. Photo by Smas.

The fourth child of Saint Bridget and her husband, Ulf Gudmarsson, born 1331 or 1332; died 24 March, 1381. At the time of her death Saint Catherine was head of the convent of Wadstena, founded by her mother; hence the name, Catherine Vastanensis, by which she is occasionally called. At the age of seven she was sent to the abbess of the convent of Riseberg to be educated and soon showed, like her mother, a desire for a life of self-mortification and devotion to spiritual things. At the command of her father, when about thirteen or fourteen years, she married a noble of German descent, Eggart von Kürnen. She at once persuaded her husband, who was a very religious man, to join her in a vow of chastity. Both lived in a state of virginity and devoted themselves to the exercise of Christian perfection and active charity. In spite of her deep love for her husband, Catherine accompanied her mother to Rome, where Saint Bridget went in 1349. Soon after her arrival in that city Catherine received news of the death of her husband in Sweden. She now lived constantly with her mother, took an active part in Saint Bridget’s fruitful labours, and zealously imitated her mother’s ascetic life. Although the distinguished and beautiful young widow was surrounded by suitors, she steadily refused all offers of marriage. In 1372 Saint Catherine and her brother, Birger, accompanied their mother on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land; after their return to Rome Saint Catherine was with her mother in the latter’s last illness and death.

In 1374, in obedience to Saint Bridget’s wish, Catherine brought back her mother’s body to Sweden for burial at Wadstena, of which foundation she now became the head. It was the motherhouse of the Brigittine Order, also called the Order of Saint Saviour. Catherine managed the convent with great skill and made the life there one in harmony with the principles laid down by its founder. The following year she went again to Rome in order to promote the canonization of Saint Bridget, and to obtain a new papal confirmation of the order. She secured another confirmation both from Gregory XI (1377) and from Urban VI (1379) but was unable to gain time in the canonization of her mother, as the confusion caused by the Schism delayed the process. When this sorrowful division appeared she showed herself, like Saint Catherine of Siena, a steadfast adherent of the part of the Roman Pope, Urban VI, in whose favor she testified before a judicial commission. Catherine stayed five years in Italy and then returned home, bearing a special letter of commendation from the pope. Not long after her arrival in Sweden she was taken ill and died. In 1484 Innocent VIII gave permission for her veneration as a saint and her feast was assigned to 22 March in the Roman Martyrology. Catherine wrote a devotional work entitled “Consolation of the Soul” (Sielinna Troëst), largely composed of citations from the Scriptures and from early religious books; no copy is known to exist. Generally she is represented with a hind at her side, which is said to have come to her aid when unchaste youths sought to ensnare her.

J. P. Kirsch (Catholic Encyclopedia)Subscription7

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St. Lucy Filippini

(13 January 1672 – 25 March 1732)

St. Lucy FilippiniShe was orphaned at an early age when her parents both died. From there she went to live with her aristocratic aunt and uncle who encouraged her religious inclination by entrusting her education to the Benedictine nuns at Santa Lucia.

Her career began under the patronage of Cardinal Gregorio Barbarigo, who entrusted her with the work of founding schools for young women, especially the poor. With Rose Venerini to train school teachers, she co-founded the Pious Matrons, a group dedicated to the education of girls. The curriculum included domestic arts, weaving, embroidering, reading, and Christian doctrine. The success of her schools — fifty-two in total — caught the attention of Pope Clement XI, who called her to work in Rome. She died of breast cancer in 1732.

Her statue can be seen in the south nave of St. Peter’s Basilica.

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The Annunciation – “Of His Kingdom, there shall be no end.”

March 23, 2017

The Annunciation, by Father Thomas de Saint-Laurent Out of love for us, the Eternal Word was made flesh in the chaste womb of Mary. His plan was marvelously arranged. From all eternity, He chose a man after His heart who would be the virginal spouse of His divine Mother, His adopted father on earth, and […]

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The Annunciation: He is King by right, and also by conquest

March 23, 2017

by Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira We will comment on this passage taken from Saint Luke: “And in the sixth month, the angel Gabriel was sent from God into a city of Galilee, called Nazareth, to a virgin espoused to a man whose name was Joseph, of the house of David; and the virgin’s name was […]

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March 26 – One of the distinguished men of his age

March 23, 2017

Geoffrey of Vendôme (GOFFRIDUS ABBAS VINDOCINENSIS.) A cardinal, born in the second half of the eleventh century of a noble family, at Angers, France; died there, 26 March, 1132. At an early age he entered the Benedictine community of the Blessed Trinity at Vendôme in the diocese of Chartres; and in 1093, while still very […]

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March 26 – St. Ludger

March 23, 2017

St. Ludger (Lüdiger or Liudger) Missionary among the Frisians and Saxons, first Bishop of Munster in Westphalia, b. at Zuilen near Utrecht about 744; d. 26 March, 809. Feast, 26 March. Represented as a bishop reciting his Breviary, or with a swan at either side. His parents, Thiadgrim and Liafburg, were wealthy Frisians of noble […]

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March 26 – Sheriff’s daughter, but God’s first.

March 23, 2017

St. Margaret Clitherow Martyr, called the “Pearl of York”, born about 1556; died 25 March 1586. She was a daughter of Thomas Middleton, Sheriff of York (1564-5), a wax-chandler; married John Clitherow, a wealthy butcher and a chamberlain of the city, in St. Martin’s church, Coney St., 8 July, 1571, and lived in the Shambles, […]

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March 27 – Royal Simplicity

March 23, 2017

St. Rupert (Alternative forms, RUPRECHT, Hrodperht, Hrodpreht, Roudbertus, Rudbertus, Robert, Ruprecht). First Bishop of Salzburg, contemporary of Childebert III, king of the Franks (695-711), date of birth unknown; died at Salzburg, Easter Sunday, 27 March, 718. According to an old tradition, he was a scion of the Frankish Merovingian family. The assumption of 660 as […]

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March 21-22 – James Harrison

March 20, 2017

James Harrison Priest and martyr; born in the Diocese of Lichfield, England, date unknown; died at York, 22 March, 1602. He studied at the English College at Reims, and was ordained there in September, 1583. In the following year he went on the English mission, where he laboured unobtrusively. In the early part of 1602 […]

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March 22 – The soldier who fought with sword in one hand and rosary in the other

March 20, 2017

St. Nicholas of Flüe, patron of: -Pontifical Swiss Guards  -Switzerland -difficult marriages -large families -judges Born 21 March, 1417, on the Flüeli, a fertile plateau near Sachseln, Canton Obwalden, Switzerland; died 21 March, 1487, as a recluse in a neighboring ravine, called Ranft. He was the oldest son of pious, well-to-do peasants and from his […]

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March 22 – He Stood Up to Hitler Without Flinching

March 20, 2017

Blessed Clemens August Graf von Galen “Lion of Münster” Born     March 16, 1878 Dinklage Castle, Dinklage, Grand Duchy of Oldenburg, German Confederation Died     March 22, 1946 (aged 68) Münster, Province of Westphalia, Germany Beatified     9 October 2005 by Pope Benedict XVI Feast     22 March The Blessed Clemens August Graf von Galen […]

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March 22 – The Le Moyne: nobles of North America

March 20, 2017

Le Moyne The name of one of the most illustrious families of the New World, whose deeds adorn the pages of Canadian history. Charles Le Moyne Founder of the family, b. of Pierre Le Moyne and Judith Duchesne at Dieppe on 1 August, 1626; d. at Ville-Marie (Montreal), 1683. On reaching Canada in 1641, he […]

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March 23 – Generous Noble Missionary

March 20, 2017

St. Toribio Alfonso Mogrovejo (aka St. Alphonsus Turibius) Archbishop of Lima; b. at Mayorga, León, Spain, 1538; d. near Lima Peru, 23 March 1606. Of noble family and highly educated, he was professor of laws at the University of Salamanca, where his learning and virtue led to his appointment as Grand Inquisitor of Spain by […]

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Queen Elizabeth gives Royal Assent to Brexit

March 16, 2017

According to BBC News: The Queen has given Royal Assent to the Brexit bill, clearing the way for Theresa May to start talks to leave the European Union. The European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill was passed by MPs and peers on Monday. It allows the prime minister to notify Brussels that the UK is […]

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Medals to the Gurkhas

March 16, 2017

According to the Royal Household: The medal ceremony started with the Royal Gurkha Rifles and The Band of The Brigade of Gurkhas marching from Wellington Barracks to Buckingham Palace. The Gurkhas then assembled in The Ballroom of Buckingham Palace where they were presented with their medals by The Prince of Wales and Prince Harry. 154 […]

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King Philippe Celebrates Anniversary of Belgian Gingerbread Maker

March 16, 2017

According to the Royal Forums: Belgium’s King Philippe paid a visit to Lebbeke on Tuesday, where he stopped at the Vondelmolen NV factory. The company, which is the largest producer of gingerbread in Belgium, this year celebrates their 150th anniversary, the reason for their royal visit. King Philippe was given a tour of the factory, […]

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Purgatory in Painting

March 16, 2017

I have read in the Dictionary of Education a very amusing anecdote, which may, nevertheless, be cited of what I have said of All Souls’ Day. Certain canons over 1,000 years ago, having had to repair their Church, added to it a chapel dedicated to the Souls in Purgatory. The Sculptor who was charged with […]

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Devotion to the Holy Rosary

March 16, 2017

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira    February 12th 1964 As we all know, one great value of devotion to the Rosary is that it was revealed by Our Lady to Saint Dominic as a means for reviving the Faith in regions heavily devastated by the Albigensian heresy.  Indeed, the general practice of the Rosary revived the […]

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March 17 – The Great and Noble Patrick

March 16, 2017

St. Patrick Apostle of Ireland, born at Kilpatrick, near Dumbarton, in Scotland, in the year 387; died at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland, 17 March, 493. He had for his parents Calphurnius and Conchessa. The former belonged to a Roman family of high rank and held the office of decurio in Gaul or Britain. Conchessa was a […]

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March 17 – St. Gertrude of Nivelles

March 16, 2017

St. Gertrude of Nivelles Virgin, and Abbess of the Benedictine monastery of Nivelles; born in 626; died 17 March, 659. She was a daughter of Pepin I of Landen, and a younger sister of St. Begga, Abbess of Andenne. One day, when she was about ten years of old, her father invited King Dagobert and […]

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March 18 – Martyr King

March 16, 2017

Saint Edward the Martyr King of England, son to Edgar the Peaceful, and uncle to St. Edward the Confessor; born about 962; died March 18, 979. His accession to the throne on his father’s death, in 975, was opposed by a party headed by his stepmother, Queen Elfrida, who was bent on securing the crown […]

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March 20 – Saint Joseph, Martyr of Grandeur

March 16, 2017

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira To have an idea of what Saint Joseph—the Patron of the Church—was like, we must consider two prodigious facts: he was the foster father of the Child Jesus and he was the spouse of Our Lady. The husband must be proportional to the wife. Now who is Our Lady? She […]

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March 20 – St. Joseph

March 16, 2017

Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary and foster-father of Our Lord Jesus Christ. LIFE Sources. The chief sources of information on the life of St. Joseph are the first chapters of our first and third Gospels; they are practically also the only reliable sources, for, whilst, on the holy patriarch’s life, as on many other […]

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March 20 – Homeless Noble Poet

March 16, 2017

Blessed Baptista Mantuanus (Or SPAGNOLI). Carmelite and Renaissance poet, born at Mantua, 17 April, 1447, where he also died, 22 March, 1516. The eldest son of Peter Spagnoli, a Spanish nobleman at the court of Mantua, Baptista studied grammar under Gregorio Tifernate, and philosophy at Pavia under Polo Bagelardi. The bad example of his schoolfellows […]

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March 20 – St. Wulfram

March 16, 2017

St. Wulfram Bishop of Sens, missionary in Frisi, born at Milly near Fontainebleau, probably during the reign of Clovis II (638-56); died 20 March, before 704, in which year a translation of his body took place (Duchesne, “Fastes épiscopaux de l’ancienne Gaule”, II, Paris, 1900, 413). His father Fulbert stood high in the esteem of […]

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March 20 – Vendor of Learning

March 16, 2017

St. Clement of Ireland Also known as Clemens Scotus (not to be confounded with Claudius Clemens). Born in Ireland, towards the middle of the eighth century, died perhaps in France, probably after 818. About the year 771 he set out for France. His biographer, an Irish monk of St. Gall, who wrote his Acts, dedicated […]

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March 20 – St. Cuthbert

March 16, 2017

St. Cuthbert Bishop of Lindisfarne, patron of Durham, born about 635; died 20 March, 687. His emblem is the head of St. Oswald, king and martyr, which he is represented as bearing in his hands. His feast is kept in Great Britain and Ireland on the 20th of March, and he is patron of the […]

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March 14 – Patroness of Those Falsely Accused

March 13, 2017

St. Matilda, Queen of Saxony Queen of Germany, wife of King Henry I (The Fowler), born at the Villa of Engern in Westphalia, about 895; died at Quedlinburg, 14 March, 968. She was brought up at the monastery of Erfurt. Henry, whose marriage to a young widow, named Hathburg, had been declared invalid, asked for […]

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March 15 – Pope St. Zachary

March 13, 2017

Pope St. Zachary (ZACHARIAS.) Reigned 741-52. Year of birth unknown; died in March, 752. Zachary sprang from a Greek family living in Calabria; his father, according to the “Liber Pontificalis”, was called Polichronius. Most probably he was a deacon of the Roman Church and as such signed the decrees of the Roman council of 732. […]

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March 15 – Her nuns earned the name “Angels of the Battlefield”

March 13, 2017

St. Louise de Marillac Le Gras Foundress of the Sisters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul, born at Paris, 12 August, 1591, daughter of Louis de Marillac, Lord of Ferrieres, and Marguerite Le Camus; died there, 15 March, 1660. Her mother having died soon after the birth of Louise, the education of the latter […]

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March 16 – Chancellor to Italy and Germany

March 13, 2017

St. Heribert, Archbishop of Cologne Born at Worms, c. 970; died at Cologne, 16 March, 1021. His father was Duke Hugo of Worms. After receiving his education at the cathedral school of Worms, he spent some time as guest at the monastery of Gorze, after which he became provost at the cathedral of Worms. In […]

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Doña Magdalena de Ulloa teaches noble charity to Don John of Austria

March 9, 2017

Doña Magdalena only allowed Jeromín [Don John of Austria] two days in which to rest from the fatigue of his journey, and to visit the village and castle; the third day, which was a Monday, she made him begin to regulate his hours and studies, according to the plans she had prepared. She had given […]

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Virtue began to seem more fitting for women

March 9, 2017

Note a curious thing. Books on the spiritual life began to be addressed more and more to women. And virtue itself began to take on a note of something more fitting to women than to men, although this was never part of the mentality of any saint.   (Excerpt from an MNF, Thursday, Sept. 14, […]

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March 10 – “I want no prayers from heretics!”

March 9, 2017

St. John Ogilvie Ogilvie, the son of a wealthy noble, was born into a Calvinist family near Keith in Banffshire, Scotland and was educated in mainland Europe where he attended a number of Roman Catholic educational establishments, under the Benedictines at Regensburg in Germany and with the Jesuits at Olomouc and Brno in the present […]

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March 11 – Saint Sophronius

March 9, 2017

Saint Sophronius Patriarch of Jerusalem and Greek ecclesiastical writer, b. about 560 at Damascus of noble parentage; d. probably March 11, 638, at Jerusalem. In company with John Moschus he traveled extensively through the East and also went to Rome. He probably became a monk in Egypt about 580 and later removed to Palestine. From […]

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March 11 – Constantine the Great

March 9, 2017

His coins give his name as M., or more frequently as C., Flavius Valerius Constantinus. He was born at Naissus, now Nisch in Servia [Nis, Serbia —Ed.], the son of a Roman officer, Constantius, who later became Roman Emperor, and St. Helena, a woman of humble extraction but remarkable character and unusual ability. The date […]

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March 11 – Saint under the Caliphs

March 9, 2017

St. Eulogius of Cordova Spanish martyr and writer who flourished during the reigns of the Cordovan Caliphs, Abd-er-Rahman II and Mohammed I (822-886). It is not certain on what date or in what year of the ninth century he was born; it must have been previous to 819, because in 848 he was a priest […]

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March 12 – The Mistaken Chronicler

March 9, 2017

St. Theophanes Chronicler, born at Constantinople, about 758; died in Samothracia, probably 12 March, 817, on which day he is commemorated in the Roman Martyrology. He was the son of Isaac, imperial governor of the islands of the White Sea, and of Theodora, of whose family nothing is known. After the early death of his […]

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March 13 – Though not a learned man, he established a school known today as Oxford

March 9, 2017

Bl. Agnellus of Pisa Friar Minor and founder of the English Franciscan Province, born at Pisa c. 1195, of the noble family of the Agnelli; died at Oxford, 7 May, 1236. In early youth he was received into the Seraphic Order by St. Francis himself, during the latter’s sojourn in Pisa, and soon became an […]

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March 13 – There Is No Price Tag on Happiness

March 9, 2017

St. Euphrasia (aka Eupraxia) Virgin, born in 380; died after 410. Antigonus, the father of this saint, was a nobleman of the first rank and quality in the court of Theodosius the younger, nearly allied in blood to that emperor, and honored by him with several great employments in the state. He was married to […]

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March 13 – St. Leander of Seville

March 9, 2017

St. Leander of Seville Bishop of that city, born at Carthage about 534, of a Roman family established in that city; died at Seville, 13 March, 600 or 601. Some historians claim that his father Severian was duke or governor of Carthage, but St. Isidore simply states that he was a citizen of that city. […]

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March 13 – St. Nicephorus

March 9, 2017

St. Nicephorus Patriarch of Constantinople, 806-815, b. about 758; d. 2 June, 829. This champion of the orthodox view in the second contest over the veneration of images belonged to a noted family of Constantinople. He was the son of the imperial secretary Theodore and his pious wife Eudoxia. Eudoxia was a strict adherent of […]

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