Monument in Halifax harbour to the imprisoned Acadians on Georges Island, Halifax during the Grand Dérangement of the 1750s and 1760s. Photo by Fralambert.

The group of six hundred Acadians from Halifax—including every living relative of Joseph and Alexandre Broussard, as well as the families of many of their associates in the Acadian resistance—arrived in Saint Domingue in January 1765. But the Broussards had no intention of remaining there. They soon hired another vessel, and with 193 Acadians continued on to New Orleans….

When the Broussards and their associates arrived in New Orleans, those [French] officials presented them with an opportunity to own land and raise cattle at Poste des Attakapas, a developing frontier station west of New Orleans on the verge of a treeless prairie…. The Broussards and their associates accepted the offer.

“Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil in Acadia”. Painted by Herb Roe. Photo by Heironymous Rowe.

Acting Louisiana governor Charles Philippe Aubry welcomed Joseph Broussard as a French hero. “In view of the proofs of valor, fidelity, and attachment in the service of the king, which the herein named Joseph Broussard, surnamed Beausoleil, Acadian, has given on different occasions…” read the commission Aubry signed on 8 April 1765, “We appoint him Captain of Militia and Commandant of the Acadians who have come with him.” This satisfying honor turned to be the capstone of Broussard’s life. Soon after the Acadians arrived at Attakapas, they were devastated by an epidemic of an unknown origin that claimed many lives. In September, Alexandre Broussard was struck down, and on 20 October, a Jesuit missionary recorded the death of his brother Joseph “at the camp known as Beausoleil.”

Acadians, painting by Samuel Scott

The two men had traveled a great distance from their birthplace along the Annapolis River early in the century. Long the leaders of the opposition to British rule, they had been unable to resist the campaign of removal. But they had successfully begun the transplantation of a way of life from the meadows of l’Acadie to the prairies of Louisiana.

John Mack Faragher, A Great and Noble Scheme: The Tragic Story of the Expulsion of the French Acadians from their American Homeland (New York: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 2005), 428-9.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 597

 

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By Alejandro Ezcurra Naón

Outrage is growing in western public opinion as news keeps coming in about the horrendous massacres perpetrated against Christians in Asia Minor and Africa by terrorists of the self-proclaimed“Islamic State” and their ilk. Many are beginning to wonder if one should call a new Crusade in defense of those peoples, victimized by an unprecedented war of extermination in the name of Allah.

Granted, the word “Crusade” brings a chill down the spine not only of liberals but also of Catholics bitten by the fly of progressivist relativism. Both have sought to stigmatize the notion of Crusade by associating it with abuse, greed, a desire for political domination, etc. Fortunately, however, they have failed.

While there were crusaders unworthy of the name, the image of the archetypical Crusader stands unscathed: the Christian knight whose idealism and virtues, proven over a thousand times, made him a unmatched paradigm in history of a perfectly accomplished model of a man of honor.

The saga of the Crusades was associated with the values ​​of chivalry to such degree that it endures to this day in the imagination of the West in a halo of well-deserved prestige. This is so much so that that the greatest compliment a man can receive on his moral qualities is, “so and so is a gentleman.”

The origin of the Crusades: defending oppressed Christians

Contrary to what we are led to believe, the Crusades were born to defend Christian populations in situations of weakness in the face of attack, abuse and harassment by Muslims (similar to those perpetrated by the “Islamic State” today).

In 1095, news of these abuses led Pope Urban II to convene the Council of Clermont, attended by 300 bishops and thousands of nobles. There, reports about the terrible plight of Christian pilgrims and inhabitants of the Holy Land, attacked and oppressed by Muslim powers, and the desecration of the holy places, led participants to cry “Deus vult!”  (“God wills it!”). A surge of courage and determination ran through the ranks of the knights present and quickly spread across France and Europe.

Thousands decided to take a vow of Crusade and leave for the Holy Land. Thus was born the first Crusade, which triumphantly culminated in 1099 with the conquest of Jerusalem, seized from Egypt by the legendary Godfrey of Bouillon and knights from France’s high nobility.

An epic saga driven and led by saints of the Church

Critics of the Crusades, eager to find defects, forget that the objective of that epic struggle was fully according to justice and that it was advocated and carried out by saints. The promoter of the First Crusade, Blessed Urban II, was a saint; so was the Mellifluous Doctor, Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, to whom we owe the beautiful prayer of the Memorare.  He provided the Knights Templar with their rule, including the famous vow to never retreat in the battlefield. Also saints were the Crusader Kings, Saint Louis IX of France (who commanded not just one, but two Crusades) and his Spanish cousin, Saint Fernando III of Castile and Leon, who in a few years, with unstoppable momentum, recovered half of Spain, including Cordoba and Seville, from the Moors.

Saint John Capistrano, usually shown with the flag with which he encouraged Christian soldiers to fight in the Siege of Belgrade.

Also canonized was the heroic Franciscan monk Saint John Capistrano, called “the pious father,” who at the risk of his life encouraged the Crusaders on the battlefield and was decisively instrumental in the victory against the Turks at Belgrade (1456); so was Pope Saint Pius V, who organized the great naval crusade which definitively broke the naval power of the Turks in the Gulf of Lepanto, in 1571; also a saint was Blessed Innocent XI, who called the Crusade against the Turks besieging Vienna (1683). He was helped in that undertaking by another Franciscan, Blessed Mark of Aviano, who helped organize the victorious Christian army which, outnumbered three to one (180,000 against 60,000), defeated the Turks and ended once and for all the Ottoman threat of land invasion into central Europe.

We could still cite many other saints with the crusading spirit, such as the charitable Saint Vincent of Paul, who was planning a Crusade to North Africa in order to stop pirates and kidnappers from the Maghreb, when death overtook him.

Saint Francis of Assisi defends the Crusades and urges the sultan to convert

Someone may object: “I do not understand John Capistrano and Mark of Aviano. How could such peaceful Franciscans become involved in a Crusade? Is this not in contradiction with their vocation as men of peace?”

The answer is: not at all! When Christendom is in danger, what could be more logical than to defend and support those who defend it? This is so much so that the same Saint Francis of Assisi set the example for his brethren: He accompanied the Fifth Crusade and courageously proclaimed its legitimacy before the sultan of Egypt himself!

Saint Francis before Sultan Malik al-Kamil. Fra Angelico ca. 1429, Lindenau Museum, Altenberg.

This bold and holy move took place in 1219, when Sultan Malik al-Kamil received Saint Francis in Damietta. His fellow traveler, Fray Illuminato, narrates the episode:

“The Sultan posed to him [Saint Francis] another question: “Your Lord teaches in the Gospels that you should not return evil for evil nor refuse your mantle to someone who wants to take your tunic. Therefore, you Christians should not invade our lands.”

“To which the Blessed Francis replied:

“I think you have not read the whole Gospel. Elsewhere, indeed, it is said: ‘If your eye causes you to sin, pluck it out and cast it from you.’ With that Jesus wanted to teach us that when a man has a relative, however beloved he must be, even if he was as dear as the apple of our eyes, if he tempted us to turn away from the faith and love of our God we should be resolved to separate, alienate and eradicate him from us. For all this, Christians act according to justice when they invade your lands and fight you, for you blaspheme the name of Christ and fight to take away from His religion as many as you can. However, if you want to know, confess and worship the Creator and Redeemer of the world, I will love you as myself.” All those present were taken with admiration by his response.[1]

The Saints are proposed by the Church as role models. When even Saint Francis of Assisi fully justifies, in the name of the Gospel, a Crusade against those who use violence to wrench souls from the faith of Jesus Christ, there is no reason in principle why Catholics should not imitate the Seraphic Father. This is what we are taught by the doctrine of the Church and by the example of her saints.

This being so, could God be asking Western Christian nations at this time to tackle Islamic extremism and prevent even greater evils to the world?

 

 

[1] “Fonti Francescane”, Third Section, Altre Testimonianze Francescane, N° 2691, accessed June 13, 2017, http://www.ofs-monza.it/files/altretestimonianzefrancescane.pdf

 

 

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Marcian

(Marcianus, Μαρκιᾶνος), Roman Emperor at Constantinople, born in Thrace about 390; died January, 457.

He became a soldier; during his early life he was poor, and it is said that he arrived at Constantinople with only two hundred pieces of gold, which he had borrowed. He served in the army under Ardaburius the Alan and his son Aspar; he distinguished himself in the wars against the Persians and Huns. Aspar was a kind of king-maker, and general- in-chief for the East (magister militum per orientem), also for a time the most powerful man at Constantinople. But since he was a foreigner and an Arian he could not be emperor himself. Instead he placed a succession of his favourites on the throne. One of these was Marcian. At Constantinople Marcian became a senator…

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Charles Martel

Born about 688; died at Quierzy on the Oise, 21 October, 741.

Charles MartelHe was the natural son of Pepin of Herstal and a woman named Alpaïde or Chalpaïde. Pepin, who died in 714, had outlived his two legitimate sons, Drogon and Grimoald, and to Theodoald, a son of the latter and then only six years old, fell the burdensome inheritance of the French monarchy.

Charles, who was then twenty-six, was not excluded from the succession on account of his birth, Theodoald himself being the son of a concubine, but through the influence of Plectrude, Theodoald’s grandmother, who wished the power invested in her own descendants exclusively. To prevent any opposition from Charles she had him cast into prison and, having established herself at Cologne, assumed the guardianship of her grandson. But the different nations whom the strong hand of Pepin of Herstal had held in subjection, shook off the yoke of oppression as soon as they saw that it was with a woman they had to deal…

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(Also known as Carlo d’Austria, Charles of Austria)

Born August 17, 1887, in the Castle of Persenbeug in the region of Lower Austria, his parents were the Archduke Otto and Princess Maria Josephine of Saxony, daughter of the last King of Saxony. Emperor Francis Joseph I was Charles’ Great Uncle.

Archduchess Maria Josefa of Austria (1867-1944) and sons Karl and Maximilian, 1910.

Archduchess Maria Josefa of Austria (1867-1944) and sons Karl and Maximilian, 1910.

Charles was given an expressly Catholic education and the prayers of a group of persons accompanied him from childhood, since a stigmatic nun prophesied that he would undergo great suffering and attacks would be made against him. That is how the “League of prayer of the Emperor Charles for the peace of the peoples” originated after his death. In 1963 it became a prayer community ecclesiastically recognized.

A deep devotion to the Holy Eucharist and to the Sacred Heart of Jesus began to grow in Charles. He turned to prayer before making any important decisions…
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Once upon a time, there was once a just and most Christian King of Britain, called Maurus. To him and to his wife Daria was born a little girl, the fairest creature that this earth ever saw. She came into the world wrapped in a hairy mantle, and all men wondered greatly what this might mean. Then the King gathered together his wise men to inquire of them. But they could not make known the thing to him, for only God in Heaven knew how the rough robe signified that she should follow holiness and purity all her days, and the wisdom of Saint John the Baptist. And because of the mantle, they called her Ursula, ‘Little Bear.’

Now Ursula grew day by day in grace and loveliness, and in such wisdom that all men marvelled. Yet should they not have marvelled, since with God all things are possible. And when she was fifteen years old she was a light of all wisdom, and a glass of all beauty, and a fountain of Scripture and of sweet ways. Lovelier woman there was not alive. Her speech was so full of all delight that it seemed…

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St. Wendelin of Trier

Born about 554; died probably in 617. His earliest biographies, two in Latin and two in German, did not appear until after 1417. Their narrative is the following: Wendelin was the son of a Scottish king; after a piously spent youth he secretly left his home on a pilgrimage to Rome. On his way back he settled as a hermit in Westricht in the Diocese of Trier. When a great landowner blamed him for his idle life he entered this lord’s service as a herdsman. Later a miracle obliged this lord to allow him to return to his solitude. Wendelin then established a company of hermits from which sprang the Benedictine Abbey of Tholey. He was consecrated abbot about 597, according to the later legends. Tholey was apparently founded as a collegiate body about 630…

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St. Ignatius of Constantinople

Born about 799; died 23 October, 877; son of Emperor Michael I and Procopia. His name, originally Nicetas, was changed at the age of fourteen to Ignatius. Leo the Armenian having deposed the Emperor Michael (813), made Ignatius a eunuch and incarcerated him in a monastery, that he might not become a claimant to his father’s throne. While thus immured he voluntarily embraced the religious life, and in time was made an abbot. He was ordained by Basil, Bishop of Paros, on the Hellespont. On the death of Theophilus (841) Theodora became regent, as well as co-sovereign with her son, Michael III, of the Byzantine Empire. In 847, aided by the good will of the empress, Ignatius succeeded to the Patriarchate of Constantinople, vacant by the death of Methodius. The Emperor Michael III was a youthful profligate who found a worthy companion for his…

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Blessed Thomas Thwing

Martyr. Born at Heworth Hall, near York, in 1635; suffered at York, 23 Oct., 1680. His father was George Thwing, Esq., of Kilton Castle and Heworth, nephew of Venerable Edward Thwing; his mother was Anne, sister of the venerable confessor Sir Thomas Gasciogne, of Barnbrow Hall…

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St. John of Capistrano

Born at Capistrano, in the Diocese of Sulmona, Italy, 1385; died 23 October, 1456.

His father had come to Naples in the train of Louis of Anjou, hence is supposed to have been of French blood, though some say he was of German origin. His father dying early, John owed his education to his mother. She had him at first instructed at home and then sent him to study law at Perugia, where he achieved great success under the eminent legist, Pietro de Ubaldis.

In 1412 he was appointed governor of Perugia by Ladislaus, King of Naples, who then held that city of the Holy See. As governor he set himself against civic corruption and bribery. War broke out in 1416 between Perugia and the Malatesta. John was sent as ambassador to propose peace to the Malatesta, who however cast him into prison. It was during this imprisonment that he began to think more seriously about his soul. He decided eventually to give up the world and become a Franciscan Friar, owing to a dream he had in which he saw St. Francis and was warned by the saint to enter the Franciscan Order. John had married a wealthy lady of Perugia immediately before the war broke out, but as the marriage was not consummated he obtained a dispensation to enter religion, which he did 4 October, 1416…

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St. Ignatius of Antioch

Also called Theophorus (ho Theophoros); born in Syria, around the year 50; died at Rome between 98 and 117.

More than one of the earliest ecclesiastical writers have given credence, though apparently without good reason, to the legend that Ignatius was the child whom the Savior took up in His arms, as described in Mark 9:35. It is also believed, and with great probability, that, with his friend Polycarp, he was among the auditors of the Apostle St. John. If we include St. Peter, Ignatius was the third Bishop of Antioch and the immediate successor of Evodius (Eusebius, “Hist. Eccl.”, II, iii, 22). Theodoret (“Dial. Immutab.”, I, iv, 33a, Paris, 1642) is the authority for the statement that St. Peter appointed Ignatius to the See of Antioch. St. John Chrysostom lays special emphasis on the honor conferred upon the martyr in receiving his episcopal consecration at the hands of the Apostles themselves (“Hom. in St. Ig.”, IV. 587). Natalis Alexander quotes Theodoret to the same effect (III, xii, art. xvi, p. 53)…

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The Battle of Cholet was fought on 17 October 1793 during the French Revolutionary Wars, between French Republican forces under General Léchelle and French Royalist Forces under Louis d’Elbée. The battle was fought in the town of Cholet in the Maine-et-Loire department of France, and resulted in a Republican victory. D’Elbée was wounded and captured; he was later executed by Republican troops in Noirmoutier. Royalist Charles Melchior Artus de Bonchamps was fatally wounded in the battle…

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Pope Pius III

(Francesco Todeschini Piccolomini).

Pope Pius IIIB. at Siena, 29 May, 1439; elected 22 Sept., 1503; d. in Rome, 18 Oct., 1503, after a pontificate of four weeks. Piccolomini was the son of a sister of Pius II. He had passed his boyhood in destitute circumstances when his uncle took him into his household, bestowed upon him his family name and arms, and superintended his training and education. He studied law in Perugia and immediately after receiving the doctorate as canonist was appointed by his uncle Archbishop of Siena, and on 5 March, 1460, cardinal-deacon with the title of S. Eustachio. The following month he was sent as legate to the March of Ancona, with the experienced Bishop of Marsico as his counsellor. “The only thing objectionable about him”, says Voigt (Enea Silvio, III, 531), “was his youth; for in the administration of his legation and in his later conduct at the curia he proved to be a man of spotless character and many-sided capacity.” He was sent by Paul II as legate to Germany, where he acquitted himself with eminent success, the knowledge of German that he had acquired in his uncle’s house being of great advantage to him. During the worldly reigns of Sixtus IV and Alexander VI he kept away from Rome as much as possible. Sigismondo de Conti, who knew him well tells us that “he left no moment unoccupied; his time for study was before daybreak; he spent his mornings in prayer and his midday hours in giving audiences, to which the humblest had easy access. He was so temperate in food and drink that he only allowed himself an evening meal every other day.” Yet this is the excellent man to whom Gregorovius in his “Lucrezia Borgia”, without a shadow of authority, gives a dozen children-the calumny being repeated by Brosch and Creighton. After the death of Alexander VI, the conclave could not unite on the principal candidates, d’Amboise, Rovere, and Sforza; hence the great majority cast their votes for Piccolomini, who though only sixty-four was, like his uncle, tortured with gout and was prematurely old. He took the name of Pius III in honour of his uncle, was crowned on 8 Oct., after receiving priestly and episcopal orders. The strain of the long ceremony was so great that the pope sank under it. He was buried in St. Peter’s, but his remains were later transferred to S. Andrea della Valle where he rests by the side of Pius II.

Subscription7

PASTOR, History of the Popes, VI, 185 sqq.; PANVINIO, Continuation of Platina; VON REUMONT, Gesch. der Stadt Rom; ARTAND DE MONTOR, History of the Popes (New York, 1867).

JAMES F. LOUGHLIN (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Destruction of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre

On October 18, 1009, under Fatimid caliph Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, orders for the complete destruction of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, also called the Church of the Resurrection, were carried out. The measures against the church were part of a more general campaign against Christian places of worship in Palestine and Egypt, which involved a great deal of other damage. Adhemar of Chabannes recorded that the church of St George at Lydda “with many other churches of the saints’ had been attacked, and the ‘basilica of the Lord’s Sepulchre destroyed down to the ground’”.
European reaction was of shock and dismay, with far-reaching and intense consequences.  Ultimately, this destruction provided an impetus to the later Crusades…

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Saint Philip Howard

Martyr, Earl of Arundel; born at Arundel House, London, 28 June 1557, died in the Tower of London, 19 October, 1595.

St. Philip HowardHe was the grandson of Henry, Earl of Surrey, the poet, executed by Henry VIII in 1547, and son of Thomas, Duke of Norfolk executed by Elizabeth 1572. Philip II of Spain, then King of England, was one of his godfathers. His father, who had conformed to the State religion, educated him partly under John Foxe, the Protestant martyrologist and he was afterwards sent to Cambridge…

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St. Isaac Jogues

St. Isaac JoguesFrench missionary, born at Orléans, France, 10 January, 1607; martyred at Ossernenon, in the present State of New York, 18 October, 1646. He was the first Catholic priest who ever came to Manhattan Island (New York). He entered the Society of Jesus in 1624 and, after having been professor of literature at Rouen, was sent as a missionary to Canada in 1636. He came out with Montmagny, the immediate successor of Champlain. From Quebec he went to the regions around the great lakes where the illustrious Father de Brébeuf and others were…

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St. Peter of Alcántara

Born at Alcántara, Spain, 1499; died 18 Oct., 1562. His father, Peter Garavita, was the governor of the place, and his mother was of the noble family of Sanabia. After a course of grammar and philosophy in his native town, he was sent, at the age of fourteen, to the University of Salamanca. Returning home, he became a Franciscan in the convent of the Stricter Observance at Manxaretes in 1515. At the age of twenty-two he was sent to found a new community of the Stricter Observance at Badajoz. He was ordained priest in 1524, and the following year made guardian of the convent of St. Mary of the Angels at Robredillo. A few years later he began preaching with much success. He preferred to preach to the poor; and his sermons, taken largely from the Prophets and Sapiential Books, breathe the tenderest human sympathy. The reform of the “Discalced Friars” had, at the time when Peter entered the order, besides the convents in Spain, the Custody of Sta. Maria Pietatis in Portugal, subject to the General of the Observants…

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According to USA Today:

As the descendant of both Christopher Columbus and Montezuma II, the Aztec emperor, it is only natural that I would be interested in the debate over Columbus’ legacy in America.

History has some truly evil people. Columbus is certainly not one of them. Most often, history is not made up of perfect people and evil ones, but of complex people who must be understood in context.

What is happening at the hands of Columbus’ detractors is political, not historical. As his direct descendant and namesake, I should know.

What is lacking in the anti-Columbus narrative is any sense of history…

To read the entire article in USA Today, please click here.

 

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Portrait of Marie Louise Thérèse de Savoie, Princess de Lamballe by Antoine-François Callet.

Toward six o clock the next morning, the turnkey entered with a frightened air: “They are coming here,” he said to the prisoners. Six men, armed with sabers, guns, and pistols, followed him, approached the beds, asked the names of the women, and went out again.

Madame de Tourzel, who shared the Princess de Lamballe’s captivity, said to her: “This threatens to be a terrible day, dear Princess; we know not what Heaven intends for us; we must ask God to forgive our faults. Let us say the Miserere and the Confiteor as acts of contrition, and recommend ourselves to His goodness.”  The two women said their prayers aloud, and incited each other to resignation and courage.

Marie Antoinette and the Downfall of Royalty by Imbert de Saint-Amand. 1892, Charles Scribner’s Sons.  Pg. 351

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 596

 

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For eight centuries, the Cross and Islam were engaged in a fight to the death in Spain that ended only when the troops of the Catholic Kings seized Granada and expelled the last Moslem ruler from the peninsula.

The Capitulation of Granada, Painting by Francisco Pradilla y Ortiz. Boabdil gives the keys of the city to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella

The reasons for this mortal opposition were multiple. On the religious plane, it was explained by an unyielding difference of doctrines, by the violent contrast between the morality of the Gospel and Mohammedan depravation and by the twofold purpose which the followers of Mohammed had of impeding the preaching of Christianity in the lands they dominated and subjugating the Catholic nations by force, extinguishing our holy Religion in them.

The long epic of the Christian Reconquest was inspired by an ardent faith and a sublime intransigence. This intransigence did not exclude, however, an attitude of intelligent discernment regarding the values of the Arab civilization. Because of this, having exterminated Mohammedanism, the conquerors conserved numerous monuments raised by the vanquished, even consecrating various mosques to the worship of the true God.

Religious syncretism? Who could accuse the heroes of the Reconquest of this repulsive error?

No, the reason for this is another. Mohammedanism, like so many other false religions, was not able to influence so profoundly its faithful as to extinguish in them all love for the truth, moral sense, and consequently, artistic inspiration. On the contrary, these values, nourished by a natural uprightness that persisted to a good extent and, by precious cultural traditions, continued to develop, gave rise to cultures and artistic systems that are admirable under several aspects. The conquerors of Islam — moved by the spirit of the Church, which neither despises nor rejects man’s upright and good works — prudently mobilized the vigilance of the Inquisition against the remnants of Mohammed while lovingly conserving the marvels of Arabian art and legitimately consecrating them to divine worship.

An outstanding expression of this is found in the interior of the former mosque of Cordoba, today a Catholic cathedral. Numerous arches, ingeniously superimposed over one another, bestow dignity, lightness and undeniable enchantment to the ambience. The soul naturally feels inclined to leave the commonplace and elevate itself to noble and serene thoughts. Of course, in this work there can be nothing of the breath of faith that makes the Sainte Chapelle of Paris, or Assisi, as it were, antechambers of heaven. All in all, it lacks the supernatural, but no one could say that the sacred ceremonies of our liturgy could not properly develop in this naturally harmonious and dignified ambience.

Could one say the same of any of these three buildings? For what are they destined? A gymnasium? A cinema? A club? A theater?A warehouse? A factory? These inelegant, heavy and brutally simple forms have about them something gloomy, proletariat (in the worst meaning of the word) and vulgar. An immanent mystery seems to act within them like the law of gravity so that their walls and roofs tend to sink to the ground. It is a movement quite opposed to that by which souls tend to raise themselves toward heaven. How this differs from the noble lightness of an Arabian minaret, to say nothing of a Gothic tower.

These are three ultra-modern churches, one Protestant, another Jewish, and the last, Catholic, on an American university campus. None of them bears any trace of their respective traditions or spirit. Placed thus side by side, they seem to be three equally legitimate species of one same genus, the religion genus. A like spirit gives them all a like physiognomy.

One has the impression that they have just one soul, that the force which fastens them to the ground is an immanent, sinister and cold mystery, giving them an aspect of three drops of the same liquid, three boxes filled with the same substance, three factories producing the same product.

It is, in our way of seeing, the very soul of contemporary neopaganism, the archetype of the worst of everything that ancient paganism had, corroding all the cultural manifestations in which it is nestled much more efficaciously than did ancient paganism and reducing everything to desolating uniformity.

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October 15 – Casimir Pulaski

October 12, 2017

Casimir Pulaski Patriot and soldier, born at Winiary, Poland, 4 March, 1748; died on the Wasp, in the harbour of Savannah, 11 Oct., 1779; eldest son of Count Joseph Pulaski and Maria Zislinska. His father, a noted jurist, reared him for the bar, and he received his military training, as a youth, in the guard […]

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October 15 – Interior Castle

October 12, 2017

St. Teresa of Avila Teresa Sanchez Cepeda Davila y Ahumada, born at Avila, Old Castile, 28 March, 1515; died at Alba de Tormes, 4 Oct., 1582. The third child of Don Alonso Sanchez de Cepeda by his second wife, Doña Beatriz Davila y Ahumada, who died when the saint was in her fourteenth year, Teresa […]

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October 13 – King Confessor

October 12, 2017

St. Edward the Confessor Saint, King of England, born in 1003; died January 5, 1066. He was the son of Ethelred II and Emma, daughter of Duke Richard of Normandy, being thus half-brother to King Edmund Ironside, Ethelred’s son by his first wife, and to King Hardicanute, Emma’s son by her second marriage with Canute. […]

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October 15 – St. Bruno of Querfurt

October 12, 2017

St. Bruno of Querfurt (Also called BRUN and BONIFACE). Second Apostle of the Prussians and martyr, born about 970; died 14 February, 1009. He is generally represented with a hand cut off, and is commemorated on 15 October. Bruno was a member of the noble family of Querfurt and is commonly said to have been […]

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October 16 – Marie Antoinette, Archduchess of Austria, Queen of France and Capetian Widow

October 12, 2017

by Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira Most Reverend Monsignor Director of this Academy, Gentlemen Academicians: A simple listing of the titles with which she was known during her short life as Marie Antoinette of Habsburg, and later Marie Antoinette of Bourbon, brings to memory the series of extraordinary and unforeseen events that together make up the […]

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October 16 – Duchess and saint

October 12, 2017

St. Hedwig Duchess of Silesia, born about 1174, at the castle of Andechs; died at Trebnitz, 12 or 15 October, 1243. She was one of eight children born to Berthold IV, Count of Andechs and Duke of Croatia and Dalmatia. Of her four brothers, two became bishops, Ekbert of Bamberg, and Berthold of Aquileia; Otto […]

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October 16 – Marie Antoinette

October 12, 2017

Queen of France. Born at Vienna, 2 November, 1755; executed in Paris, 16 October, 1793. She was the youngest daughter of Francis I, German Emperor, and of Maria Theresa. The marriage of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette was one of the last acts of Choiseul’s policy; but the Dauphiness from the first shared the unpopularity […]

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October 16 – Apostle of the Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus

October 12, 2017

St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Religious of the Visitation Order. Apostle of the Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, born at Lhautecour, France, 22 July, 1647; died at Paray-le-Monial, 17 October, 1690. Her parents, Claude Alacoque and Philiberte Lamyn, were distinguished less for temporal possessions than for their virtue, which gave them an honourable position. […]

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Why celebrate Columbus Day?

October 9, 2017

Columbus and Divine Providence by Jeremias Wells Christopher Columbus certainly ranks as one of the greatest men of achievement the world has ever known, and also justly one of the most renowned, for the entire history of Europeans in America originated from his vision, religious sense and adventurous spirit. As can be expected in a […]

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Columbus, and how to make Key Lime Pie

October 9, 2017

When Christopher Columbus discovered the New World on October 12, 1492–a feat that earned for him the title of Admiral of the Indies and for his grandson Louis and his descendants in perpetuity the noble title of Duke of Veragua–he introduced into the Americas the greatest treasure possible: the Catholic Faith. However, his epic Atlantic […]

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Who Was Christopher Columbus, and Why Is He Important?

October 9, 2017

Christopher Columbus (Italian CRISTOFORO COLOMBO; Spanish CRISTOVAL COLON.) Born at Genoa, or on Genoese territory, probably 1451; died at Valladolid, Spain, 20 May 1506. His family was respectable, but of limited means, so that the early education of Columbus was defective. Up to his arrival in Spain (1485) only one date has been preserved. His […]

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October 10 – How to overcome bad ancestry

October 9, 2017

St. Francis Borgia (also known as Francisco de Borja y Aragon), born 28 October, 1510, was the son of Juan Borgia, third Duke of Gandia, and of Juana of Aragon; died 30 September, 1572. The future saint was unhappy in his ancestry. His grandfather, Juan Borgia, the second son of Alexander VI, was assassinated in Rome […]

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October 10 – St. Paulinus, Archbishop of York

October 9, 2017

St. Paulinus Archbishop of York, died at Rochester, 10 October, 644. He was a Roman monk in St. Andrew’s monastery at Rome, and was sent by St. Gregory the Great in 601, with St. Mellitus and others, to help St. Augustine and to carry the pallium to him. He laboured in Kent — with the […]

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October 11 – Model Archduke, both spiritual and temporal

October 9, 2017

St. Bruno the Great, Archbishop of Cologne Bruno the Great (or Bruno I) (925–965) was Archbishop of Cologne, Germany, from 953 until his death, and Duke of Lotharingia from 954. He was the brother of Otto I, king of Germany and later Holy Roman Emperor. Bruno was the youngest son of Henry the Fowler and […]

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October 11 – He dared step into the gap during the crisis

October 9, 2017

Pope Boniface VIII (BENEDETTO GAETANO) Born at Anagni about 1235; died at Rome, 11 October, 1303. Benedetto Cardinal Gaetano strongly advised Pope Celestine V to issue a constitution, either before or simultaneously with his abdication, declaring the legality of a papal resignation and the competency of the College of Cardinals to accept it. Ten days […]

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October 12 – Difficulties in his youth prepared him for later trials

October 9, 2017

St. Wilfrid Bishop of York, son of a Northumbrian thegn, born in 634; died at Oundle in Northamptonshire, 709. He was unhappy at home, through the unkindness of a stepmother, and in his fourteenth year he was sent away to the Court of King Oswy, King of Northumbria. Here he attracted the attention of Queen […]

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October 12 – Martyr King

October 9, 2017

St. Edwin The first Christian King of Northumbria, born about 585, son of Aella, King of Deira, the southern division of Northumbria; died October 12, 633. Upon Aella’s death in 588, the sovereignty over both divisions of Northumbria was usurped by Ethebric of Bernicia, and retained at his death by his son Ethelfrid; Edwin, Aella’s […]

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Catholic and Muslim Reactions to the News of the Turkish Defeat at Lepanto

October 5, 2017

[King] Philip was attending vespers in Madrid—or the Escorial—when the Venetian Ambassador—or an aide, as the case may be—slipped into his chapel to acquaint him with the news. The imperturbable monarch displayed neither pleasure nor annoyance at the interruption, and impassively resumed his devotions. Only when vespers ended did he reveal any emotion. Summoning the […]

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Splendor of a Hierarchical and Christian Conception of Life

October 5, 2017

Catolicismo, No. 70 – October 1956 (*) By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira The satanic wave of egalitarianism, which, from the sixteenth-century Protestant revolution to the communist revolution of our time, has been attacking, slandering, undermining and depleting all hierarchy and anything that symbolizes it, presents all inequality as an injustice. It is in human nature […]

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October 6 – Princes and popes coveted the advice of this silent man

October 5, 2017

St. Bruno Confessor, ecclesiastical writer, and founder of the Carthusian Order. He was born at Cologne about the year 1030; died 6 October, 1101. He is usually represented with a death’s head in his hands, a book and a cross, or crowned with seven stars; or with a roll bearing the device O Bonitas. His […]

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October 7 – How the Rosary saved Christendom

October 5, 2017

by Jeremias Wells The Feast of Our Lady of the Rosary Here is but a small fraction of the victories directly obtained from God through the Holy Rosary: The Battle of Lepanto which saved Rome and Vienna, and thus the Pope and the Emperor, from Moslem subjugation The deliverance of Vienna by Sobieski The victory […]

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Lepanto: Turkish might buckles in the grandest naval battle of History

October 5, 2017

The Turkish fleet came on imposing and terrible, all sails set, impelled by a fair wind, and it was only half a mile from the line of galliasses and another mile from the line of the Christian ships. D. John waited no longer; he humbly crossed himself, and ordered that the cannon of challenge should […]

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October 8 – St. Keyne

October 5, 2017

Keyne was a princess, one of the many children of King Brycan of South Wales. Growing up into a very beautiful young woman she was sought in marriage by many noble lords, but resolutely refused all of them. Instead, she took a vow of virginity and retired into solitude. It was after this resolution that […]

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October 9 – Superb and valiant knight

October 5, 2017

Baron Athanase-Charles-Marie Charette de la Contrie Born at Nantes, 3 Sept., 1832; died at Basse-Motte (Ille-et-Vilaine), 9 Oct., 1911. His father was a nephew of the famous General Charette who was shot at Nantes, 29 March, 1795, during the rising of the Vendee. His mother, Louise, Countess de Vierzon, was the daughter of the Duc […]

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October 9 – Royal penitent

October 5, 2017

Bl. Gunther A hermit in Bohemia in the eleventh century; born about 955; died at Hartmanitz, Bohemia, 9 Oct., 1045. The son of a noble family, he was a cousin of St. Stephen, the King of Hungary, and is numbered among the ancestors of the princely house of Schwarzburg. He passed the earlier of his […]

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October 9 – Even in his lifetime his reputation was for great holiness and miraculous powers

October 5, 2017

St. John Twenge Canon regular, Prior of St. Mary’s, Bridlington, born near the town, 1319; died at Bridlington, 1379. He was of the Yorkshire family Twenge, which family in Reformation days supplied two priest-martyrs and was also instrumental in establishing the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Bar Convent, York. John completed his studies […]

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October 9 – St. Louis Bertrand

October 5, 2017

St. Louis Bertrand Born at Valencia, Spain, 1 Jan., 1526; died 9 Oct., 1581. His patents were Juan Bertrand and Juana Angela Exarch. Through his father he was related to the illustrious St. Vincent Ferrer, the great thaumaturgus of the Dominican Order. The boyhood of the saint was unattended by any of the prodigies that […]

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October 3 – Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

October 2, 2017

(December 13, 1908 – October 3, 1995) Brazilian intellectual and Catholic activist. Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira was born in São Paulo to Lucilia Corrêa de Oliveira, a devout Roman Catholic, and educated by Jesuits. In 1928 he joined the Marian Congregations of São Paulo and soon became a leader of that organization. In 1933 he […]

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October 3 – Mother Théodore Guérin

October 2, 2017

Many of the early pioneers faced the hardships of this country where wars, famine and disease were the norm. Leaving everything behind, heroic souls came not only to save the souls of Indian nations, but also to minister to these frontier families. One such person was St. Mother Théodore Guérin, who became the eighth American Saint […]

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October 3 – Military turned monk

October 2, 2017

St. Gérard, Abbot of Brogne Born at Staves in the county of Namur, towards the end of the ninth century; died at Brogne or St-Gérard, 3 Oct. 959. The son of Stance, of the family of dukes of Lower Austrasia, and of Plectrude, sister of Stephen, Bishop of Liège, the young Gérard, like most men […]

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October 3 – Enemy of King St. Louis, but still his friend in Christ

October 2, 2017

St. Thomas of Hereford (THOMAS DE CANTELUPE). Born at Hambledon, Buckinghamshire, England, about 1218; died at Orvieto, Italy, 25 August, 1282. He was the son of William de Cantelupe and Millicent de Gournay, and thus a member of an illustrious and influential family. He was educated under the care of his uncle, Walter de Cantelupe, […]

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October 4 – He copied the Church of the Holy Sepulchre

October 2, 2017

St. Petronius Bishop of Bologna, date of birth unknown; died before 450. The only certain historical information we possess concerning him is derived from a letter written by Bishop Eucherius of Lyons (died 450-5) to Valerianus (in P. L., L, 711 sqq.) and from Gennadius’ “De viris illustribus”, XLI (ed. Czapla, Münster, 1898, p. 94). […]

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October 4 – He chose a greater chivalry

October 2, 2017

St. Francis of Assisi Founder of the Franciscan Order, born at Assisi in Umbria, in 1181 or 1182 — the exact year is uncertain; died there, 3 October, 1226. His father, Pietro Bernardone, was a wealthy Assisian cloth merchant. Of his mother, Pica, little is known, but she is said to have belonged to a […]

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October 5 – St. Galla

October 2, 2017

A Roman widow of the sixth century; feast, 5 October. According to St. Gregory the Great (Dial. IV, ch. xiii) she was the daughter of the younger Symmachus, a learned and virtuous patrician of Rome, whom Theodoric had unjustly condemned to death (525). Becoming a widow before the end of the first year of her […]

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October 5 – Second founder of the Dominicans

October 2, 2017

Bl. Raymond of Capua Called “the second founder of the Dominicans”, Raymond della Vigna was born in Capua of a prominent family in the kingdom of Naples. He entered the Dominican Order when attending the university in Bologna and went on to fill several posts, including prior in Rome and lector in Florence and Siena… […]

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October 5 – Blessed Francis Xavier Seelos

October 2, 2017

Francis X. Seelos Born at Füssen, Bavaria, 11 January, 1819; died at New Orleans, La., 4 Oct., 1867. When a child, asked by his mother what he intended to be, he pointed to the picture of his patron, St. Francis Xavier, and said: “I’m going to be another St. Francis.” He pursued his studies in […]

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September 29 – The Angelic Inspiration of Chivalry

September 28, 2017

Saints Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael _____________________ Saint Michael the Archangel: “Who is like God?” In Hebraic, mîkâ’êl, means “Who is like God?” The Scriptures refer to the Archangel Saint Michael in four different passages: two of them, in Daniel’s prophesy (chap. 10, 13 and 21; and chap. 12, 1); one in Saint Jude Thaddeus (single […]

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Poll: 58% of Belgians Want Country To Remain A Monarchy

September 28, 2017

According to The Royal Forums: A new poll conducted for Belgian royalty program Place Royale has shown that 58.2% of respondents want Belgium to remain a monarchy in the future. 1,000 people were surveyed by IVOX, a research agency, earlier this month to ascertain support for the monarchy across a cross-section of the populace. They […]

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Death of Charles V: Doña Magdalena’s intuition that Don John of Austria is his natural son

September 28, 2017

Doña Magdalena and Jeromín [Don John of Austria’s childhood name until it was revealed that he was the natural son of Charles V] never rested; since dawn messengers had never ceased coming from Yuste with news, and since the same hour the noble lady came and went from the oratory, where she prayed and wept, […]

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Dignity and Distinction for both Great and Small

September 28, 2017

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira Sir Winston Churchill – born of an American mother and an English father – reached the apex of human greatness in his country, and attained it deservedly by his exceptional talents, the unusual scope of his personality, and the merit of the many services he rendered his country during the […]

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