St. Ladislaus

Photo of the Reliquary of King Saint Ladislaus I of Hungary by Asybaris01 and located in the Cathedral of Győr.

Photo of the Reliquary of King Saint Ladislaus I of Hungary by Asybaris01 and located in the Cathedral of Győr.

King of Hungary, born 1040; died at Neutra, 29 July, 1095; one of Hungary’s national Christian heroes. He was the son of Béla I; the nobles, after the death of Geisa I, passed over Solomon, son of Andrew I, and chose Ladislaus to be their king in 1077. It is true that he made peace with Solomon, when the latter gave up all claims to the throne of Hungary; however, later on he rebelled against Ladislaus, who took him prisoner and held in the fortress of Visegrád. On the occasion of the canonization of Stephen I, Ladislaus gave Solomon his freedom, but in 1086 Solomon, with the aid of the heathen Cumans, revolted against Ladislaus a second time; the latter, however, vanquished them, and in 1089 gained another victory over the Turkish Cumans. In 1091 Ladislaus marched into Croatia, at the request of his sister, the widowed Queen Helena…

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St. Cyril of Alexandria

Doctor of the Church. St. Cyril has his feast in the Western Church on the 28th of January; in the Greek Menaea it is found on the 9th of June, and (together with St. Athanasius) on the 18th of January.

He seems to have been of an Alexandrian family and was the son of the brother of Theophilus, Patriarch of Alexandria; if he is the Cyril addressed by Isidore of Pelusium in Ep. xxv of Bk. I, he was for a time a monk. He accompanied Theophilus to Constantinople when that bishop held the “Synod of the Oak” in 402 and deposed St. John Chrysostom. Theophilus died 15 Oct., 412, and on the 18th Cyril was consecrated his uncle’s successor, but only after a riot between his supporters and those of his rival Timotheus. Socrates complains bitterly that one of his first acts was to plunder and shut the churches of the…

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June 28 – St. Irenaeus

June 26, 2017

St. Irenaeus

Bishop of Lyons, and Father of the Church.

Saint IrenaeusInformation as to his life is scarce, and in some measure inexact. He was born in Proconsular Asia, or at least in some province bordering thereon, in the first half of the second century; the exact date is controverted, between the years 115 and 125, according to some, or, according to others, between 130 and 142. It is certain that, while still very young, Irenaeus had seen and heard the holy Bishop Polycarp (d. 155) at Smyrna. During the persecution of Marcus Aurelius, Irenaeus was a priest of the…

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Pope Saint Paul I

Pope Saint Paul I reigned from 757 to 767

Date of birth unknown; died at Rome, 28 June, 767. He was a brother of Pope Stephen II. They had been educated for the priesthood at the Lateran palace.

Stephen entrusted his brother, who approved of the pope’s course in respect to King Pepin, with many important ecclesiastical affairs, among others with the restoration to the Roman States of the cities which had been seized by the Lombard Kings Aistulf and Desiderius; these cities …

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According to the Royal Household:

Over 1400 parading soldiers, 200 horses and 400 musicians come together each June in a great display of military precision, horsemanship and fanfare to mark The Queen’s official birthday.

The streets are lined with crowds waving flags as the parade moves from Buckingham Palace and down The Mall to Horse Guard’s Parade…

After the military bands have performed, the escorted Regimental Colour, or flag, is processed down the ranks of soldiers.

Her Majesty is then joined by other Members of the Royal Family on the balcony at Buckingham Palace to watch a fly-past by the Royal Air Force.

To read the entire post by the Royal Household, please click here.

Pictures may be found here.

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According to the Crown Chronicles:

Today’s State Opening of Parliament was a casual affair…

Her Majesty arrived at the Houses of Parliament in a Bentley…instead of the traditional horse-drawn carriages.

The Imperial State Crown arrived ahead of the Royals, also in a car. The crown only leaves the Tower of London for coronations and the opening.

The Queen read out a speech, which sets out the government’s plans for the next year; however, this Queen’s Speech is to last for two sessions. 2018’s State Opening of Parliament has been cancelled, in order to ‘provide stability’ whilst Brexit negotiations are ongoing.

To read the entire article on the Crown Chronicles, please click here.

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Following The Stars To Santiago – Part II

By now, I am well along the way and have come to one of the most meaningful monuments of the walk, “the Iron Cross” in the province of Leon. Each pilgrim continues a thousand-year-old tradition of placing a stone at the foot of this cross. Over the centuries the small mound of stones has become a real mountain that serves as a pedestal for the small iron cross. Each stone is a tribute to a history full of hope and desire. In Roman times, similar mounds where called “hills of Mercury,” the god of pilgrims, and served for territorial demarcation. Centuries afterward, the hermit Glaucoma, protector of the pilgrims in these parts, placed a cross upon these mounds, Christianizing these ancient monuments. The Iron Cross is also a place where pilgrims leave messages for others following along the way.

After traveling more than 400 miles, one begins to think he has seen everything, but this age-old journey does not cease to surprise, even in its most minute details.  I would never have imagined what I came across in a church in the city of Cacabelos: an old and pious image of the Child Jesus playing cards with Saint Anthony of Padua. It was even more surprising to discover that the locals have a very tender devotion to these two illustrious card players. In this same city there is a hospital for pilgrims built in the twelfth century. It presently serves as a restaurant where pilgrims can regain their strength with a delightful meat pie and good wine, completely free of charge. One need only prove that he is truly a pilgrim.

The land becomes noticeably greener as one approaches Galicia. The seemingly unending plains are left behind, and nature begins to reward the pilgrim with verdant panoramas. Cebreiro is the first village encountered. The place lies on a plateau almost 4,000 feet above sea level, requiring a long, steep climb to reach it. Frequent rains make the path muddy and the climb all the more difficult. In this small village, where homes are still built in an ancient style using only stone and straw without any sort of mortar, Providence deigned to work an impressive Eucharistic miracle. According to tradition, in the fourteenth century, a tired peasant arrived at the church of Cebreiro to hear Mass. He had come from a little village at the foot of the mountain and had trudged through a strong snowstorm to reach his destination. The monk celebrating the Mass had much less faith than the peasant; scorning the peasant in his heart, he thought him foolish to undergo such hardship to come to Mass. Immediately, the Sacred Species was visibly converted into the Body and Blood of Christ.  This Eucharistic miracle is preserved until today in this same church over the tombs of the two anonymous protagonists.

Santiago de Compostela

The Galician landscape is dotted with small villages where life has not changed in many centuries. The fresh aromatic scent of the vast eucalyptus forest reminded me of the Australian bush. The gum trees first came to Galicia last century with the famous Spanish Benedictine missionary Bishop Rosendo Salvado, who had been a zealous apostle among the Aborigine people in Western Australia. One of the few physical consolations of the walk is in the area of gastronomy. A good lunch in one of the typical old inns is just what the body needs to continue. Each region offers its own diversity of impressive products, and it is traditional to stop for the local specialties. The Galician village of Melide, for example, prepares the region’s best octopus. It is hard to fathom how such a delicious dish can be made with an animal that seems so unpleasant.

Santiago de Compostela

While one is on the long road of solitude, God whispers special graces into the soul, inspiring good thoughts and new resolutions. Walking all day every day has already become second nature, and one wonders what will happen when, finishing the pilgrimage, he returns to daily life. After following the same path that saints, kings, and souls of Faith have walked for centuries, everything else seems a bit insipid. Then a special emotion sets in as one realizes he will reach Santiago in a matter of days, and Our Lady begins to prepare him spiritually for that moment.

At last, Santiago lay before me. The first view of the towers of the cathedral is from the Mount of Joy, well named for the joy pilgrims experience with their first glimpse of the Shrine. Profoundly moved, I came gradually closer to the city gate. Trying to take advantage of the last remnants of interior solitude, I was unable to speak with the other pilgrims. Tradition dictates that a Holy Year pilgrim to Compostela enter through the Holy Door of the cathedral in order to receive the indulgences granted by the Church. That door, generally closed and barred, is opened only when Saint James’ feast day falls on a Sunday, a tradition dating back many centuries. On the last day of the year preceding a Holy Year, the bishop breaks the seal on the Holy Door with a silver hammer in a ceremony watched with great interest by all Spain. The door then remains open the entire year.

After entering through the Holy Door, one first “hugs” the Saint, represented by a beautiful stone bust over the main altar. Beneath the altar lie the remains of the Apostle, which were rediscovered in 1879 after being hidden from raiding English pirates under Sir Francis Drake 300 years earlier. Mass was being celebrated as I entered the cathedral,   and   the   famous “botafumeiro”— a huge thurible handled by eight men — was swinging from one side of the church to the other, releasing an enormous cloud of incense.

Julian Martin – our pilgrim- “I had finally arrived!”

I had finally arrived! The relics of the great Apostle were but a few feet away! Tears flowed down my sunburned face, just like the other pilgrims. The feeling in one’s soul at this moment is very difficult to describe. It can be understood only by one who has carried a pouch on his shoulders along that 550 miles of history toward the field of the star.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 582

 

 

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By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

The problem is, for you to have the spirit of chivalry you need to be fully imbued with the sublimity of what you do, and to love this sublimity. If you do not do that, you will not have the true spirit of the knight.

You may say: “If we see ourselves in this light, we will become proud.”

No you won’t. You won’t because he who loves true sublimity, not the sublimity of his person, but the sublimity of his [fighting] vocation – and here is the question – the sublimity of that for which he was made, for which he was called, of what he has to do; he who was invited to this by grace and says yes, elevates himself instead of falling into pride.

It would be pride for him to imagine, “Look how formidable I have become! I am now a boss in this or that!” Then he falls into pride. But this is not chivalry.

St. Alphonsus leaving his sword at the feet of Our Lady.

Chivalry is for man to think, “I am a knight of God and of the Virgin and am here facing the adversaries, I’m in the battle.” This is chivalry.

It was much easier for a knight of the Middle Ages to become proud than for you. Because a man all decked up in armor, riding a horse in the street with everyone looking and finding it beautiful, would be like a man today riding around in a Rolls Royce or something of the sort. A great horse with a beautiful armor was the equivalent to a Rolls Royce today, but with much more elevation than even a Rolls Royce today. Well, while that man was still moving about in Christian lands, he would feel the object of general admiration, and so it was very easy for him to become proud.

Today you almost run the opposite risk: that of losing your combativeness for not having the courage to look at the sublimity of your [fighting] vocation and be conscious of your dignity, walking with your heads high knowing that others will mock and despise you, etc. This is what we must do.

Well, so in order for you to acquire the spirit of chivalry you need to acquire more and more the notion of the marvel that you are carrying out.

(Excerpt from a Tea, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 1989 – Nobility.org translation)

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St. Etheldreda

Statue of St Etheldreda on the West Front of Salisbury Cathedral, UK.

Statue of St Etheldreda on the West Front of Salisbury Cathedral, UK.

Queen of Northumbria; born (probably) about 630; died at Ely, 23 June, 679.

While still very young she was given in marriage by her father, Anna, King of East Anglia, to a certain Tonbert, a subordinate prince, from whom she received as morning gift a tract of land locally known as the Isle of Ely. She never lived in wedlock with Tonbert, however, and for five years after his early death was left to foster her vocation to religion.

Her father then arranged for her a marriage of political convenience with Egfrid, son and heir to Oswy, King of Northumbria. From this second…

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St. John the Baptist

The principal sources of information concerning the life and ministry of St. John the Baptist are the canonical Gospels. Of these St. Luke is the most complete, giving as he does the wonderful circumstances accompanying the birth of the Precursor and items on his ministry and death. St. Matthew’s Gospel stands in close relation with that of St. Luke, as far as John’s public ministry is concerned, but contains nothing in reference to his early life. From St. Mark, whose account of the Precursor’s life is very meagre, no new detail can be gathered. Finally, the fourth Gospel has this special feature, that it gives the testimony of St. John after the Saviour’s baptism. Besides the indications supplied by these writings, passing allusions occur in such passages as Acts, xiii, 24; xix, 1-6; but these are few and bear on the subject only indirectly. To the above should be added that Josephus relates in his Jewish Antiquities (XVIII, v, 2), but…

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by Antonio Borrelli

A young Maria Clotilde of Savoy.

Maria Clotilde of Savoy is one of the most striking examples of how to achieve union with Christ while remaining in the world in environments which by their nature lead instead to distraction, pride of power, luxury and a worldly lifestyle, things once usually abundant in the royal and imperial courts of Europe.

She was born in Turin on 2 March 1843, the eldest of eight children of King Vittorio Emanuele II and Queen Maria Adelaide of Austria. From her parents and grandparents, Carlo Alberto and Maria Teresa, rulers of Piedmont and Sardinia, she received an excellent religious education and was attracted to Jesus from an early age. In order to increase her love of Christ, she read and assimilated the writings of Bourdalone, Father Croiset, and Massillon.

As her mother died prematurely, she took an interest in helping her orphaned siblings. On 11 June 1853, in the castle of Stupinigi she received her first Holy Communion; and on that day, memorable for all children, Maria Clotilde wrote her plans for the future, including one of absolute simplicity: “Jesus, from now on I want to act only to please Thee.”

Princess Ludovica Teresa Maria Clotilde of Savoy (March 2, 1843 – June 25, 1911)

Since that day the Eucharist became the great love of her life; she will never do without it, just as from an early she learned to venerate the Blessed Mother and to pray the Rosary every day.

She acquired a good religious and literary culture, learned the most important European languages, was a discreet painter, and loved music and equestrian sports. Despite family bereavements, her life passed quietly until 1857, when Maria Clotilde was 15. Her father, King Vittorio Emanuele II, received from Prince Jerome Bonaparte, cousin of Emperor Napoleon III of France, a request to marry her.

At that point, the request turned into political imposition by the Italian Prime Minister, Camillo Benso di Cavour, who was negotiating in Plombières in 1858 an intervention by the French on the side of Piedmont against Austria.

Photograph of Victor Emmanuel II of Italy.

Her father, Vittorio Emanuele, opposed his 15-year old daughter’s marriage to a prince in his forties and a famous libertine, but was soon forced to yield for “reasons of state”. Clotilde accepted to wed as a sacrificial victim, and on 30 January 1859, she married Jerome Bonaparte in the cathedral of Turin.

On 3 February, the couple made a solemn entrance to Paris, welcomed by the entire court and by Emperor Napoleon III and Empress Eugenie.

However, her difficulties began quite soon, as her Christian principles clashed with those of her husband, profoundly influenced by the writings of Voltaire. He would spend whole days without seeing her, and Maria Clotilde was forced to write in order to communicate with him.

Photograph of Princess Ludovica Teresa Maria Clotilde and her husband Prince Napoléon Joseph Charles Paul Bonaparte.

In 1861, in order to please him, she accompanied him to the U.S. and in 1863 to Egypt and the Holy Land, where she was able to pray at length and with great emotion on the holy sites of Jesus, especially on Calvary, as she was a great devotee of the Crucifix.

While avoiding hurting the feelings of her husband Jerome, a rationalist and an enemy of religion, she managed to have a chapel in the palace with the celebration of daily Mass.

The marriage produced three children, Vittorio Napoleon (1862), Louis Napoleon (1864) and Maria Letizia (1866); they became her greatest joy and she raised them in the light of Christ.

PrinceNapoléon Bonaparte with his two sons.

While in the pomp of the imperial court in Paris, Maria Clotilde kept a spirit of compassion and detachment, dedicating herself to the poor and the sick in hospitals, whom she visited every day.

Even in parties in which she was forced to participate she dressed with simplicity and was very reserved; her style, gentleness and religiosity imposed themselves at court to the point that Ernest Renan, an infidel and enemy of Christ, said: “Clotilde is a saint of the race of St. Louis of France.” Emperor Napoleon III, whom she affectionately called ‘Dad’, esteemed her deeply and deemed her “a most affectionate daughter.”

On 2 September 1870, as the Prussians defeated the French army at Sedan, the Napoleonic dynasty was dethroned and misadventures began also for Clotilde’s family; but she faced them with a strong and courageous heart.

And their daughter, Maria Letizia Bonaparte, Duchess of Aosta.

In August 1870, even her father, Vittorio Emanuele II advised her to return to Turin, but she declined responding that the good of her husband, children, and France, would not allow it.

However, as the Prussians invaded Paris, on 5 September she had to depart and became the last person to leave the city. She did so with the dignity of a queen and not as a fugitive, and sought refuge in the castle of Prangins on Lake Geneva, Switzerland.

There her inner spirituality manifested itself even more and, still in her thirties, she offered herself to God as a victim: “From now on, my life will be a complete immolation of body, heart, feelings and everything for Thy love, o Jesus … I will be happy to be Thy victim, o my Jesus, if Thou be so pleased.”

Her husband, Jerome Bonaparte, left her alone in Prangins and returned to Paris, with an eye to recover his throne and have fun; he ignored his family.

Maria Clotilde suffered greatly because of that, a situation exacerbated by the lack of attending Mass and receiving Communion. Only on Sundays could she travel to Nyon, a neighboring city, to attend Mass. There she met Dominican Father Hyacinth Cormier (1832-1916), today a Blessed, who became her new spiritual director. That meeting gave rise to her joining the Dominican Third Order under the name ‘Sister Catherine of the Sacred Heart’, while remaining in the world and devoted to her family.

After much prayer and taking counsel with Father Cormier, she finally decided to separate amicably from her husband, with whom she remained on good terms, so much so that in 1891 she went to Rome, where he was dying, to comfort him and have the consolation of seeing him die as a Christian.
In 1878, she left Switzerland and returned to the castle of her ancestors in Moncalieri, Italy, where she spent the rest of her life.

She lived as a nun in the world, with daily Mass and Communion, saying the whole Rosary to Our Lady, and showing extreme love and charity for children, the poor, the sick, mothers of families, and helping priests, always present at every charitable initiative.
While still living, she was already called “the saint of Moncalieri.” She backed and supported nascent works of many great saints from Turin at the time such as Don Bosco, Don Murialdo, Don Cottolengo, canons Luigi and Giovanni Boccardo, etc. She personally gave catechism classes at her home in Moncalieri, preparing children for the First Communion.

A faithful daughter of the Church, she wrote the King her father a strong note of protest when she learned that laws suppressing religious orders, approved in Piedmont in 1854, would be applied to the whole new Kingdom of Italy. Without fearing the widespread Freemasonry, she wrote, “The last day will come for all, and then things will be seen clearly. Dad, do not prepare painful and terrible remorse for yourself.”

She became a true mystic who lived off Jesus in silence and recollection while making Him known to all. When her brother, King Umberto I, was assassinated in Monza on 29 July 1900, the Crown Prince, Vittorio Emanuele III asked Aunt Clotilde for prayers and help.

She died in Moncalieri, aged 68, on 25 June 1911, and after a solemn funeral at Turin’s “Great Mother of God” Church she was buried in the Basilica of Superga.

A model for both the powerful and humble, the cause for her beatification was introduced on 10 July 1942.

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St. Maximus of Turin

St. Maximus of Turin preaching to the people.

Bishop and theological writer, b. probably in Rhaetia, about 380; d. shortly after 465. Only two dates are historically established in his life. In 451 he was at the synod of Milan where the bishops of Northern Italy accepted the celebrated letter (epistola dogmatica) of Leo I, setting forth the orthodox doctrine of the Incarnation against the Nestorians and Eutychians (Mansi, “SS. Conc. Coll. Ampl.”, VI, 143). Among nineteen subscribers Maximus is the eighth, and since the order was determined by age, Maximus must then have been about seventy years old. The second established date is 465, when he was at the Synod of Rome. (Mansi, VII, 959, 965 sq.) Here the subscription of Maximus follows immediately after the pope’s, showing he was the oldest of the forty-eight bishops present. The approximate time and place of his birth may be surmised from a passage in Sermo 81 (P.L., LVII, 695), where he designates himself as a witness of the martyrdom of three missionary priests in 397 at Anaunia in the Rhaetian Alps. History does not mention him after 465. He is the first known bishop of Turin, then a suffragan see of Milan. His successor was St. Victor. His name is in the Roman martyrology on 25 June, and the city of Turin honours him as its patron. A life which, however, is entirely unreliable, was written after the eleventh century, and is printed in “Acta SS.”, June, VII, 3rd ed., 44-46. It states that a cleric one day followed him with an evil intention to a retired chapel, where the saint was wont to pray. The cleric suddenly became so thirsty that he implored Maximus for help. A roe happened to pass which the saint caused to stop, so that the cleric could partake of its milk. This legend accounts for the fact that St. Maximus is represented in art as pointing at a roe.

St. Maximus presents to the people of Turin the Icon of the Madonna Consolata.

He is the author of numerous discourses, first edited by Bruni, and published by order of Pius VI at the Propaganda in 1784 (reprinted in P.L., LVII). These discourses, delivered to the people by the saint, consist of one hundred and eighteen homilies, one hundred and sixteen sermons, and six treatises (tractatus). Homilies 1-63 are de tempore, i.e. on the seasons of the ecclesiastical year and on the feasts of Our Lord; 64-82, de sanctis, i.e. on the saints whose feast was commemorated on the day on which they were delivered; 83-118, de diversis, i.e. exegetical, dogmatical or moral. Sermons 1-55 are de tempore; 56-93, de sanctis; 93-116, de diversis. Three of the treatises are on baptism, one against the Pagans, and one against the Jews. The last two are extant only in fragments, and their genuineness is doubtful. The sixth treatise, whose genuineness is also doubtful, contains short discourses on twenty-three topics taken from the Four Gospels. An appendix contains writings of uncertain authorship; thirty-one sermons, three homilies, and two long epistles addressed to a sick friend. Many writings, however, which Bruni ascribes to Maximus are of doubtful origin. The discourses are usually very brief, and couched in forcible, though at times over flowery language. Among the many facts of liturgy and history touched on in the discourses are: abstinence during Lent (hom. 44), no fasting or kneeling at prayers during paschal time (hom. 61), fasting on the Vigil of Pentecost (hom. 62), the synod of Milan in 389 at which Jovinianus was condemned (hom. 9), the impending barbarian invasion (hom. 86-92), the destruction of the Church of Milan by the barbarians (hom. 94), various pagan superstitions still prevalent at his time (hom. 16, 100-02), the supremacy of St. Peter (hom. 54, 70, 72, serm. 114). All his discourses manifest his solicitude for the eternal welfare of his flock, and in many he fearlessly rebukes the survivals of paganism and defends the orthodox faith against the inroads of heresy.

Ferreri, S. Massimo, vescovo di Torino e i suoi tempi (3rd ed., Turin, 1868); Savio, Gli antichi vescovi d’Italia (Turin, 1899), 283-294; Fessler-Jungmann, Institutiones Patrologiae, II (Innsbruck, 1892), ii, 256-76; Argles in Dict. Christ. Biog., s. v. Maximus (I6); Bardenhewer, Patrology, tr. Shahan (St. Louis, 1908), 527-8.

MICHAEL OTT (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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(Or WILLIAM OF MONTE VERGINE.)

Saint William of Vercelli's statue at St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican. 1878

Statue of Saint William of Vercelli at St. Peter’s Basilica, Vatican.

The founder of the Hermits of Monte Vergine, or Williamites, born 1085; died 25 June, 1142. He was the son of noble parents, both of whom died when he was still a child, and his education was entrusted to one of his kinsmen. At the age of fifteen he made up his mind to renounce the world and lead a life of penance. With this end in view, he went on a pilgrimage to St. James of Compostella, and, not content with the ordinary hardships of such a pilgrimage, he encircled his body with iron bands to increase his suffering. After this journey he started on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, but it was revealed to him that he would be of greater service to God if he remained in Italy. He built himself a hut on Monte Vergine, wishing to become a hermit and live in solitude, but it was not long before many people flocked to him to put themselves under his guidance, being attracted by the sanctity of his life and the many miracles which he performed. Soon a monastery was built, and by 1119 the Congregation of Monte Vergine (q.v.) was founded. St. William lived at Monte Vergine until the brethren began to murmur against him, saying that the life was too austere, that he gave too much in alms, and so on. He therefore decided to leave Monte Vergine and thus take away from the monks the cause of their grievances. Roger I of Naples took him under his patronage, and the saint founded many monasteries, both of men and of women, in that kingdom. So edified was the king with the saint’s sanctity of life and the wisdom of his counsels that, in order to have him always near him, he built a monastery opposite his palace at Salerno. Knowing by special revelation that his end was at hand, William retired to his monastery of Gugieto, where he died, and was buried in the church.

Acta SS., V June, 112; VI June, 259; RENDA, Vita. . .S. Gulielmi (Naples, 1591).

Paul Brookfield (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Simon de Montfort

An Earl of Leicester, date of birth unknown, died at Toulouse, 25 June, 1218. Simon (IV) de Montfort was descended from the lords of Montfort l’Amaury in Normandy, being the second son of Simon (III), and Amicia, daughter of Robert de Beaumont, third Earl of Leicester. Having succeeded his father as Baron de Montfort in 1181, in 1190 he married Alice de Montmorency, the daughter of Bouchard (III) de Montmorency. In 1199 while taking part in a tournament at Ecry-sur-Aisne in the province of Champagne he heard Fulk de Neuilly preaching the crusade, and in company with Count Thibaud de Champagne and many other nobles and knights he took the cross. Unfortunately, the crusade got out of control, and the French knights, instead of co-operating with the pope, decided on a campaign in Egypt, and on their arrival at Venice entered on…

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St. Anthelm of Belley

(1107 – 1178) Prior of the Carthusian Grand Chartreuse and bishop of Belley.

He was born near Chambéry in 1107. He would later receive an ecclesiastical benefice in the area of Belley. When he was thirty years old, he resigned from this position to become a Carthusian monk at Portes. Only two years after joining the order, he was made the prior of the Grande Chartreuse, the motherhouse of his order, which had recently incurred substantial damage.

He was an effective administrator there. While under his…

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Pope St. Silverius

(Reigned 536-37).

Dates of birth and death unknown. He was the son of Pope [St.] Hormisdas who had been married before becoming one of the higher clergy. Silverius entered the service of the Church and was subdeacon at Rome when Pope Agapetus died at Constantinople, 22 April, 536. The Empress Theodora, who favoured the Monophysites sought to bring about the election as pope of the Roman deacon Vigilius who was then at Constantinople and had given her the desired guarantees as to the Monophysites. However, Theodatus, King of the Ostrogoths, who wished to prevent the election of a pope connected with Constantinople, forestalled her, and by his influence the subdeacon Silverius was chosen. The election of a subdeacon as Bishop of Rome was unusual. Consequently, it is easy to understand that, as the author of the first part of the life of Silverius in…

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St. Aloysius Gonzaga

When we see a young prince, the darling of his family and country, sacrifice nobility, sovereignty, riches, and pleasures, the more easily to secure the treasure of divine love, and of eternal happiness, how ought we to condemn our own sloth, who live as if heaven were to cost us nothing!

When we see a young prince, the darling of his family and country, sacrifice nobility, sovereignty, riches, and pleasures, the more easily to secure the treasure of divine love, and of eternal happiness, how ought we to condemn our own sloth, who live as if heaven were to cost us nothing!

Aloysius Gonzaga was son of Ferdinand Gonzaga, prince of the holy empire, and marquis of Castiglione, removed in the third degree of kindred from the duke of Mantua. His mother was Martha Tana Santena, daughter of Tanus Santena, lord of Cherry, in Piedmont. She was lady of honor to Isabel, the wife of Philip II of Spain, in whose court the marquis Gonzaga also lived in great favor. When she understood this nobleman had asked her in marriage both of the king and queen, and of her friends in Italy, being a lady of remarkable piety, she spent her time in fasting and prayer in order to learn the will of heaven, and to draw down upon herself the divine blessing. The marriage was solemnized in the most…

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St. Thomas More

Saint, knight, Lord Chancellor of England, author and martyr, born in London, 7 February, 1477-78; executed at Tower Hill, 6 July, 1535.

He was the sole surviving son of Sir John More, barrister and later judge, by his first wife Agnes, daughter of Thomas Graunger. While still a child Thomas was sent to St. Anthony’s School in Threadneedle Street, kept by Nicholas Holt, and when thirteen years old was placed in the household of Cardinal Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Lord Chancellor. Here his merry character and brilliant intellect attracted the notice of the archbishop, who sent him to Oxford, where he entered at Canterbury Hall (subsequently absorbed by Christ Church) about 1492. His father made him an allowance barely sufficient to supply the necessaries of life and, in consequence, he…

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St. Paulinus, Bishop of Nola

(Pontius Meropius Anicius Paulinus.)

Born at Bordeaux about 354; died 22 June, 431. He sprang from a distinguished family of Aquitania and his education was entrusted to the poet Ausonius. He became governor of the Province of Campania, but he soon realized that he could not find in public life the happiness he sought. From 380 to 390 he lived almost entirely in his native land. He married a Spanish lady, a Christian named Therasia. To her, to Bishop Delphinus of Bordeaux and his successor the Presbyter Amandus, and to St. Martin of Tours, who had cured him of some disease of the eye, he owed his conversion. He and his brother were baptized at the same time by Delphinus. When Paulinus lost his only child eight days a…

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St. John Fisher

Cardinal, Bishop of Rochester, and martyr; born at Beverley, Yorkshire, England, 1459 (?1469); died 22 June, 1535. John was the eldest son of Robert Fisher, merchant of Beverley, and Agnes his wife. His early education was probably received in the school attached to the collegiate church in his native town, whence in 1484 he removed to Michaelhouse, Cambridge. He took the degree of B.A. in 1487, proceeded M.A. in 1491, in which year he was elected a fellow of his college, and was made Vicar of Northallerton, Yorkshire. In 1494 he resigned his benefice to become proctor of his university, and three years later was appointed Master of Michaelhouse, about which date he became chaplain and confessor to Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond and Derby, mother of King Henry VII. In 1501 he received the degree of D.D., and was elected Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge University. Under Fisher’s guidance, the Lady Margaret founded St. John’s and Christ’s Colleges at Cambridge, and also the two “Lady Margaret” professorships of divinity at Oxford and Cambridge respectively…

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Following The Stars To Santiago – Part II

June 15, 2017

Following The Stars To Santiago – Part I There were times when a pilgrimage to Santiago was a dangerous undertaking. Thieves, murderers, and highwaymen assaulted defenseless pilgrims. To ensure the pilgrims’ safety, the Church fostered several groups, including many orders of chivalry.  The Knights of Santiago, the Knights Templars, the Knights of Saint John of […]

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It Takes More Heroism To Be Faithful Today Than In The Days Of Chivalry

June 15, 2017

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira There is more heroism in maintaining the elevation of soul in this pigsty that is the contemporary world, and to face the temptations, manifestations of annoyance, and perhaps laughter or mockery that you all face, than in riding a horse in shining armor, resplendent with glory.   (Excerpt from a […]

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June 16 – Pope Innocent III

June 15, 2017

(Lotario de’ Conti) One of the greatest popes of the Middle Ages, son of Count Trasimund of Segni and nephew of Clement III, born 1160 or 1161 at Anagni, and died 16 June, 1216, at Perugia. He received his early education at Rome, studied theology at Paris, jurisprudence at Bologna, and became a learned theologian […]

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June 16 – Death threats meant nothing to him

June 15, 2017

Saint John Francis Regis Born 31 January, 1597, in the village of Fontcouverte (department of Aude); died at la Louvesc, 30 Dec., 1640. His father Jean, a rich merchant, had been recently ennobled in recognition of the prominent part he had taken in the Wars of the League; his mother, Marguerite de Cugunhan, belonged by […]

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June 17 – Sobieski

June 15, 2017

John III Sobieski (Polish: Jan III Sobieski, Lithuanian: Jonas Sobieskis; 17 August 1629 – 17 June 1696) Born at Olesko in 1629; died at Wilanow, 1696; son of James, Castellan of Cracow and descended by his mother from the heroic Zolkiewski, who died in battle at Cecora. His elder brother Mark was his companion in […]

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June 17 – Founder of the Albertines

June 15, 2017

Saint Brother Albert Chmielowski In Igołomia, on the outskirts of Cracow (Poland), the noble family of Adalbert Chmielowski and Josephine Borzysławska announced on August 20, 1845, the birth of their son Adam (Brother Albert). Mr Chmielowski together with his wife, raised their children in an atmosphere of patriotic ideals, strong faith in God and a […]

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June 17, 1793: Pius VI condemns the revolutionary concepts of liberty and equality

June 15, 2017

Pius VI repeatedly condemned the false concept of liberty and equality. In the Secret Consistory of June 17, 1793, quoting the words of the encyclical Inscrutabilie Divinae Sapientiae of December 25, 1775, he declared: “‘The most perfidious philosophers go farther. They dissolve all those bonds by which human beings are joined to one another and to […]

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June 18 – To make peace, she surrendered her son’s rights to the throne

June 15, 2017

Blessed Theresa of Portugal (born at Coimbra, October 4, 1178 – died at Lorvão, June 18, 1250) Queen of Léon as the first wife of King Alfonso IX of León. She was the oldest daughter of Sancho I of Portugal and Dulce of Aragon. Theresa was the mother to three of Alfonso’s children—two daughters and […]

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June 19 – Herbert Vaughan

June 15, 2017

Herbert Vaughan Cardinal, and third Archbishop of Westminster; b. at Gloucester, 15 April, 1832; d. at St. Joseph’s College, Mill Hill, Middlesex, 19 June, 1903; he came of a family which had been true to the Catholic Faith all through the ages of the persecution. Its members had suffered for their faith in fines and […]

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June 19 – St. Jean-Louis Bonnard

June 15, 2017

Saint Jean-Louis Bonnard A French missionary and martyr, born 1 March, 1824 at Saint-Christôt-en-Jarret (Diocese of Lyons); beheaded 30 April, 1852. After a collegiate course at Saint Jodard, he entered the seminary of Lyons, which he left at the age of twenty two, to complete his theological studies at the Seminary of the Foreign Missions […]

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June 19 – Bl. Odo of Cambrai

June 15, 2017

Bl. Odo of Cambrai Bishop and confessor, also called ODOARDUS; born at Orleans, 1050; died at Anchin, 19 June, 1113. In 1087 he was invited by the canons of Tournai to teach in that city, and there soon won a great reputation. He became a Benedictine monk (1095) in St. Martin’s, Tournai, of which be […]

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June 19 – St. François-Isidore Gagelin

June 15, 2017

Saint François-Isidore Gagelin (10 May 1799 – 17 October 1833) was a French missionary of the Paris Foreign Missions Society in Vietnam. He became the first French martyr of the 19th century in Vietnam. He was born in Montperreux, Doubs. He left for Vietnam in 1821. In 1826, when Emperor Minh Mạng ordered all missionaries […]

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June 19 – Love Accepts No Limitations

June 15, 2017

St. Juliana Falconieri Born in 1270; died 12 June, 1341. Juliana belonged to the noble Florentine family of Falconieri. Her uncle, St. Alexis Falconieri, was one of the seven founders of the Servite Order. Through his influence she also consecrated herself from her earliest youth to the religious life and the practices of Christian perfection. […]

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June 19 – Execution of second group of those who believed in the religious exemption, but only at first

June 15, 2017

Carthusian Martyrs – the Second Group After little more than a month after the first group, it was the turn of three leading monks of the London house: Doms Humphrey Middlemore, William Exmew and Sebastian Newdigate, who were to die at Tyburn, London on the 19 June. Newdigate was a personal friend of Henry VIII, […]

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June 13 – He Lived Only 36 Years, But the Whole World Knows Him

June 12, 2017

St. Anthony of Padua Franciscan Thaumaturgist, born at Lisbon, 1195; died at Vercelli, 13 June, 1231. He received in baptism the name of Ferdinand. Later writers of the fifteenth century asserted that his father was Martin Bouillon, descendant of the renowned Godfrey de Bouillon, commander of the First Crusade, and his mother, Theresa Taveira, descendant […]

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June 14 – The entire population was slaughtered, except those who embraced Islam

June 12, 2017

Croia A titular see of Albania. Croia (pronounced Kruya, Albanian, “Spring”) stands on the site of Eriboea, a town mentioned by Ptolemy (III, xiii, 13, 41). Georgius Acropolites (lxix) mentions it as a fortress in 1251. A decree of the Venetian senate gave it in 1343 to Marco Barbarigo and his wife. In 1395 it […]

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June 15 – Magna Carta

June 12, 2017

Magna Carta The charter of liberties granted by King John of England in 1215 and confirmed with modifications by Henry III in 1216, 1217, and 1225. The Magna Carta has long been considered by the English-speaking peoples as the earliest of the great constitutional documents which give the history of England so unique a character; […]

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June 15 – The Northern Crusades

June 12, 2017

The Battle of Lyndanisse was a battle which helped King Valdemar II of Denmark establish the territory of Danish Estonia during the Northern Crusades. Valdemar II defeated the Estonians at Lyndanisse (Estonian: Lindanise), during the Northern Crusades, by orders from the Pope… Read more here.

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June 15 – St. Bernard dogs carry his name

June 12, 2017

St. Bernard of Menthon Born in 923, probably in the castle Menthon near Annecy, in Savoy; died at Novara, 1008. He was descended from a rich, noble family and received a thorough education. He refused to enter an honorable marriage proposed by his father and decided to devote himself to the service of the Church. […]

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Remember what Queen Elizabeth said at her Coronation 64 Years Ago

June 8, 2017

According to People: Prince Charles…was thus allowed to attend the festivities, making him the first heir apparent of a Queen to attend a coronation. …the Queen said… “The ceremonies you have seen today are ancient, and some of their origins are veiled in the mists of the past… But their spirit and their meaning shine […]

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Grandson shows Churchill’s house to Prince of Wales

June 8, 2017

According to The Telegraph: The Prince was shown around Chartwell by Sir Nicholas Soames, the grandson of Sir Winston who grew up there and has fond memories of his family in situ. Later this year, Sir Winston’s bedroom will be part of the tour for the first time… Although the house has been open to […]

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Following The Stars To Santiago

June 8, 2017

By Julian Martins In the eleventh century, a poor, tired, and thirsty pilgrim crossed one of the most difficult mountain passes in Navarre, Spain. He was headed for the faraway lands of Galicia, to the shrine of Saint James the Greater, where the remains of this great saint had been miraculously discovered two centuries earlier. […]

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We need a chivalry of the spirit to combat the Revolution in the Reign of Mary

June 8, 2017

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira This would be the chivalry of that time: a chivalry that would be much more one of the spirit than one of brute force. It would be a chivalry of a spiritual nature which, if it remained faithful, would make it impossible to happen to it what happened to the […]

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June 9 – St. Columba

June 8, 2017

St. Columba Abbot of Iona, born at Garten, County Donegal, Ireland, 7 December, 521; died 9 June, 597. He belonged to the Clan O’Donnell, and was of royal descent. His father’s name was Fedhlimdh and that of his mother Eithne. On his father’s side he was great-great-grandson of Niall of the Nine Hostages, an Irish […]

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June 9 – A simple palace servant, God confided to her the destiny of nations

June 8, 2017

Blessed Anna Maria Gesualda Antonia Taigi (Maiden name Giannetti.) Venerable Servant of God, born at Siena, Italy, 29 May, 1769; died at Rome, 9 June, 1837. Her parents, Luigi Giannetti and Maria Masi, kept an apothecary shop at Siena, but lost all their fortune and were obliged to go to Rome in search of a […]

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June 9 – Apostle of Brazil

June 8, 2017

St. Joseph Anchieta A famous Jesuit missionary, commonly known as the Apostle of Brazil, born on the Island of Tenerife, in 1553, of noble family; died in Brazil, 1596. After studying in Coimbra, he entered the Society of Jesus, at the age of seventeen, and when a novice nearly ruined his health by his excessive […]

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June 10 – Anti-pagan Renaissance Saint

June 8, 2017

Bl. Giovanni Dominici (BANCHINI or BACCHINI was his family name). Cardinal, statesman and writer, born at Florence, 1356; died at Buda, 10 July, 1420. He entered the Dominican Order at Santa Maria Novella in 1372 after having been cured, through the intercession of St. Catherine of Siena, of an impediment of speech for which he […]

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June 10 – Most Sublime Figure of Portuguese Literature

June 8, 2017

Luis Vaz de Camões (OR CAMOENS) Born in 1524 or 1525; died 10 June, 1580. The most sublime figure in the history of Portuguese literature, Camões owes his lasting fame to his epic poem “Os Lusiadas,” (The Lusiads); he is remarkable also for the degree of art attained in his lyrics, less noteworthy for his […]

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June 11 – Blessed Ignatius Maloyan

June 8, 2017

Ignatius Maloyan (Shoukrallah), son of Melkon and Faridé, was born in 1869, in Mardin, Turkey. His parish priest, noticed in him signs of a priestly vocation, so he sent him to the convent of Bzommar-Lebanon; he was fourteen years old. After finishing his superior studies in 1896, the day dedicated to the Sacred Heart of […]

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June 11 – St. Godeberta

June 8, 2017

St. Godeberta Born about the year 640, at Boves, a few leagues from Amiens, in France; died about the beginning of the eighth century, at Noyon (Oise), the ancient Noviomagus. She was very carefully educated, her parents being of noble rank and attached to the court of King Clovis II. When the question of her […]

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June 12 – Saint Guido of Acqui

June 8, 2017

Saint Guido of Acqui (also Wido) (c. 1004 – 12 June 1070) was Bishop of Acqui (now Acqui Terme) in north-west Italy from 1034 until his death. He was born around 1004 to a noble family of the area of Acqui, the Counts of Acquesana, in Melazzo where the family’s wealth was concentrated. He completed […]

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June 12 – A certain nobleman had a concubine

June 8, 2017

St. John of Sahagun Hermit, born 1419, at Sahagun (or San Fagondez) in the Kingdom of Leon, in Spain; died 11 June, 1479, at Salamanca; feast 12 June. In art he is represented holding a chalice and host surrounded by rays of light. John, the oldest of seven children, was born of pious and respected […]

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June 12 – He Crowned Charlemagne

June 8, 2017

Pope St. Leo III Date of birth unknown; died 816. He was elected on the very day his predecessor was buried (26 Dec., 795), and consecrated on the following day. It is quite possible that this haste may have been due to a desire on the part of the Romans to anticipate any interference of […]

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June 6 – St. Claudius

June 5, 2017

The Life of St. Claudius, Abbot of Condat, has been the subject of much controversy. Dom Benott says that he lived in the seventh century; that he had been Bishop of Besançon before being abbot, that he was fifty-five years an abbot, and died in 694. He left Condat in a very flourishing state to […]

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June 6 – Patron and Protector of Bohemia

June 5, 2017

St. Norbert Born at Xanten on the left bank of the Rhine, near Wesel, c. 1080; died at Magdeburg, 6 June, 1134. His father, Heribert, Count of Gennep, was related to the imperial house of Germany, and his house of Lorraine. A stately bearing, a penetrating intellect, a tender, earnest heart, marked the future apostle. […]

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June 7 – Martyr Prince of the Wends

June 5, 2017

St. Gottschalk (GODESCALCUS). Martyr, Prince of the Wends; died at Lenzen on the Elbe, 7 June 1066. His feast is noted for 7 June in the additions of the Carthusians at Brussels to the martyrology of Usuardus. He was the son of Udo, Prince of the Abrodites who remained a Christian, though a poor one […]

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June 7 – The Crusaders reach the walls of Jerusalem

June 5, 2017

In June of 1099 [the First Crusade] arrived before the walls of Jerusalem, which was then held by the Fatimid Arabs of Egypt. With their usual religious zeal and grim determination, the Christians prepared to attack the walls. Their fighting force had been reduced to 1,200 knights and 10,000 foot soldiers, with a similar number […]

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June 8 – She did what St. Ignatius could not

June 5, 2017

Ven. Anne de Xainctonge Foundress of the Society of the Sisters of St. Ursula of the Blessed Virgin, born at Dijon, 21 November, 1567; died at Dôle, 8 June, 1621. She was the daughter of Jean de Xainctonge, councillor in the Dijon Parliament, and of Lady Marguerite Collard, both of noble birth and virtuous life. […]

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June 8 – Accused of theft and other misconduct

June 5, 2017

St. William of York (WILLIAM FITZHERBERT, also called WILLIAM OF THWAYT). Archbishop of York. Tradition represents him as nephew of King Stephen, whose sister Emma was believed to have married Herbert of Winchester, treasurer to Henry I. William became a priest, and about 1130 he was canon and treasurer of York. In 1142 he was […]

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June 8 – The Noble Countess Who Dedicated Her Life to Bringing Dissolute Women to Repentance

June 5, 2017

Blessed Mary of the Divine Heart (died in Porto, Portugal, June 8, 1899), born Maria Droste zu Vischering, was a noble of Germany and Roman Catholic nun best known for influencing Pope Leo XIII’s consecration of the world to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Pope Leo XIII called this consecration “the greatest act of my […]

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