About seventy-five years ago, the grand master of the Teutonic Order, Archduke Maximilian of Austria, lived in the castle of Ebenqweir near the beautiful Gmunden Lake. He had in his service a young shepherdess named Josephine. She made her home in a small room in the barn where she kept her flock.

It happened that one morning Josephine was absent from her usual routine of chores, and the other shepherds, seeking her, found her in bed feeling very ill.

The next day, a great reception took place at the castle. The Archduke hosted a dinner to which the castle chaplain, a Redemptorist father, had been invited. In the course of the conversation, the sick young shepherdess was mentioned.

“Well! I shall take the Blessed Sacrament to her tomorrow,” said the chaplain.

“No, no,” interjected the prince. “It would be necessary to pass through the whole barn to reach her room. The barn is not the proper place for the Blessed Sacrament. It is better to bring her here to the castle.”

“Your Highness, I had thought of asking you this favor, but the doctor is adamant against it. He is certain she will die if we move her.”

The prince reflected for a moment before replying. “Well then, if Our Lord is to cross the barn He shall not go alone; I shall accompany Him. We shall give Him an escort such as will compensate for the poverty of the place.”

The officials among whom these words were spoken exchanged surprised glances ─ not all of them professed the same degree of simple and humble faith as their master. At last, summoning up his courage, the court marshal ventured a few remarks regarding etiquette and convenience.

“My dear marshal,” rejoined the archduke, “if the Master of Heaven and earth does not find it beneath His dignity to cross a barn to visit a little shepherdess, I certainly will not be dishonored for keeping Him company. As to my court officials, be well assured they will lose nothing of their dignity in following my example.”

Turning again to the chaplain, he asked, “At what time, Father, do you intend to take the Blessed Sacrament to her?”

“At seven o’clock, Your Highness.”

“Fine. I shall be at the chapel at that hour. And you, Gentlemen, be at the door at five minutes to seven to escort the Blessed Sacrament. Let everyone be present…and in gala dress. Everyone shall carry a lighted candle.”

His voice had been brisk and chivalrous, yet the undertone was resolute, like his tone when addressing his troops. It was an order, which it was their duty to obey. As the court officials retired, the archduke settled the last details of the morning ceremony with his marshal. He issued orders for the barn to be decorated with the most beautiful plants from the greenhouse.

Next morning at the appointed hour, the chaplain left the chapel with the Blessed Sacrament. The archduke followed. His love of utter simplicity notwithstanding, this morning he regaled in the full uniform of his grand-mastership of the Teutonic Order and decorated with medals. Every one of his officials followed him in great gala dress, each carrying a lighted candle.

The procession wended its way through the palace gardens. As the ringing of the bells announced the passing of the Blessed Sacrament, workers paused from their labors to gaze in awe at the impressive cortege.

In the sick room, an altar was prepared. As the priest opened the ciborium, raised the Host and recited the Domine non sum dignus, the archduke knelt on the straw, and all his officials did likewise. Yesterday’s hesitation was gone; the example set by the prince had inflamed the coldest hearts.

Before leaving, the archduke offered words of consolation to the sick girl. Soon afterwards, the procession returned to the chapel.

The peasants witnessing the passage of this magnificent procession were moved to tears, and all commented among themselves, “may God preserve our good Archduke Maximilian and may he remain with us for many years!”

From Der Heiligen Sakraments Verkünder

Taken from Tradition, Family and Property Magazine, Septemeber-October, 1994.

Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 610

 

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“The temporal order is a creature of God that gives the Creator more glory than the moon and the stars.

The Church certainly has the proper means to promote the salvation of souls, but society and the State have instrumental means to achieve the same end.”

Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

We deem it useful to analyze some aspects of one of the fundamental theses of Catholic doctrine regarding the problem of the relationship between the spiritual order and the temporal order, which is the latter’s “ministeriality” in relation to the former.[1]

It seems to us that today’s environment instills such a materialistic and purely economic conception of temporal life, that it exerts a sensible influence on the psychological makeup, mental habits, and ideological tendencies of people who, at least in theory, are assumed to be faithful, in their broad lines, to Catholic and even Thomistic thought. Such persons would have less difficulty in accepting the Church’s position on the ministeriality of the temporal sphere if they remembered exactly the whole human [material and spiritual] content of the temporal sphere.

For explainable reasons, excellent writers have unintentionally contributed to keep this content from clearly appearing to everyone’s eyes.

An omitted truth: Human society must satisfy not only bodily needs but also those of the soul

Other authors uphold the doctrine that human society does not exist as a consequence of some arbitrary pact established by a number of men in ages that are lost in the night of time, but is a spontaneous, legitimate and ineluctable consequence of the natural order itself. They carefully and painstakingly set forth the arguments for their thesis by the observation of everyday life: the need for specialization and collaboration to ensure material subsistence and progress; the need for an authority to direct that collaboration etc. It is therefore a natural necessity [and not just contractual, for there to exist] a society with all its essential characteristics.

Established on this basis [the observation of everyday life], the demonstration, besides being irreproachable is highly didactic because it deals with clear, simple and palpable facts that fall within the scope of the direct and personal observation of any reader. [There are, however, other arguments to be considered].

One understands that an author, pressed by the obsession to summarize imposed by today’s hustle and bustle, can quickly go over other arguments or even silence about them. This is what often happens with the argument that man is social by the very nature of his soul, abstracting from any of his bodily needs. Many books of all kinds, shapes and sizes which make the main lines of Natural Law available to the public, fail to explore this argument in all its wealth.

This fact produces an important consequence in the readers’ mentality. A great number of scholars are accustomed to seeing human society as something that exists only, or at least mainly, to meet the physical needs of man.

This conviction does not stem from an express statement by this or that treatise writer; rather, it is formed in people’s subconscious like a general impression which, if not logical, is at least explicable. For if the more insistently mentioned and more widely developed arguments are based on material, economic and practical needs, it is not surprising that the notion will arise that society exists above all to meet such needs, and that little by little, the ends of society relative to the human soul move from the background to complete oblivion.

As we said, the contemporary atmosphere is such as to powerfully favor this phenomenon. We live in an ambience saturated with materialism, in which we hear at all times opinions that would only be true … witness actions that would only be legitimate … are put in the presence of institutions and customs that would only be reasonable … if the human soul did not exist. Materialism is immanent and implied in almost everything that goes on around us.

It is not surprising, therefore, that this or that Catholic person who has honestly studied the general lines of moral philosophy and read in St. Thomas (De Regimine Principum, Chapter I) that temporal society exists in order to remedy not only man’s physical but also intellectual insufficiency to live alone – will very often take before the political, social and economic problems with which he is confronted, a practical attitude that differs little from the position of a materialist or agnostic person.

Tragic consequences of forgetting the supremacy of the soul over the body

Since man is constituted by two distinct principles, body and soul, it is clear that in everything that concerns him the soul will be much more important than the body; for what is spiritual and imperishable is worth more than what is material and mortal.

Any sociology that proceeds from this truth must give the best of its solicitude and attention to what concerns the human soul, its balance, well-being, and development. However interesting and respectable material problems may be, however much talent, diligence and vigor must be employed in solving them, this fundamental truth must never be forgotten.

Obviously, it is not a question of devoting to material life less than it deserves, since man is man and not a pure angelic spirit. But one must not break the hierarchy of values even when one largely gives matter its due. We cannot conceive material problems by dissociating them from the full and total human reality, that is, that we also have a soul, and that it is worth incomparably more than our body.

The modern world has ignored these principles, elevated the body to the status of an idol, and denied the primacy of the soul, if not its very existence. It organized everything as if man had only a body.

The result is right before us: neuroses, psychoses, monstrous sexual perversions, existentialism, and the great cacophonic confusion of our day. The book by Alexis Carrel [L’homme, cet inconnu-Man, this Unknown] — about which there would be many reservations to make — is already becoming old but can be an advantageous read to those wishing to know the cost man is paying for this underestimation or negation of the soul in our century’s technological and material progress.

It is thus a question — and many are recognizing it – of restoring the primacy of the spiritual.

But in order for this intention not to remain only in the world of sound assertions but become a palpable action with defined ends it is necessary to investigate exactly what is the role played by spiritual matters in the life that man leads in society.

The society of men must be mirrored in the angelic society

Considering the human soul in its nature, powers and activity, in what sense can it have a social life?

If we were to imagine a field of social life comprising purely spiritual relationships from man to man, that might appear to be so arcane and ethereal that nothing definite and useful could be said about it. This impression will dissipate if we turn to what the Church teaches us about the angels.

An angel is a purely spiritual being created to know, love, praise and serve God. Since this is his only reason for being, all his powers and natural inclinations are ordered for this end. And it is likewise for this purpose that grace illuminates and sublimates the angel by elevating him to the supernatural order, giving him the beatific vision and supernatural love.

The angel therefore needs a society: that of God; and he could not live unaware of his Creator. Now, to him, this society suffices for two reasons: First, because God is perfection itself, and whoever possesses Him needs nothing else; secondly, because the angel’s nature is ordained to God and to God alone.

In fact, the nature of a pure spirit is such that God could have created only him or established that he would know no other being but God himself.

However, the Creator established angelic creation in another way. He wanted the angels to know one another, thus establishing among them a social life which, of course, is all spiritual.

The angels enrich their knowledge of God by contemplating the created Universe

God, however, is the ultimate object of their social life. For in the knowledge that the angels communicate to one another they convey what each is able to announce about God. So each angel has all the operations of his powers applied to God in two ways: a direct way, insofar as he has an immediate relationship with Him; and a mediate [or indirect] way while communicating with Him through other angels. So were things before the creation of our [material] universe.

When the latter was created, it was made known to the angels. And since our universe in its own way also announces the greatness of God, in each created material being, the angels have acquired objects of knowledge that lead them in their own ways to God, the sole and constant object of all angelic operations.

Just as the consideration of the sun, drizzle or thunder elevated the Psalmist to God … or a flower or bird elevated a Saint Francis of Assisi to God … or the wonders of the atom can elevate modern man to God … so also an angel knows them and uses them as ways to God.

Rainbow with lightening over Kawana Island. Photo taken by thinboyfatter.

In this earthly life, except for the Blessed Virgin Mary, who could ever make out what the meditation and love of an angel, who knows our whole Universe and even its smallest secrets, is like? At a single glance [the angel] sees the simultaneous pulsation of life in all beings; and [also] the incessant and mysterious movement of matter in the incalculably large spaces in which the stars move, [and] in the incalculably small spaces in which the universes and constellations of atoms rotate. In everything [the angel] discerns Eternal Wisdom, the absolute and unshakable Power, the perfection of Love “that moves the sun and the other stars.”

The angel is not only contemplative but has an active nature in his own way. He is a warrior of God

We spoke in greater detail about knowledge and love. Let us say a word about the praise and service of God.

Made to praise, the angelic being has so to speak an exclamatory nature. Knowledge and love are not lost without resonance in the august depths of his being. Undoubtedly out of a duty of justice and love towards God, but also by an impulse of his own nature he transmits, communicates and expresses what goes on within him. Hence the incessant angelic praise arises, the magnificence of which the Scripture so often manifests with such diverse terms and symbols.

Made to serve, the angel is not only contemplative, but more suo [in his own way] has an active nature. He communicates to others what he knows about God – this is a teaching service. He is the agent of God’s will in the government of the Universe, for it is through the angels that God governs the visible creation. And this executive function bears a militant aspect, for he is the warrior of God, who before the centuries overthrew Satan and the rebel hosts, and today combats hell and protects the faithful and the Church in the struggle against the power of darkness.

This, then, is what the angel does by his very nature; what he does as a member of the angelic society; and what the angelic society does as a whole, as a society, according to God’s impulse and design.

[1] Editor’s Note: In Latin, minister means servant; therefore, ministeriality means the condition of one who serves, that is, the temporal order must serve the designs of God and of the one true Church, the Roman Catholic and Apostolic Church, for these designs are higher than those of the temporal order, which are at any rate inserted in the supernatural order. In other words, society and the State must be, in their own way, instruments of the sanctification of people, helping them reach their ultimate goal, which is to attain heaven.

To Be Continued…

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News Report from royalcentral.co.uk

Romania’s Prime Minister Mihai Tudose resigned after losing the support from his own political party. Former Prime Minister Tudose recently decided to expel the royal family from Elisabeta Palace.

This resulted in a statement from parliament speaker Liviu Dragnea and leader of the Social Democratic Party where it was announced that Prime Minister Tudose had signed his resignation.

The official application of resignation will be handed over to the country’s president today.

Read the rest here at RoyalCentral

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Frederic Baraga

First Bishop of Marquette, Michigan, U.S.A., born 29 June, 1797, at Malavas, in the parish of Dobernice in the Austrian Dukedom of Carniola; died at Marquette, Michigan, 19 January, 1868.

He was baptized on the very day of his birth, in the parish church of Dobernice, by the names of Irenaeus Frederic, the first of which, however, he never used, retaining only the second. His parents, Johann Nepomuc Baraga and Maria Katharine Josefa (nee de Jencic), had five children, of whom Frederic was the fourth. His father was not rich, but his mother inherited after her father’s death the estate of Malavas, besides a vast fortune. They were God-fearing and pious, and strove, while they survived, to give a good education to their children. His mother died in 1808, and his father in 1812, and Frederic spent his boyhood in the house of Dr. George Dolinar, a layman, professor in the diocesan clerical seminary at Laibach…

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St. Blathmac

Looking towards St. Columba's Bay at Iona (island), Scotland.

Looking towards St. Columba’s Bay at Iona (island), Scotland.

A distinguished Irish monk, b. in Ireland about 750. He suffered martyrdom in Iona, about 835. He is fortunate in having had his biography written by Strabo, Benedictine Abbot of Reichenau (824-849), and thus the story of his martyrdom has been handed down through the ages. Strabo’s life of this saint is in Latin hexameters, and is to be found in Messingham’s “Florilegium Insulæ Sanctorum” (Paris, 1624). A scion of a noble family he early showed a religious turn of mind, and longed to be enrolled in the noble army of martyrs, a wish which was afterwards fulfilled. Subscription7 His name was latinized Florentius (from the fact of the Irish word Blath meaning a flower), and as a religious, he was most exemplary, finally becoming abbot. In 824 he joined the community of Columban monks at Iona, and not long afterwards the Danes ravaged the island. One morning, as he was celebrating Mass, the Scandinavian rovers entered the monastic church and put the monks to death. St. Blathmac refused to point out the shrine of St. Columba, which was really the object of plunder, and he was hacked to pieces on the altar step. His body was afterwards reverently interred where the scene of martyrdom took place, and numerous miracles are claimed to have been wrought through his intercession. The date of his death is given by the “Annals of Ulster” as 825, although Mabillon places it thirty-six years earlier.

REEVES, Adamman (Dublin, 1857); O’DONOVAN, Four Masters (Dublin, 1856); MESSINGHAM, Florilegium Insulae Sanctorum (Paris, 1624); MABILLON, Annales Ordinis S. Benedicti, III; P.G., CXIII; Annals of Ulster (Rolls Series); HEALY, Insula Sanctorum et Doctorum (Dublin, 1902), 4th ed.; MORAN, Irish Saints in Great Britain (Callan, 1903).

W. H. Grattan-Flood (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Sts. Maris, Martha, Audifax, and Abachum

Saints Marius, Martha, Audifax and AbacumAll martyred at Rome in 270. Maris and his wife Martha, who belonged to the Persian nobility, came to Rome with their children in the reign of Emperor Claudius II. As zealous Christians, they sympathized with and succoured the persecuted faithful, and buried the bodies of the slain. This exposed them to the imperial vengeance; they were seized and delivered to the judge Muscianus, who, unable to persuade them to abjure their faith, condemned them to various tortures. At last, when no suffering could subdue their courage, Maris and his sons were beheaded at a place called Nymphæ Catabassi, thirteen miles from Rome, and their bodies burnt. Martha was cast into a well. A Roman lady named Felicitas, having succeeded in securing the half-consumed remains of the father and sons and also the mother’s body from the well, had the sacred relics secretly interred in a catacomb, on the thirteenth before the Kalends of February (20 January). The commemoration of these four martyrs, however, has been appointed for 19 February, doubtless so as to leave the twentieth for the feast of St. Sebastian.

Subscription15

Acta SS. (1643), II Jan., 214-6; BARONIUS, Annales (1589), 270, 2-9, 12-16; BOSCO, Una famiglia di martiri ossia vita dei SS. Mario, Marta, Audiface ed Abaco (Turin, 1892); MOMBRITIUS, Sanctuarium (1479), II, cxxxi-iii; SURIUS, De vitis sanctorum (Venice, 1581), I, 309-10; TILLEMONT, Mém, pour servir à l’hist. ecclés. (1696), IV, 675-7.

LÉON CLUGNET. (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Blessed Marcelo Rafael José María de los Dolores Hilario Spinola y Maestre, Archbishop of Seville

born: 14 January 1835. died 20 January 1906

Marcelo Spínola was born on the island of San Fernando, Cádiz Province. His parents were Juan Spínola y Osorno, Marquis of Spínola and Antonia Maestre y Osorno; they had eight children, of whom four died in infancy. He was baptized the following day in the military parish of San Fernando by the military chaplain of the second battalion of the Real Cuerpo de Artillería de la Marina. His last name is also listed as Espínola…

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January 19 – Saintly King

January 18, 2018

St. Canute IV

Martyr and King of Denmark, date of birth uncertain; died 10 July 1086, the third of the thirteen natural sons of Sweyn II surnamed Estridsen.

Martyr and King of Denmark, date of birth uncertain; died 10 July 1086, the third of the thirteen natural sons of Sweyn II surnamed Estridsen.

Elected king on the death of his brother Harold about 1080, he waged war on his barbarous enemies and brought Courland and Livonia to the faith. Having married Eltha, daughter of Robert, Count of Flanders, he had a son Charles, surnamed the good. He was a strong ruler, as is proved by his stern dealing with the pirate Eigill of Bornholm. The happiness of his people and the interests of the Church were the objects he had most at heart. To the cathedral of Roskilde, still the royal burying-place, he gave his own diadem.  His austerity was equalled by his assiduity in prayer.

The death of Canute the Holy. Painting by Christian Albrecht von Benzon

The death of Canute the Holy. Painting by Christian Albrecht von Benzon

An expedition to England, in favour of the Saxons against William the Conqueror, planned by him in 1085, failed through the treachery of his brother Olaf. His people having revolted on account of the cruelties of certain tax-collectors, Canute retired to the island of Funen. There, in the church of St. Alban, after due preparation for death, the king, his brother Benedict, and seventeen others were surrounded and slain, 10 July, 1086.
His feast is 19 January, translation, 10 July; his emblems, a lance or arrows, in memory of the manner of his death.

Grave of King St. Canute IV the Holy of Denmark at Odense Cathedral a.k.a. St. Canute’s Church

Grave of King St. Canute IV the Holy of Denmark at Odense Cathedral a.k.a. St. Canute’s Church

“Acta SS., July, III, 118-149, containing the life (written in 1105) by Aelnoth, a monk of Canterbury, and also that by SAXO GRAMMATICUS; BOLLANDISTS, “Bibliotheca Hagiographica Latina”, (Brussels, 1898), 232; CHEVALIER. “Repertoire des sources historiques du moyen age” (Paris, 1905); I, col. 771; BUTLER, “Lives of the Saints”, 19 January.PATRICK RYAN (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Pope St. Fabian

(FABIANUS)

Photo of Pope St. Fabian by GFreihalter in Saint-Gratien, France.

Photo of Pope St. Fabian by GFreihalter in Saint-Gratien, France.

Pope (236-250), the extraordinary circumstances of whose election is related by Eusebius (Hist. Eccl., VI, 29). After the death of Anterus he had come to Rome, with some others, from his farm and was in the city when the new election began. While the names of several illustrious and noble persons were being considered, a dove suddenly descended upon the head of Fabian, of whom no one had even thought. To the assembled brethren the sight recalled the Gospel scene of the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Saviour of mankind, and so, divinely inspired, as it were, they chose Fabian with joyous unanimity and placed him in the Chair of Peter. During his reign of fourteen years there was a lull in the storm of persecution. Little is known of his pontificate. The “Liber Pontificalis” says that he divided Rome into seven districts, each supervised by a deacon, and appointed seven subdeacons, to collect, in conjunction with other notaries, the “acta” of the martyrs, i.e. the reports of the court-proceedings on the occasion of their trials (cf. Eus., VI, 43). There is a tradition that he instituted the four minor orders. Under him considerable work was done in the catacombs. He caused the body of Pope St. Pontianus to be exhumed, in Sardinia, and transferred to the catacomb of St. Callistus at Rome. Later accounts, more or less trustworthy, attribute to him the consecration (245) of seven bishops as missionaries to Gaul, among them St. Denys of Paris (Greg. of Tours, Hist. Francor., I, 28, 31). St. Cyprian mentions (Ep., 59) the condemnation by Fabian for heresy of a certain Privatus (Bishop of Lambaesa) in Africa. The famous Origen did not hesitate to defend, before Fabian, the orthodoxy of his teaching (Eus. Hist. Eccl., VI, 34). Fabian died a martyr (20 Jan., 250) at the beginning of the Decian persecution, and was buried in the Crypt of the Popes in the catacomb of St. Callistus, where in recent times (1850) De Rossi discovered his Greek epitaph (Roma Sotterranea II, 59): “Fabian, bishop and martyr.” The decretals ascribed to him in Pseudo-Isidore are apocryphal.

P. GABRIEL MEIER (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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January 20 – St. Sebastian

January 18, 2018

A.D. 288.

St. Sebastian was born at Narbonne, in Gaul, but his parents were of Milan, in Italy, and he was brought up in that city. He was a fervent servant of Christ, and though his natural inclinations gave him an aversion to a military life, yet, to be better able, without suspicion, to assist the confessors and martyrs in their sufferings, he went to Rome, and entered the army under the Emperor Carinus, about the year 283. It happened that the martyrs, Marcus and Marcellianus, under sentence of death, appeared in danger of being shaken in their faith by the tears of their friends: Sebastian seeing this, stept in, and made them a long exhortation to constancy, which he delivered with the holy fire that strongly affected all his hearers. Zoë, the wife of Nicostratus, having for six years lost the use of speech, by a palsy in her tongue, fell at his feet, and spoke distinctly, by the saint’s making the sign of the cross on her mouth…

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Pope Paschal II

(RAINERIUS).

Succeeded Urban II, and reigned from 13 Aug., 1099, till he died at Rome, 21 Jan., 1118. Born in central Italy, he was received at an early age as a monk in Cluny. In his twentieth year he was sent on business of the monastery to Rome, and was retained at the papal court by Gregory VII, and made Cardinal-Priest of St. Clement’s church. It was in this church that the conclave met after the death of Pope Urban, and Cardinal Rainerius was the unanimous choice of the sacred college. He protested vigorously against his election, maintaining, with some justice, that his monastic training had not fitted him to deal with the weighty problems which confronted the papacy in that troublous age…

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St. Agnes of Rome

Of all the virgin martyrs of Rome none was held in such high honour by the primitive church, since the fourth century, as St. Agnes.

Painting of St. Agnes of Rome by Alonso Cano Maler

Painting of St. Agnes of Rome by Alonso Cano Maler

In the ancient Roman calendar of the feasts of the martyrs (Depositio Martyrum), incorporated into the collection of Furius Dionysius Philocalus, dating from 354 and often reprinted, e.g. in Ruinart [Acta Sincera Martyrum (ed. Ratisbon, 1859), 63 sqq.], her feast is assigned to 21 January, to which is added a detail as to the name of the road (Via Nomentana) near which her grave was located. The earliest sacramentaries give the same date for her feast, and it is on this day that the Latin Church even now keeps her memory sacred…

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His Last Will and Testament

The last Will and Testament of Louis XVI, King of France and Navarre, given on Christmas day, 1792.

In the name of the Very holy Trinity, Father, Son and Holy Ghost.

To-day, the 25th day of December, 1792, I, Louis XVI King of France, being for more than four months imprisoned with my family in the tower of the Temple at Paris, by those who were my subjects, and deprived of all communication whatsoever, even with my family, since the eleventh instant; moreover, involved in a trial the end of which it is impossible to foresee, on account of the passions of men, and for which one can find neither pretext nor means in any existing law, and having no other witnesses, for my thoughts than God to whom I can address myself, I hereby declare, in His presence, my last wishes and feelings…

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Blessed Laura Vicuña

Laura del Carmen Vicuña was born on April 5, 1891 in Santiago, Chile. She was the first daughter of the Vicuña Pino family. Her parents were José Domingo Vicuña, a soldier with aristocratic roots, and Mercedes Pino. Her father was in military service and her mother worked at home…

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St. Vincent Mary Pallotti

The founder of the Pious Society of Missions, born at Rome, 21 April, 1798; died there, 22 Jan., 1850. He lies buried in the church of San Salvatore in Onda. He was descended from the noble families of the Pallotti of Norcia and the De Rossi of Rome. His early studies were made at the Pious Schools of San Pantaleone, whence he passed to the Roman College. At the age of sixteen, he resolved to become a secular priest, and on 16 May, 1820, he was ordained. He celebrated his first Mass in the church of the Gesù in Frascati. On 25 July he became a Doctor of Theology, and was soon made a substitute professor of theology in the Roman Archigymnasium. He gave promise of being a distinguished theologian, but decided to dedicate himself entirely to pastoral work…

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Blessed Prince László Batthyány-Strattmann

Ladislaus Batthyány-Strattmann (1870-1931), a layman, doctor and father of a family. He was born on 28 October 1870 in Dunakiliti, Hungary, into an ancient noble family. He was the sixth of 10 brothers. In 1876 the family moved to Austria. When Ladislaus was 12 years old his mother died. He was already convinced at an early age that when he grew up he would be a “doctor of the poor”. He often said:  “When I grow up, I will be a doctor and give free treatment to the sick and the poor”…

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St. Vincent of Saragossa

Deacon of Saragossa, and martyr under Diocletian, 304; mentioned in the Roman Martyrology, 22 Jan., with St. Anastasius the Persian, honoured by the Greeks, 11 Nov. This most renowned martyr of Spain is represented in the dalmatic of a deacon, and has as emblems a cross, a raven, a grate, or a fire-pile. He is honoured as patron in Valencia, Saragossa, Portugal etc., is invoked by vintners, brickmakers, and sailors, and is in the Litany of the Saints. His Acts were read in the churches of Africa at the end of the fourth century, as St. Augustine testifies in Sermon 275. The present Acts (Acta SS., III Jan., 6) date from the eighth or ninth century, and were compiled from tradition. Anal. Boll., I, 259, gives another life…

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According to the Royal Central:

…Romania has re-established the old royal crown as a symbol in several of the state’s institutions… The most significant change is the nation’s coat of arms. The crown will also be present on all the nation’s coins and banknotes printed from 2018.

The Steel Crown of Romania was forged…of the steel of a cannon captured by the Romanian Army from the Ottomans during its War of Independence. Carol I chose steel, and not gold, to symbolise the bravery of the Romanian soldiers. The Crown was used in the proclamation of Romania as a kingdom in 1881 and two coronations.

To read the entire article in the Royal Central, please click here.

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According to The New York Times:

Their core arguments: Countries with monarchies are better off…; monarchies rise above politics; and nations with royalty are generally richer and more stable.

A recent study that examined the economic performance of monarchies versus republics bolsters their views. Led by Mauro F. Guillén, a management professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, the study found “robust and quantitatively meaningful evidence” that monarchies outperform other forms of government.

Charles A. Coulombe of Los Angeles, …a monarchist, said, “If you say you are a monarchist, there is a strain of disloyalty or treason.”

To read the entire article in The New York Times, please click here.

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According to the Smithsonian:

Three years before she was…sentenced to die, Mary, Queen of Scots tried to mend her fractured relationship with her cousin, Elizabeth I. Elizabeth, however, was unmoved.

…a trove of 43 letters…was recently donated to the American Trust for the British Library. The documents…all relate to Mary’s imprisonment in England, where she was held for 19 years before her execution.

The letters are not currently on display at the British library. But…the documents will be digitized and posted online later this year, making them easily accessible to anyone who wishes to explore the tense, precarious relationship between two rival queens.

To read the entire article in the Smithsonian, please click here.

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January 16 – The true disciple of St. Francis who sent the Moorish king into a fit of rage

January 15, 2018

St. Berard of Carbio (Or BERALDUS). Friar Minor and martyr; d. 16 January, 1220. Of the noble family of Leopardi, and a native of Carbio in Umbria, Berard was received into the Franciscan Order by the Seraphic Patriarch himself, in 1213. He was well versed in Arabic, an eloquent preacher, and was chosen by St. […]

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January 16 – When the Emporor insisted that the lapsed be readmitted to communion without penance, one man stood in his way. This is his story.

January 15, 2018

Pope St. Marcellus I His date of birth unknown; elected pope in May or June, 308; died in 309. For some time after the death of Marcellinus in 304 the Diocletian persecution continued with unabated severity. After the abdication of Diocletian in 305, and the accession in Rome of Maxentius to the throne of the […]

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January 16 – Irish Prince and Saint

January 15, 2018

St. Fursey An Abbot of Lagny, near Paris, died 16 Jan., about 650. He was the son of Fintan, son of Finloga, prince of South Muster, and Gelgesia, daughter of Aedhfinn, prince of Hy-Briuin in Connaught. He was born probably amongst the Hy-Bruin, and was baptized by St. Brendan the Traveller, his father’s uncle, who […]

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January 16 – St. Euphrosyne

January 15, 2018

Saint Euphrosyne Died about 470. Her story belongs to that group of legends which relate how Christian virgins, in order the more successfully to lead the life of celibacy and asceticism to which they had dedicated themselves, put on male attire and passed for men. According to the narrative of her life in the “Vitae […]

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January 17 – Scanderbeg: the hero of Christendom

January 15, 2018

In a history, where so much is spoken of the regions, from whence the miraculous Image of Our Lady of Good Counsel came, it will be of great use to take a brief glance at the once entirely Catholic nation in which it so long remained, and at the great client of its Sanctuary in […]

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January 17 – Sister of the Grand Master of Malta

January 15, 2018

St. Roseline of Villeneuve (or Rossolina.) Born at Château of Arcs in eastern Provence, 1263; d. 17 January, 1329. Having overcome her father’s opposition Roseline became a Carthusian nun at Bertaud in the Alps of Dauphiné. Her “consecration” took place in 1288, and about 1330 she succeeded her aunt, Blessed Jeanne or Diane de Villeneuve, […]

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January 18 – St. Margaret of Hungary

January 15, 2018

St. Margaret of Hungary Daughter of King Bela I of Hungary and his wife Marie Laskaris, born 1242; died 18 Jan., 1271. According to a vow which her parents made when Hungary was liberated from the Tatars that their next child should be dedicated to religion, Margaret, in 1245 entered the Dominican Convent of Veszprem. […]

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The Intervention of Our Lady in History

January 11, 2018

By Jeremias Wells Just as in our daily lives we should always be cognizant of the presence of God, so in our analysis of historical events we should always keep in mind the power and intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary over the sweep of history. In this series of studies titled Revolution and Counter-Revolution […]

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St. Stephen, Apostolic King of Hungary, Saint, Warrior, Apostle – Conclusion

January 11, 2018

Continued from Part V St. Francis de Sales and St. Vincent de Paul In a conversation today someone mentioned a phrase of St. Vincent de Paul, who, contemplating St Francis de Sales, said he gave glory to God for the fact that St. Francis de Sales existed. They were contemporaries. And I thought to myself […]

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January 12 – He promoted the use of stained glass

January 11, 2018

St. Benedict Biscop An English monastic founder, born of a noble Anglo-Saxon family, c. 628; died 12 January 690. He spent his youth at the court of the Northumbrian King Oswy. When twenty-five years old, he made the first of his five pilgrimages to Rome. On his return to England, Benedict introduced, whenever he could, […]

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January 12 – “The English Saint Bernard”

January 11, 2018

St. Aelred Abbot of Rievaulx, homilist and historian (1109-66). St. Aelred, whose name is also written Ailred, Æthelred, and Ethelred, was the son of one of those married priests of whom many were found in England in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. He was born at Hexham, but at an early age made the acquaintance […]

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January 13 – This Saint Opposed Bishop Lucifer

January 11, 2018

St. Hilary of Poitiers Bishop, born in that city at the beginning of the fourth century; died there 1 November, according to the most accredited opinion, or according to the Roman Breviary, on 13 January, 368. Belonging to a noble and very probably pagan family, he was instructed in all the branches of profane learning, […]

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January 13 – The Count Who Converted the King

January 11, 2018

St. Remigius of Rheims Apostle of the Franks, Archbishop of Rheims, b. at Cerny or Laon, 437; d. at Rheims, 13 January 533. His father was Emile, Count of Laon. He studied literature at Rheims and soon became so noted for learning and sanctity that he was elected Archbishop of Rheims in his twenty-second year. […]

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January 13 – The bold strategic vision of Cluny

January 11, 2018

Saint Berno of Cluny (c. 850 – 13 January 927) was first abbot of Cluny from its foundation in 910 until he resigned in 925. He was subject only to the pope and began the tradition of the Cluniac reforms which his successors brought to fruition across Europe. Berno was first a monk at St. […]

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January 14 – The Ten Year Old Saint and Some Of Her Miracles

January 11, 2018

Ven. Anne de Guigné When St. Thomas Aquinas’s sister asked him how to become a Saint, he told her to just “will it.” Venerable Anne de Guigné¹ was a child with an iron will and from the moment of her conversion, she willed only one thing…to be a Saint. “To become a Saint is to […]

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January 14 – Matriarch of Saints

January 11, 2018

St. Macrina the Elder Our knowledge of the life of the elder Macrina is derived mainly from the testimony of the great Cappadocian Fathers of the Church, her grandchildren: Basil (Ep. 204:7; 223:3), Gregory of Nyssa (“Vita Macrinae Junioris”), and the panegyric of St. Gregory of Nazianzus on St. Basil (Gregory Naz., Oratio 43). She […]

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January 14 – Blessed Devasahayam Pillai

January 11, 2018

Blessed Devasahayam Pillai Devasahayam Pillai (named Neelakanda Pillai at birth) was born into an affluent Nair-caste family at Nattalam in the present-day Kanyakumari District, on 23 April 1712. His father Vasudevan Namboodiri, hailed from Kayamkulam, in present-day Kerala state, and was working as a priest at Sri Adi Kesava Perumal temple in Thiruvattar in present-day […]

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January 15 – Most Glorious King Ceolwulp

January 11, 2018

King Ceolwulf (also CEOLWULPH or CEOLULPH) Coelwulf, King of Northumbria and monk of Lindisfarne, date and place of birth not known; died at Lindisfarne, 764. His ancestry is thus given by the “Anglo-Saxon Chronicle”: “Ceolwulf was the son of Cutha, Cutha of Cuthwin, Cuthwin of Leoldwald, Leoldwald of Egwald, Egwald of Aldhelm, Aldhelm of Ocga, […]

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January 15 – St. Maurus & St. Placidus

January 11, 2018

St. Maurus Deacon, son of Equitius, a nobleman of Rome, but claimed also by Fondi, Gallipoli, Lavello etc.; died 584. Feast, 15 Jan. He is represented as an abbot with crozier, or with book and censer, or holding the weights and measures of food and drink given him by his holy master. He is the […]

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January 9 – St. Adrian of Canterbury

January 8, 2018

St. Adrian of Canterbury An African by birth, died 710. He became Abbot of Nerida, a Benedictine monastery near Naples, when he was very young. Pope Vitalian intended to appoint him Archbishop of Canterbury to succeed St. Deusdedit, who had died in 664, but Adrian considered himself unworthy of so great a dignity, and begged […]

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January 9 – St. Peter of Sebaste

January 8, 2018

St. Peter of Sebaste Bishop, born about 340; died 391. He belonged to the richly blest family of Basil and Emmelia of Caesarea in Cappadocia, from which also sprang St. Macrina the Younger (q.v.) and the two great Cappadocian doctors, Basil of Caesarea and Gregory of Nyssa. He was the youngest of a large family, […]

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January 9 – Blessed Tommaso Reggio

January 8, 2018

Blessed Tommaso Reggio Bl. Tommaso Reggio was born in Genoa, Italy, on 9 January 1818 to the Marquis of Reggio and Angela Pareto. He had a comfortable upbringing which gave him a solid Christian and cultural background and assured him of a brilliant career. However, at the age of 20 he decided to become a […]

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January 10 – Doge of Venice and Saint of Heaven

January 8, 2018

St. Peter Urseolus (Orseolo) Born at Rivo alto, Province of Udina, 928; at Cuxa, 10 January, 987 (997 is less probable). Sprung from the wealthy and noble Venetian family, the Orseoli, Peter led from his youth an earnest Christian life. In the service of the republic, he distinguished himself in naval battles against the pirates. […]

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January 10 – Patient to the Penitent, Inflexible to the Impenitent

January 8, 2018

St. William, Confessor, Archbishop of Bourges (c. 1155 – January 10, 1209) William Berruyer, of the illustrious family of the ancient counts of Nevers, was educated by Peter the hermit, archdeacon of Soissons, his uncle by the mother’s side. He learned from his infancy to despise the folly and emptiness of the riches and grandeur […]

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January 11 – Wounded in a duel

January 8, 2018

Blessed Bernard Scammacca, O.P. He was born in 1430 to a noble family of Catania, Sicily and given the name Anthony. As was typical of young men at that time, he fought duels. In one of them, his leg was badly wounded. As Anthony convalesced, he had time to think about his life and his […]

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Here We Go Again

January 4, 2018

According to The Royal Central: Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has suggested that Australia should turn to a postal survey, if or when they break ties as a constitutional monarchy. Peter Fitzsimons, Chair of the Australian Republic Movement (ARM) was delighted at the possibility of the vote and urged for a commitment for a national […]

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Don John of Austria Does His Best To Quell The Dutch Revolt

January 4, 2018

Don John had had to use a great deal of patience, but at length in January 1578 three thousand of the Spanish troops which he had sent away after the Eternal Edict came back, and without losing a moment he marched from Luxembourg in a north-westerly direction. At Gembloux, just across the Brabant boundary, he […]

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St. Stephen, Apostolic King of Hungary, Saint, Warrior, Apostle – Part V

January 4, 2018

Continued from Part IV Saint Stephen as Warrior and Judge Another summary, also on St. Stephen, catches aspects of his personality as warrior and judge.  “To the piety and zeal of an apostle St. Stephen of Hungary joined the courage of a warrior and hero. In his instructions to his son, St. Emeric, he noted […]

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January 5 – Pope St. Telesphorus

January 4, 2018

(About 125-136.) St. Telesphorus was the seventh Roman bishop in succession from the Apostles, and, according to the testimony of St. Irenæus (Adv. hæreses, III, iii, 3), suffered a glorious martyrdom. Eusebius (Hist. eccl., IV, vii, xiv) places the beginning of his pontificate in the twelfth of Hadrian’s reign (128-129), his death in the first […]

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January 6 – St. Roch

January 4, 2018

St. Roch Born at Montpellier towards 1295; died 1327. His father was governor of that city. At his birth St. Roch is said to have been found miraculously marked on the breast with a red cross. Deprived of his parents when about twenty years old, he distributed his fortune among the poor, handed over to […]

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Epiphany – The Three Kings made the Kingship of Christ Manifest to the Pagan World

January 4, 2018

The Epiphany of Our Lord Saints Balthasar, Caspar and Melchior Epiphany, which in the original Greek signifies appearance or manifestation, as St. Augustin observes, (1) is a festival principally solemnized in honor of the discovery Jesus Christ made of himself to the Magi, or wise men; who, soon after his birth, by a particular inspiration […]

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January 7 – St. Kentigerna

January 4, 2018

St. Kentigerna, Widow She is commemorated on the 7th of January, in the Aberdeen Breviary, from which we learn, that she was of royal blood, daughter of Kelly, prince of Leinster in Ireland, as Colgan proves from ancient monuments. She was mother of the holy abbot St. Fœlan, or Felan. After the death of her […]

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January 7 – Ordered bandits of royal blood to hang from the highest mast

January 4, 2018

St. Canut Second son of Eric the Good, king of Denmark, he was made duke of Sleswig, his elder brother Nicholas being king of Denmark. Their father, who lived with his people as a father with his children, and no one ever left him without comfort, says the ancient chronicle Knytling-Saga, p. 71. died in […]

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January 7 – St. Aldric

January 4, 2018

St. Aldric Bishop of Le Mans in the time of Louis le Debonnaire, born c. 800; died at Le Mans, 7 January, 856. As a youth he lived in the court of Charlemagne, at Aix la Chapelle, as well as in that of his son and successor Louis. By both monarchs he was highly esteemed, […]

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January 8 – St. Severinus

January 4, 2018

St. Severinus Abbot, and Apostle of Noricum, or Austria A.D. 482. We know nothing of the birth or country of this saint. From the purity of his Latin, he was generally supposed to be a Roman; and his care to conceal what he was according to the world, was taken for a proof of his […]

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January 8 – Hapsburg Saint

January 4, 2018

St. Gudula (Latin, Guodila) Born in Brabant, Belgium, of Witger and Amalberga, in the seventh century; died at the beginning of the eighth century. After the birth of Gudula her mother Amalberga, who is herself venerated as a saint, embraced the religious life, and according to tradition received the veil at the hands of St. […]

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January 2 – The Infant of Prague

January 1, 2018

Its earliest history can be traced back to Prague in the year 1628 when the small, 19-inch high, wooden and coated wax statue of the Infant Jesus was given by Princess Polyxena von Lobkowicz (1566–1642) to the Discalced Carmelites, to whom she had become greatly attached. The princess had received the statue as a wedding […]

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January 2 – St. Basil the Great

January 1, 2018

St. Basil the Great Bishop of Caesarea, and one of the most distinguished Doctors of the Church. Born probably 329; died 1 January, 379. He ranks after Athanasius as a defender of the Oriental Church against the heresies of the fourth century. With his friend Gregory of Nazianzus and his brother Gregory of Nyssa, he […]

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January 3 – Saint Joseph Mary Tomasi

January 1, 2018

Saint Joseph Mary Tomasi The very eminent servant of God Joseph Mary Tomasi, Cardinal, whom Pope Pius VII decorated with the honors of the Blessed in 1803, and whom today the Supreme Pontiff John Paul II ascribes solemnly in the book of the Saints, was born at Licata, in Sicily, the Diocese of Agrigento, on […]

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January 3 – The saint who twice saved Paris

January 1, 2018

St. Genevieve Patroness of Paris, born at Nanterre, circa 419 or 422; died at Paris, 512. Her feast is kept on 3 January. She was the daughter of Severus and Gerontia; popular tradition represents her parents as poor peasants, though it seems more likely that they were wealthy and respectable townspeople. In 429 St. Germain […]

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