St. Anthelm of Belley

(1107 – 1178) Prior of the Carthusian Grand Chartreuse and bishop of Belley.

He was born near Chambéry in 1107. He would later receive an ecclesiastical benefice in the area of Belley. When he was thirty years old, he resigned from this position to become a Carthusian monk at Portes. Only two years after joining the order, he was made the prior of the Grande Chartreuse, the motherhouse of his order, which had recently incurred substantial damage.

He was an effective administrator there. While under his direction, the community increased in numbers and fervency. He restored and improved the buildings, including constructing a defensive wall and an aqueduct. The rules of the order were standardized, and changed to allow women the opportunity to enter the order in their own houses. He also brought the other houses of the order into closer alignment with the motherhouse. The monks under his direction included Hugh of Lincoln, who expressed great fondness for Anthelm…

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St. Ladislaus

Photo of the Reliquary of King Saint Ladislaus I of Hungary by Asybaris01 and located in the Cathedral of Győr.

Photo of the Reliquary of King Saint Ladislaus I of Hungary by Asybaris01 and located in the Cathedral of Győr.

King of Hungary, born 1040; died at Neutra, 29 July, 1095; one of Hungary’s national Christian heroes. He was the son of Béla I; the nobles, after the death of Geisa I, passed over Solomon, son of Andrew I, and chose Ladislaus to be their king in 1077. It is true that he made peace with Solomon, when the latter gave up all claims to the throne of Hungary; however, later on he rebelled against Ladislaus, who took him prisoner and held in the fortress of Visegrád. On the occasion of the canonization of Stephen I, Ladislaus gave Solomon his freedom, but in 1086 Solomon, with the aid of the heathen Cumans, revolted against Ladislaus a second time; the latter, however, vanquished them, and in 1089 gained another victory over the Turkish Cumans. In 1091 Ladislaus marched into Croatia, at the request of his sister, the widowed Queen Helena, and took possession of the kingdom for the crown of Hungary, where, in 1092, he founded the Bishopric of Agram (Zágráb). In the same year (1092), he also founded the Bishopric of Grosswardein (Nagy-Várad), in Hungary, which, however, some trace back to Stephen I. Ladislaus governed the religious and civil affairs of his assembly of the Imperial States at Szabolcs, that might almost be called a synod. He tried vigorously to suppress the remaining heathen customs. He was buried in the cathedral of Grosswardein. He still lives in the sagas and poems of his people as a chivalrous king. In 1192 he was canonized by Celestine III.

MICHAEL BIHL (Catholic Encyclopedia)

Gentiana cruciata, also called "the herb of Saint Ladislaus" Photo by BerndH. One of the many miracles attributed to the King is this herb. On the occasion of some pestilence in the country, King St. Ladislaus is said to have prayed for the cure before shooting an arrow into the air at random; the arrow then hit this herb, which would cure the illness.

Gentiana cruciata, also called “the herb of Saint Ladislaus” Photo by BerndH. One of the many miracles attributed to the King is this herb. On the occasion of some pestilence in the country, King St. Ladislaus is said to have prayed for the cure before shooting an arrow into the air at random; the arrow then hit this herb, which would cure the illness.

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Nobility.org Editorial comment: —

St. Ladislaus is a most worthy example for today’s nobility and analogous traditional elites.
The strict fulfillment of his duties as King of Hungary was no obstacle to his sanctification. He led his people in war and in peace; administered justice and promoted the general welfare; and he died at age 54 amidst preparations to lead the First Crusade.
One can say that he made the Cross of Our Divine Savior the center of his life. He believed, loved, and served the great truths of the Faith. He understood well that this life is a great test where men choose if they are for God or against Him. He believed that life is a constant struggle against the devil, the flesh and the world. He declared for God and thrust himself into the fray with all his heart. And he never looked back.
St. Ladislaus stands in stark contrast against the millions today who have eliminated God and His law from their lives, withholding their adoration from Him in order to give it to the false gods they worship: worldly vanity; avaricious wealth; spiritual and sensual pleasures; comfort and relaxation; a life of superficiality, fun and total lack of responsibility.

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St. Cyril of Alexandria

Doctor of the Church. St. Cyril has his feast in the Western Church on the 28th of January; in the Greek Menaea it is found on the 9th of June, and (together with St. Athanasius) on the 18th of January.

He seems to have been of an Alexandrian family and was the son of the brother of Theophilus, Patriarch of Alexandria; if he is the Cyril addressed by Isidore of Pelusium in Ep. xxv of Bk. I, he was for a time a monk. He accompanied Theophilus to Constantinople when that bishop held the “Synod of the Oak” in 402 and deposed St. John Chrysostom…

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June 28 – St. Irenaeus

June 25, 2018

St. Irenaeus

Bishop of Lyons, and Father of the Church.

Information as to his life is scarce, and in some measure inexact. He was born in Proconsular Asia, or at least in some province bordering thereon, in the first half of the second century; the exact date is controverted, between the years 115 and 125, according to some, or, according to others, between 130 and 142. It is certain that, while still very young, Irenaeus had seen and heard the holy Bishop Polycarp (d. 155) at Smyrna. During the persecution of Marcus Aurelius, Irenaeus was a priest of the Church of Lyons. The clergy of that city, many of whom were suffering imprisonment for the Faith, sent him (177 or 178) to Rome with a letter to Pope Eleutherius concerning Montanism, and on that occasion bore emphatic testimony to his merits. Returning to Gaul, Irenaeus succeeded the martyr Saint Pothinus as Bishop of Lyons…

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Pope Saint Paul I


Pope Saint Paul I reigned from 757 to 767

Date of birth unknown; died at Rome, 28 June, 767. He was a brother of Pope Stephen II. They had been educated for the priesthood at the Lateran palace.

Stephen entrusted his brother, who approved of the pope’s course in respect to King Pepin, with many important ecclesiastical affairs, among others with the restoration to the Roman States of the cities which had been seized by the Lombard Kings Aistulf and Desiderius; these cities Desiderius promised to give up.

While Paul was with his dying brother at the Lateran, a party of the Romans gathered in the house of Archdeacon Theophylact in order to secure the latter’s succession to the papal see. However, immediately after the burial of Stephen (died 26 April, 757), Paul was elected by a large majority, and received episcopal consecration on the twenty-ninth of May…

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In 1096 Godrey de Bouillon (c1060-1100), Duke of Lorraine, joined the First Crusade. It took three years to liberate the Holy City of Jerusalem. Godfrey took the title, Advocatus Sancti Sepulchri, Protector of the Holy Sepulchre, instead of King.

Godfrey of Bouillon

The leaders of the Christian armies which now quitted the West were already celebrated by their valor and their deeds. At the head of the great captains who commanded in this crusade, history, as well as poetry, must place Godfrey de Bouillon, duke of the Lower Lorraine. He was of the illustrious race of the counts of Boulogne, and descended on the female side from Charlemagne. From his earliest youth he had distinguished himself in the open war carried on between the Holy See and the emperor of Germany. On the field of battle he had killed Rodolphe de Rhenfield, duke of Swabia, to whom Gregory had sent the imperial crown. When the war broke out in Italy for the cause of the anti-pope Anaclet, Godfrey was the first to enter the city of Rome, besieged and taken by the troops of Henry. He afterwards repented of having embraced a party which victory itself could not make triumphant, and which the greater part of Christendom considered sacrilegious. To expiate exploits condemned as useless by the spirit of his age, he made a vow to go to Jerusalem, not as a pilgrim, but as a liberator.

Rudolph, the Anti-Kaiser of Henry IV, Loses His Arm in Combat. Engraving by Bernhard Rode, 1781.

Contemporary history, which has transmitted his portrait to us, informs us that he joined the bravery and virtues of a hero to the simplicity of a cenobite. His prowess in fight and his extraordinary strength of body made him the pride of camps. Prudence and moderation tempered his valor; his devotion was sincere and disinterested; and in no instance during the holy war did he employ his courage or inflict his vengeance but upon the enemies of Christ.

The anti-Pope Anaclet II kneeling before Pope Innocent II and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux. Painting by Antonio Pietro di Pietri.

Faithful to his word, liberal, affable, full of humanity, the princes and knights looked upon him as their model, the soldiers as their father—all were eager to fight under his standard. If he was not the leader of the crusade, as some writers pretend, he at least obtained that empire which virtue bestows. Amidst their quarrels and divisions, the princes and barons constantly appealed to the wisdom of Godfrey, and in the dangers of war, his counsels became absolute orders.

Joseph François Michaud, The History of the Crusades of the Crusades, trans. W. Robson (New York, Redfield, 1853), vol. I, 76-7.

Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 631

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According to BBC News:

After years of lobbying, industrial producers are now allowed to make camembert with pasteurised milk. As a result, one of France’s beloved cheeses may be disappearing – for good.

For decades, it seemed that a stalemate had been reached between artisanal and industrial producers, until this February, when they came to a compromise: one unified AOP requiring the use of milk from Normande cows from Normandy – but allowing pasteurisation.

“Pasteurised milk isn’t milk anymore!” culinary journalist Périco Légasse cried… “Raw milk is the essence of a cheese.”

To read the entire article on BBC News, please click here.

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By Prof. Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

  Why does the devil want to destroy, as much as is possible, all forms of inequality?

After having studied that which constitutes order in the universe, we will now give the theory of disorder. What does disorder consist of, and why does the devil want it?

After that we will explain the theory on the Revolution.* The Revolution cannot be separated from disorder. Disorder is a state of things, and the Revolution is an ensemble of movements which lead to that state. Disorder is the end; Revolution is the means. The theory on disorder comprises a theory on the Revolution. However, the part on the Revolution will not be given here.

The next objective of our demonstration consists of knowing why the devil wants uniformity and equality. In order to understand this well, we must delve into what we would call “the devil’s state of spirit.” For this end, we must consider things from an anthropomorphic standpoint.

Example of the Bankrupt Japanese

Let us imagine, for example, an individual who is suffering.

I remember the case of a Japanese man who owned the house that I rented on Saint Efigenia Street. His finances were in a terrible state, and a fire broke out in his house. And he, who was already on the verge of declaring bankruptcy, saw that his merchandise was being burned up and that he could be accused of trying to declare a fraudulent bankruptcy. Therefore, in addition to the disgrace of bankruptcy, he would suffer that of having to go to jail. So he went into the house amid the flames, trying to put out the fire. In the midst of this disaster, the flaming ceiling fell on him and burned him quite badly, and he went to the hospital in a miserable state.

Now picture this Japanese lying there in hospital, his finances insolvent. While recovering, he would reflect as every individual who has gone through a disaster:
“Everything is lost, what remains for me?” However little he might still have, he needed to assess what was left in order to figure out what he was going to do.

What to do During Eternity?

Now, this is precisely what happened with the devil. He revolted against God, and was cast into disgrace.

Evidently, considering things from an anthropomorphic point of view, the devil did the same as the Japanese man: “I have eternity before me; what to do during eternity?”

Naturally, finding a solution would require making a little survey of his situation.

1) “The first thing that remains to me is my being. The second thing is my angelic nature. I have become a reprobate, an evil, eternally unhappy being, but I continue to be an angel and to have all the lucidity and power of my nature. Thirdly, I have a certain freedom of movement, which I can increase by multiplying the number of sins committed.”
When the sins of men increase, God grants the devil a greater possibility of tempting them, and in this way the devil can increase his freedom of movement.

Early 18th Century Ivory carvings of the Fall of the Rebel Angels, with the mouth of hell at the very bottom.

2) “On the other hand, God’s work contains something which one could call a weak point: mankind. There is nothing I can do against the angels. They are already confirmed in grace and can no longer sin.

To do evil to inanimate creation interests me, but not as much as employing against mankind, the weak point in creation, my intelligence and capacity for domination. Mankind is the weak point precisely because it finds itself in crisis; it is a weak point because it is the part of creation on which I can work to cause its demise. I will combine all my elements and cast myself upon it.”

Why would he cast himself upon mankind?

3) The devil might think, “After all, what does it profit me to disturb the work of God?”

From a certain point of view, this is a failure for the devil because he is unable to eliminate God or hinder the intrinsic glory of God in any way whatsoever. As for His extrinsic glory, God draws it also from Hell, for the horror of Hell glorifies God in His justice. As a consequence, even while inciting man to sin, the devil ends by giving glory to God. And therefore, everything that he does against God can only revert to God’s greater glory.

Reason for the Devil’s Insults against God

So what does it avail the devil to insult God? There is a French proverb which says, “Insult the sun, and it will shine regardless.” Now, the devil knows quite well that it is the same with God. And the devil’s insults are detestable actions, a sign of the eternal and inexorable disorder in which he finds himself.

In order to better understand what the devil is doing in hell and why he tempts men, we must first eliminate a certain idea from our minds.

On the windscreen by the entrance of the Church of the Immaculate Conception were pinned some small, extremely pious pictures of popular art. The more picturesque depicted a man in the process of losing his soul, and later on, in hell. It shows a large bed covered with many blankets, and the well-off bourgeois lying down. On one side of his bed, a priest exhorts him to repentance; on the other side, a frightful demon shows him, in a mirror, the reflection of a shepherdess. The man, hesitating, has one hand extended toward the priest and the other toward the shepherdess.

The temptations of the devil. The heart of man – either a temple of God, or a habitation of Satan

The next drawing shows an intense fire with many demons immersed in it, but looking as if they wanted to get out of there. This is precisely what is wrong with this representation, for if there is one thing which the devil does not want is to leave hell. As great as his horror for hell might be, the devil does not want to leave it. He went to hell out of an act of his own free will, an act of revolt against God. And he remains in hell not only because God, who condemned him to it, does not let him leave, but also because he does not want to leave. His will is fixed in evil. He hates God and wants nothing to do with Him.

An Absurd and Contradictory Psychology

One should recognize just how stupid, absurd, and contradictory this psychology is. It is stupid because for someone to clearly recognize that he has turned against his own ultimate end and has erred, and yet to remain in this position is properly speaking what you would call a stupid attitude. It is contradictory because one cannot understand how a person could place himself in such a position of evident contradiction in relation to his own end. It is absurd because the devil remains torn asunder, placing himself between that end for which he was created, and the eternal unhappiness which he wants because he wants it.

The Devil’s Intention: to Oppose God’s Work with Men

Although he knows that he can do nothing against God, he wants to do the opposite of God’s plan in that part of creation which is still subject to transformations and changes, that is, humanity.

What is the intention of a being who puts himself in this position? His intention is to counter the work of God in men, to take the greatest possible number to hell, and to work for those who do go to heaven to be less holy than they could have been. He also desires in some way to disfigure material creation inasmuch as it gives glory to God. All these actions are in accordance with the devil’s motto: ad majorem Dei injuriam.

The Illness of Pierrot by Thomas Couture. Pierrot is ill from his dissolute way of life as the ample evidence of his excessive drinking and traces of his dinner scattered across the floor are seen. Despite this, the doctor checking Pierrot’s pulse remains perplexed by his illness. An inscription on the top left reads: “Science makes the doctor see what is not and prevents him from seeing what is obvious to everyone.” Couture painted everyday scenes that instructed his viewers to lead a good and blameless life.

In order to comprehend the devil’s position, we should imagine some attitudes that men sometimes take. Here is an example:

When there were trains going to the city of Santos, some passengers got out and jostled some street urchins nearby. Those brats did not like it and began to grumble among themselves. Then the passengers boarded and the train departed. When the train started to move, the kids threw a volley of stones at it, although knowing they wouldn’t hit it. They knew that it was a futile manifestation of hatred, but their desire to manifest their rage led them to do it. It was a form of useless protest, the perfect state of mind of the devil.

Man, the Battlefield between God and the Devil
Since the devil acts like this towards God, we conclude that on this earth, which is the battlefield between God and the devil, between the good angels and the bad angels, there are two things which interest the devil: first, mankind; and second, material creation.

It is necessary to say a word about material creation.

In the Summa contra Gentiles, St. Thomas addresses the question of the end of the world. After describing what is going to happen, he asks what is going to be done with material beings after the end of the world. St. Thomas says that it is proper to the goodness of God not to destroy those beings which He created, and which should continue to exist for His glory. Thus, the stars and celestial bodies which God created will continue to exist. And this ensemble composed of pure spirits (angels), man (a combination of spirit and matter), and purely material beings will continue to exist, albeit in a special way. There will be on earth a great fire which will destroy the beings susceptible to corruption and proliferation. In the final analysis, all living things will be destroyed in that fire. And a kind of invariability will come to reign upon the earth, expelling everything that might be death or an image of death. Animals and plants will no longer exist. Only the earth will remain, along with those things which men accomplished upon it. And in its own way, the material unity will contribute to render glory to God.

Devil appears noting down man’s sins on the stone side wall of a choir stall in the Minster of St Martin, the former collegiate church of St Cassius and St Florentinus in Bonn (North Rhein-Wesphalia). The same choir stall contains an angel noting down man’s good deeds.

Considering these things, men will find yet another reason to love God, even though they are already in heaven.

Therefore, the devil plans to cause as many men as possible to go to hell; to prevent the good things God placed in creation from being noticed and thus to hinder the edification and sanctification of mankind; and to prevent man, who should complete the beauty of the earth with his own work, from doing so. If possible, the devil will also destroy anything made by God. But it is necessary to note that material things are very secondary. The essential for the devil is to obtain as many souls as possible; they are precisely the center of the battle.

* The word Revolution is used here in the sense given it by Prof. Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira in his book, Revolution and Counter-Revolution.

 

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Today is the anniversary of the Battle of Sisak in Croatia. The Battle of Sisak was the Croatian Siege of Vienna. On June 22nd 1593 Ban Tomas Erdődy faced off an army of 16,000 Ottomans with his army of 4,500-5,000 men. When the battle was over Erdődy lost 500 men and the Ottomans had lost over 8,000. When Erdődy saw that they were successful in battle he fell to his knees and said: “In God we have prevailed”. This photo is a painting of when Erdődy saw that the Croatian/Austrian army had won.

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St. Thomas More

Saint, knight, Lord Chancellor of England, author and martyr, born in London, 7 February, 1477-78; executed at Tower Hill, 6 July, 1535.

He was the sole surviving son of Sir John More, barrister and later judge, by his first wife Agnes, daughter of Thomas Graunger. While still a child Thomas was sent to St. Anthony’s School in Threadneedle Street, kept by Nicholas Holt, and when thirteen years old was placed in the household of Cardinal Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Lord Chancellor. Here his merry character and brilliant intellect attracted the notice of the archbishop, who sent him to Oxford, where he entered at Canterbury Hall (subsequently absorbed by Christ Church) about 1492. His father made him an allowance barely sufficient to supply the necessaries of life and, in consequence, he had no opportunity to indulge in “vain or hurtful amusements” to the detriment of his studies. At Oxford he made friends with William Grocyn and Thomas Linacre , the latter becoming his first instructor in Greek. Without ever becoming an exact scholar he mastered Greek “by an instinct of genius” as witnessed by Pace (De fructu qui ex doctrina percipitur, 1517), who adds “his eloquence is incomparable and twofold, for he speaks with the same facility in Latin as in his own language”. Besides the classics he studied French, history, and mathematics, and also learned to play the flute and the viol. After two years’ residence at Oxford, More was recalled to London and entered as a law student at New Inn about 1494. In February, 1496, he was admitted to Lincoln’s Inn as a student, and in due course was called to the outer bar and subsequently made a bencher. His great abilities now began to attract attention and the governors of Lincoln’s Inn appointed him “reader” or lecturer on law at Furnival’s Inn, his lectures being esteemed so highly that the appointment was renewed for three successive years…
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St. Paulinus, Bishop of Nola

(Pontius Meropius Anicius Paulinus.)

Born at Bordeaux about 354; died 22 June, 431. He sprang from a distinguished family of Aquitania and his education was entrusted to the poet Ausonius. He became governor of the Province of Campania, but he soon realized that he could not find in public life the happiness he sought. From 380 to 390 he lived almost entirely in his native land. He married a Spanish lady, a Christian named Therasia. To her, to Bishop Delphinus of Bordeaux and his successor the Presbyter Amandus, and to St. Martin of Tours, who had cured him of some disease of the eye, he owed his conversion. He and his brother were baptized at the same time by Delphinus. When Paulinus lost his only child eight days after birth, and when he was threatened with the charge of having murdered his brother, he and his wife decided to withdraw from the world, and to enter the monastic life. They went to Spain about 390…

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St. John Fisher

Cardinal, Bishop of Rochester, and martyr; born at Beverley, Yorkshire, England, 1459 (?1469); died 22 June, 1535. John was the eldest son of Robert Fisher, merchant of Beverley, and Agnes his wife. His early education was probably received in the school attached to the collegiate church in his native town, whence in 1484 he removed to Michaelhouse, Cambridge. He took the degree of B.A. in 1487, proceeded M.A. in 1491, in which year he was elected a fellow of his college, and was made Vicar of Northallerton, Yorkshire. In 1494 he resigned his benefice to become proctor of his university, and three years later was appointed Master of Michaelhouse, about which date he became chaplain and confessor to Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond and Derby, mother of King Henry VII. In 1501 he received the degree of D.D., and was elected Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge University. Under Fisher’s guidance, the Lady Margaret founded St. John’s and Christ’s Colleges at Cambridge, and also the two “Lady Margaret” professorships of divinity at Oxford and Cambridge respectively, Fisher himself being the first occupant of the Cambridge chair…

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St. Etheldreda

Queen of Northumbria; born (probably) about 630; died at Ely, 23 June, 679.

While still very young she was given in marriage by her father, Anna, King of East Anglia, to a certain Tonbert, a subordinate prince, from whom she received as morning gift a tract of land locally known as the Isle of Ely. She never lived in wedlock with Tonbert, however, and for five years after his early death was left to foster her vocation to religion.

Her father then arranged for her a marriage of political convenience with Egfrid, son and heir to Oswy, King of Northumbria. From this second bridegroom, who is said to have been only fourteen years of age, she received certain lands at Hexham; through St. Wilfrid of York she gave these lands to found the minster of St. Andrew. St. Wilfrid was her friend and spiritual guide, but it was to him that Egfrid, on succeeding his father, appealed for the enforcement of his marital rights as against Etheldreda’s religious vocation…

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St. John the Baptist

The principal sources of information concerning the life and ministry of St. John the Baptist are the canonical Gospels. Of these St. Luke is the most complete, giving as he does the wonderful circumstances accompanying the birth of the Precursor and items on his ministry and death. St. Matthew’s Gospel stands in close relation with that of St. Luke, as far as John’s public ministry is concerned, but contains nothing in reference to his early life. From St. Mark, whose account of the Precursor’s life is very meagre, no new detail can be gathered. Finally, the fourth Gospel has this special feature, that it gives the testimony of St. John after the Saviour’s baptism. Besides the indications supplied by these writings, passing allusions occur in such passages as Acts, xiii, 24; xix, 1-6; but these are few and bear on the subject only indirectly. To the above should be added that Josephus relates in his Jewish Antiquities (XVIII, v, 2), but it should be remembered that he is woefully erratic in his dates, mistaken in proper names, and seems to arrange facts according to his own political views; however, his judgment of John, also what he tells us regarding the Precursor’s popularity, together with a few details of minor importance, are worthy of the historian’s attention. The same cannot be said of the apocryphal gospels, because the scant information they give of the Precursor is either copied from the canonical Gospels (and to these they can add no authority), or else is a mass of idle vagaries…

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by Antonio Borrelli

Maria Clotilde of Savoy is one of the most striking examples of how to achieve union with Christ while remaining in the world in environments which by their nature lead instead to distraction, pride of power, luxury and a worldly lifestyle, things once usually abundant in the royal and imperial courts of Europe.

She was born in Turin on 2 March 1843, the eldest of eight children of King Vittorio Emanuele II and Queen Maria Adelaide of Austria. From her parents and grandparents, Carlo Alberto and Maria Teresa, rulers of Piedmont and Sardinia, she received an excellent religious education and was attracted to Jesus from an early age. In order to increase her love of Christ, she read and assimilated the writings of Bourdalone, Father Croiset, and Massillon.

As her mother died prematurely, she took an interest in helping her orphaned siblings. On 11 June 1853, in the castle of Stupinigi she received her first Holy Communion; and on that day, memorable for all children, Maria Clotilde wrote her plans for the future, including one of absolute simplicity: “Jesus, from now on I want to act only to please Thee…

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St. Maximus of Turin

Bishop and theological writer, b. probably in Rhaetia, about 380; d. shortly after 465. Only two dates are historically established in his life. In 451 he was at the synod of Milan where the bishops of Northern Italy accepted the celebrated letter (epistola dogmatica) of Leo I, setting forth the orthodox doctrine of the Incarnation against the Nestorians and Eutychians (Mansi, “SS. Conc. Coll. Ampl.”, VI, 143). Among nineteen subscribers Maximus is the eighth, and since the order was determined by age, Maximus must then have been about seventy years old. The second established date is 465, when he was at the Synod of Rome. (Mansi, VII, 959, 965 sq.) Here the subscription of Maximus follows immediately after the pope’s, showing he was the oldest of the forty-eight bishops present. The approximate time and place of his birth may be surmised from a passage in Sermo 81 (P.L., LVII, 695), where he designates himself as a witness of the martyrdom of three missionary priests in 397 at Anaunia in the Rhaetian Alps. History does not mention him after 465. He is the first known bishop of Turin, then a suffragan see of Milan. His successor was St. Victor. His name is in the Roman martyrology on 25 June, and the city of Turin honours him as its patron. A life which, however, is entirely unreliable, was written after the eleventh century, and is printed in “Acta SS.”, June, VII, 3rd ed., 44-46. It states that a cleric one day followed him with an evil intention to a retired chapel, where the saint was wont to pray. The cleric suddenly became so thirsty that he implored Maximus for help. A roe happened to pass which the saint caused to stop, so that the cleric could partake of its milk. This legend accounts for the fact that St. Maximus is represented in art as pointing at a roe…

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(Or WILLIAM OF MONTE VERGINE.)

Saint William of Vercelli's statue at St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican. 1878

Statue of Saint William of Vercelli at St. Peter’s Basilica, Vatican.

The founder of the Hermits of Monte Vergine, or Williamites, born 1085; died 25 June, 1142. He was the son of noble parents, both of whom died when he was still a child, and his education was entrusted to one of his kinsmen. At the age of fifteen he made up his mind to renounce the world and lead a life of penance. With this end in view, he went on a pilgrimage to St. James of Compostella, and, not content with the ordinary hardships of such a pilgrimage, he encircled his body with iron bands to increase his suffering. After this journey he started on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, but it was revealed to him that he would be of greater service to God if he remained in Italy. He built himself a hut on Monte Vergine, wishing to become a hermit and live in solitude, but it was not long before many people flocked to him to put themselves under his guidance, being attracted by the sanctity of his life and the many miracles which he performed. Soon a monastery was built, and by 1119 the Congregation of Monte Vergine (q.v.) was founded. St. William lived at Monte Vergine until the brethren began to murmur against him, saying that the life was too austere, that he gave too much in alms, and so on. He therefore decided to leave Monte Vergine and thus take away from the monks the cause of their grievances. Roger I of Naples took him under his patronage, and the saint founded many monasteries, both of men and of women, in that kingdom. So edified was the king with the saint’s sanctity of life and the wisdom of his counsels that, in order to have him always near him, he built a monastery opposite his palace at Salerno. Knowing by special revelation that his end was at hand, William retired to his monastery of Gugieto, where he died, and was buried in the church.

Acta SS., V June, 112; VI June, 259; RENDA, Vita. . .S. Gulielmi (Naples, 1591).

Paul Brookfield (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Simon de Montfort

An Earl of Leicester, date of birth unknown, died at Toulouse, 25 June, 1218. Simon (IV) de Montfort was descended from the lords of Montfort l’Amaury in Normandy, being the second son of Simon (III), and Amicia, daughter of Robert de Beaumont, third Earl of Leicester. Having succeeded his father as Baron de Montfort in 1181, in 1190 he married Alice de Montmorency, the daughter of Bouchard (III) de Montmorency. In 1199 while taking part in a tournament at Ecry-sur-Aisne in the province of Champagne he heard Fulk de Neuilly preaching the crusade, and in company with Count Thibaud de Champagne and many other nobles and knights he took the cross. Unfortunately, the crusade got out of control, and the French knights, instead of co-operating with the pope, decided on a campaign in Egypt, and on their arrival at Venice entered on a contract for transport across the Mediterranean. Being unable to fulfill the terms of the contract, they compounded by assisting the Venetians to capture Zara in Dalmatia. In vain the pope urged them to set out for the Holy Land. They preferred to march on Constantinople, though Simon de Montfort offered energetic opposition to this proposal. Notwithstanding his efforts, the expedition was undertaken and the pope’s plans were defeated…

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St. Juliana Falconieri

Born in 1270; died 12 June, 1341. Juliana belonged to the noble Florentine family of Falconieri. Her uncle, St. Alexis Falconieri, was one of the seven founders of the Servite Order. Through his influence she also consecrated herself from her earliest youth to the religious life and the practices of Christian perfection. After her father’s death she received about A.D. 1285 from St. Philip Benitius, then General of the Servites, the habit of the Third Order, of which she became the foundress. Until her mother’s death she remained in her parents’ house, where she followed the rule given her by St. Philip Benitius, practicing perfect chastity, strict mortification, severe penance, zealous prayer, and works of Christian charity…

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Herbert Vaughan

Cardinal, and third Archbishop of Westminster; b. at Gloucester, 15 April, 1832; d. at St. Joseph’s College, Mill Hill, Middlesex, 19 June, 1903; he came of a family which had been true to the Catholic Faith all through the ages of the persecution. Its members had suffered for their faith in fines and imprisonment and double land taxes. Sometimes, too, they suffered for their politics. In the Civil War they sided with Charles I and were nearly ruined. After the Stuart rising in 1715, John Vaughan of Courtfield refused to take the oath of allegiance to the House of Hanover, and two years later his name appears in a list of “Popish Recusants Convict”. When “Prince Charlie” in 1745 raided south to Derby, two of the Vaughans rode back with him to Scotland, and fought by his side at Culloden. Driven into exile, both took service under the Spanish king, and the younger rose to the rank of field-marshal. The son of the elder brother, the great-great-grandfather of the cardinal, was allowed to come back to England and to resume possession of the family estates at Courtfield, in Herefordshire…

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June 19 – St. Jean-Louis Bonnard

June 18, 2018

Saint Jean-Louis Bonnard A French missionary and martyr, born 1 March, 1824 at Saint-Christôt-en-Jarret (Diocese of Lyons); beheaded 30 April, 1852. After a collegiate course at Saint Jodard, he entered the seminary of Lyons, which he left at the age of twenty two, to complete his theological studies at the Seminary of the Foreign Missions […]

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June 19 – Bl. Odo of Cambrai

June 18, 2018

Bl. Odo of Cambrai Bishop and confessor, also called ODOARDUS; born at Orleans, 1050; died at Anchin, 19 June, 1113. In 1087 he was invited by the canons of Tournai to teach in that city, and there soon won a great reputation. He became a Benedictine monk (1095) in St. Martin’s, Tournai, of which be […]

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June 19 – St. François-Isidore Gagelin

June 18, 2018

Saint François-Isidore Gagelin (10 May 1799 – 17 October 1833) was a French missionary of the Paris Foreign Missions Society in Vietnam. He became the first French martyr of the 19th century in Vietnam. He was born in Montperreux, Doubs. He left for Vietnam in 1821. In 1826, when Emperor Minh Mạng ordered all missionaries […]

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June 19 – Execution of second group of those who believed in the religious exemption, but only at first

June 18, 2018

Carthusian Martyrs – the Second Group After little more than a month after the first group, it was the turn of three leading monks of the London house: Doms Humphrey Middlemore, William Exmew and Sebastian Newdigate, who were to die at Tyburn, London on the 19 June. Newdigate was a personal friend of Henry VIII, […]

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June 20 – The Pope Who Was the Son of Another Pope, Also a Saint

June 18, 2018

Pope St. Silverius (Reigned 536-37). Dates of birth and death unknown. He was the son of Pope [St.] Hormisdas who had been married before becoming one of the higher clergy. Silverius entered the service of the Church and was subdeacon at Rome when Pope Agapetus died at Constantinople, 22 April, 536. The Empress Theodora, who […]

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June 21 – He Was More Angel than Man

June 18, 2018

St. Aloysius Gonzaga Aloysius Gonzaga was son of Ferdinand Gonzaga, prince of the holy empire, and marquis of Castiglione, removed in the third degree of kindred from the duke of Mantua. His mother was Martha Tana Santena, daughter of Tanus Santena, lord of Cherry, in Piedmont. She was lady of honor to Isabel, the wife […]

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The Conversion of Alphonse Ratisbonne

June 14, 2018

By Armando Santos Alphonse Ratisbonne was a young Jew from a family of well-established bankers in Strasbourg, France. He also was socially prominent due to his wealth and blood-ties to the Rothchilds. In 1827, Alphonse’s older brother, Thèodore, converted to Catholicism and entered the priesthood, thus breaking with his family whose hopes now lay in […]

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Egalitarianism and God’s Order for the Universe

June 14, 2018

by Prof. Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira In previous lectures, I considered the problem of equality in two very distinct parts: 1) There is an egalitarian Revolution in the universe, which aims to establish equality as an ideal, that is to say, equality for the sake of equality must be attained, and inequality for inequality’s sake […]

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June 15 – Magna Carta

June 14, 2018

Magna Carta The charter of liberties granted by King John of England in 1215 and confirmed with modifications by Henry III in 1216, 1217, and 1225. The Magna Carta has long been considered by the English-speaking peoples as the earliest of the great constitutional documents which give the history of England so unique a character; […]

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June 15 – The Northern Crusades

June 14, 2018

The Battle of Lyndanisse was a battle which helped King Valdemar II of Denmark establish the territory of Danish Estonia during the Northern Crusades. Valdemar II defeated the Estonians at Lyndanisse (Estonian: Lindanise), during the Northern Crusades, by orders from the Pope. The Battle Valdemar II, along with Archbishop Anders Sunesen of Lund, Bishop Theoderik […]

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June 15 – St. Bernard dogs carry his name

June 14, 2018

St. Bernard of Menthon Born in 923, probably in the castle Menthon near Annecy, in Savoy; died at Novara, 1008. He was descended from a rich, noble family and received a thorough education. He refused to enter an honorable marriage proposed by his father and decided to devote himself to the service of the Church. […]

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June 16 – Pope Innocent III

June 14, 2018

(Lotario de’ Conti) One of the greatest popes of the Middle Ages, son of Count Trasimund of Segni and nephew of Clement III, born 1160 or 1161 at Anagni, and died 16 June, 1216, at Perugia. He received his early education at Rome, studied theology at Paris, jurisprudence at Bologna, and became a learned theologian […]

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June 16 – Death threats meant nothing to him

June 14, 2018

Saint John Francis Regis Born 31 January, 1597, in the village of Fontcouverte (department of Aude); died at la Louvesc, 30 Dec., 1640. His father Jean, a rich merchant, had been recently ennobled in recognition of the prominent part he had taken in the Wars of the League; his mother, Marguerite de Cugunhan, belonged by […]

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June 17 – Sobieski

June 14, 2018

John III Sobieski (Polish: Jan III Sobieski, Lithuanian: Jonas Sobieskis; 17 August 1629 – 17 June 1696) Born at Olesko in 1629; died at Wilanow, 1696; son of James, Castellan of Cracow and descended by his mother from the heroic Zolkiewski, who died in battle at Cecora. His elder brother Mark was his companion in […]

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June 17 – Founder of the Albertines

June 14, 2018

Saint Brother Albert Chmielowski In Igołomia, on the outskirts of Cracow (Poland), the noble family of Adalbert Chmielowski and Josephine Borzysławska announced on August 20, 1845, the birth of their son Adam (Brother Albert). Mr Chmielowski together with his wife, raised their children in an atmosphere of patriotic ideals, strong faith in God and a […]

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June 17, 1793: Pius VI condemns the revolutionary concepts of liberty and equality

June 14, 2018

Pius VI repeatedly condemned the false concept of liberty and equality. In the Secret Consistory of June 17, 1793, quoting the words of the encyclical Inscrutabilie Divinae Sapientiae of December 25, 1775, he declared: “‘The most perfidious philosophers go farther. They dissolve all those bonds by which human beings are joined to one another and to […]

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June 18 – To make peace, she surrendered her son’s rights to the throne

June 14, 2018

Blessed Theresa of Portugal (born at Coimbra, October 4, 1178 – died at Lorvão, June 18, 1250) Queen of Léon as the first wife of King Alfonso IX of León. She was the oldest daughter of Sancho I of Portugal and Dulce of Aragon. Theresa was the mother to three of Alfonso’s children—two daughters and […]

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June 12 – He Crowned Charlemagne

June 11, 2018

Pope St. Leo III Date of birth unknown; died 816. He was elected on the very day his predecessor was buried (26 Dec., 795), and consecrated on the following day. It is quite possible that this haste may have been due to a desire on the part of the Romans to anticipate any interference of […]

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June 12 – A certain nobleman had a concubine

June 11, 2018

St. John of Sahagun Hermit, born 1419, at Sahagun (or San Fagondez) in the Kingdom of Leon, in Spain; died 11 June, 1479, at Salamanca; feast 12 June. In art he is represented holding a chalice and host surrounded by rays of light. John, the oldest of seven children, was born of pious and respected […]

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June 12 – Saint Guido of Acqui

June 11, 2018

Saint Guido of Acqui (also Wido) (c. 1004 – 12 June 1070) was Bishop of Acqui (now Acqui Terme) in north-west Italy from 1034 until his death. He was born around 1004 to a noble family of the area of Acqui, the Counts of Acquesana, in Melazzo where the family’s wealth was concentrated. He completed […]

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June 13 – He Lived Only 36 Years, But the Whole World Knows Him

June 11, 2018

St. Anthony of Padua Franciscan Thaumaturgist, born at Lisbon, 1195; died at Vercelli, 13 June, 1231. He received in baptism the name of Ferdinand. Later writers of the fifteenth century asserted that his father was Martin Bouillon, descendant of the renowned Godfrey de Bouillon, commander of the First Crusade, and his mother, Theresa Taveira, descendant […]

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June 14 – The entire population was slaughtered, except those who embraced Islam

June 11, 2018

Croia A titular see of Albania. Croia (pronounced Kruya, Albanian, “Spring”) stands on the site of Eriboea, a town mentioned by Ptolemy (III, xiii, 13, 41). Georgius Acropolites (lxix) mentions it as a fortress in 1251. A decree of the Venetian senate gave it in 1343 to Marco Barbarigo and his wife. In 1395 it […]

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Queen Elizabeth’s workload is 25% higher than last year

June 7, 2018

According to the Royal Central: Research conducted by royal journalist Patricia Treble of Write Royalty shows that Her Majesty has conducted more than 125 engagements so far in 2018 – a huge increase on the previous year. The Queen turned 92-years-old in April…and is still one of the most active members of The Royal Family. […]

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Popular Piety Sometimes Arouses Envy

June 7, 2018

John started from Madrid to embark at Barcelona on Wednesday, the 6th of June, 1571, at three o’clock in the afternoon. He was accompanied only by his Master of the Horse D. Luis de Córdoba, his gentleman D. Juan de Gúzman, the secretary Juan de Soto, the valet Jorge de Lima, a caterer, a cook, […]

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Letter of St. Catherine of Siena to Pope Gregory XI

June 7, 2018

In the Name of Jesus Christ crucified and of sweet Mary: Most holy and sweet father, your poor unworthy daughter Catherine in Christ sweet Jesus, commends herself to you in His precious Blood with desire to see you a manly man, free from any fear or fleshly love toward yourself, or toward any creature related […]

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June 8 – She did what St. Ignatius could not

June 7, 2018

Ven. Anne de Xainctonge Foundress of the Society of the Sisters of St. Ursula of the Blessed Virgin, born at Dijon, 21 November, 1567; died at Dôle, 8 June, 1621. She was the daughter of Jean de Xainctonge, councillor in the Dijon Parliament, and of Lady Marguerite Collard, both of noble birth and virtuous life. […]

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June 8 – Accused of theft and other misconduct

June 7, 2018

St. William of York (WILLIAM FITZHERBERT, also called WILLIAM OF THWAYT). Archbishop of York. Tradition represents him as nephew of King Stephen, whose sister Emma was believed to have married Herbert of Winchester, treasurer to Henry I. William became a priest, and about 1130 he was canon and treasurer of York. In 1142 he was […]

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June 8 – The Noble Countess Who Dedicated Her Life to Bringing Dissolute Women to Repentance

June 7, 2018

Blessed Mary of the Divine Heart (died in Porto, Portugal, June 8, 1899), born Maria Droste zu Vischering, was a noble of Germany and Roman Catholic nun best known for influencing Pope Leo XIII’s consecration of the world to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Pope Leo XIII called this consecration “the greatest act of my […]

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June 9 – St. Columba

June 7, 2018

St. Columba Abbot of Iona, born at Garten, County Donegal, Ireland, 7 December, 521; died 9 June, 597. He belonged to the Clan O’Donnell, and was of royal descent. His father’s name was Fedhlimdh and that of his mother Eithne. On his father’s side he was great-great-grandson of Niall of the Nine Hostages, an Irish […]

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June 9 – A simple palace servant, God confided to her the destiny of nations

June 7, 2018

Blessed Anna Maria Gesualda Antonia Taigi (Maiden name Giannetti.) Venerable Servant of God, born at Siena, Italy, 29 May, 1769; died at Rome, 9 June, 1837. Her parents, Luigi Giannetti and Maria Masi, kept an apothecary shop at Siena, but lost all their fortune and were obliged to go to Rome in search of a […]

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June 9 – Apostle of Brazil

June 7, 2018

St. Joseph Anchieta A famous Jesuit missionary, commonly known as the Apostle of Brazil, born on the Island of Tenerife, in 1553, of noble family; died in Brazil, 1596. After studying in Coimbra, he entered the Society of Jesus, at the age of seventeen, and when a novice nearly ruined his health by his excessive […]

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June 10 – Anti-pagan Renaissance Saint

June 7, 2018

Bl. Giovanni Dominici (BANCHINI or BACCHINI was his family name). Cardinal, statesman and writer, born at Florence, 1356; died at Buda, 10 July, 1420. He entered the Dominican Order at Santa Maria Novella in 1372 after having been cured, through the intercession of St. Catherine of Siena, of an impediment of speech for which he […]

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June 10 – Most Sublime Figure of Portuguese Literature

June 7, 2018

Luis Vaz de Camões (OR CAMOENS) Born in 1524 or 1525; died 10 June, 1580. The most sublime figure in the history of Portuguese literature, Camões owes his lasting fame to his epic poem “Os Lusiadas,” (The Lusiads); he is remarkable also for the degree of art attained in his lyrics, less noteworthy for his […]

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June 11 – Blessed Ignatius Maloyan

June 7, 2018

Ignatius Maloyan (Shoukrallah), son of Melkon and Faridé, was born in 1869, in Mardin, Turkey. His parish priest, noticed in him signs of a priestly vocation, so he sent him to the convent of Bzommar-Lebanon; he was fourteen years old. After finishing his superior studies in 1896, the day dedicated to the Sacred Heart of […]

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June 11 – St. Godeberta

June 7, 2018

St. Godeberta Born about the year 640, at Boves, a few leagues from Amiens, in France; died about the beginning of the eighth century, at Noyon (Oise), the ancient Noviomagus. She was very carefully educated, her parents being of noble rank and attached to the court of King Clovis II. When the question of her […]

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June 5 – Friendship is tested in adversity

June 4, 2018

Blessed Ferdinand of Portugal Prince of Portugal, born in Portugal, 29 September, 1402; died at Fez, in Morocco, 5 June, 1443. He was one of five sons, his mother being Philippa, daughter of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, and his father King John I, known in history for his victories over the Moors and […]

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June 5 – My God Is Greater Than Your Tree

June 4, 2018

St. Boniface (WINFRID, WYNFRITH). Apostle of Germany, date of birth unknown; martyred 5 June, 755 (754); emblems: the oak, axe, book, fox, scourge, fountain, raven, sword. He was a native of England, though some authorities have claimed him for Ireland or Scotland. The place of his birth is not known, though it was probably the […]

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June 5 – Genesius, Count of Clermont

June 4, 2018

Genesius, Count of Clermont Died 725. Feast, 5 June. According to the lessons of the Breviary of the Chapter of Camaleria (Acta SS. June, I, 497), he was of noble birth; his father’s name is given as Audastrius, and his mother’s is Tranquilla. Even in his youth he is said to have wrought miracles—to have […]

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June 5 – Franciscan preacher of crusade

June 4, 2018

Bl. Pacificus of Ceredano (Also known as Pacificus of Novara, or Novariensis). Born 1420 at Cerano, in the Diocese of Novara in Lombardy, supposedly of the much respected family of Ramati; died 14 June, 1482. He entered the Franciscan Order of Observants at Novara in 1445. After his ordination, he was employed in preaching, in […]

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June 5 – Classmate of the Emperor

June 4, 2018

James of Edessa A celebrated Syrian writer, b. most likely in A.D. 633; d. 5 June, 708. He was a native of the village of `En-debha, in the district of Gumyah, in the province of Antioch. During several years he studied Greek and Holy Writ at the famous convent of Kennesrhe, on the left bank […]

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