Karl Rudolf Gerd von Rundstedt, Field Marshal in the Wehrmacht of Nazi Germany during World War II. Photo part of the German Federal Archives.

Less famous than the near-legendary Erwin Rommel, Field Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt was nevertheless one of the most formidable of Germany’s generals of World War II, mastermind of the daring Ardennes Offensive—the “Battle of the Bulge”—which inflicted on the American army the heaviest losses it suffered in Europe before General George S. Patton, Jr. succeeded in pounding the offensive into absolute defeat. Captured at the end of the war and asked to name the American commander who had most impressed him, Runstedt did not pause before he snapped back: “Patton was your best.”

The 1st Battalion of the U.S. 26th Infantry Regiment passing through the railway viaduct north of Bütgenbach, Belgium. The railway viaduct was part of the line running from Losheim/Eifel (Germany) to Trois-Ponts, Belgium, and had been blown up by the retreating German troops. (From the Battle of the Bulge.)

In Patton, the American army had precisely the kind of general the Germans most desperately wanted for themselves, a brilliant, innovative, and daring master of modern tactics who possessed the powerfully charismatic soul of an ancient warrior. Carlo D’Este put it into the title of his 1996 biography of the general: Patton had a “genius for war.”…

In the very midst of the great Allied eastward drive, Rundstedt launched the Ardennes offensive during the Christmas season of 1944, hitting the American line at its weakest point and threatening to split the Allied forces in two with an all-out advance targeting the crucial Allied-held port of Antwerp. Patton performed a miracle of tactics, logistics, and human endurance when he turned the bulk of his army, troops exhausted by three months of continual battle and advance, ninety degrees north to launch a bold counterattack into the southern flank of the German advance. The Battle of the Bulge, which began as a stunning catastrophe for the Allies, was converted into a U.S. victory that broke the back of the German army.

Alan Axelrod, Patton’s Drive: The Making of America’s Greatest General (Guilford, Conn.: The Lyons Press, 2009), x, xii-xiii.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 574

 

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By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

K-Dog, a Bottlenose dolphin belonging to Commander Task Unit, leaps out of the water in front of Sgt. Andrew Garrett while training near the USS Gunston Hall in the Persian Gulf. K-Dog, is on a mineclearance operation, with a “pinger” device attached to the dolphin’s pectoral fin.

The 21st century knight must be attentive and suspicious in the smallest things: Suspicious even in the apex of victory. It will appear as if the Revolution had such a defeat that there is no point even thinking about a Counter-Revolution; the optimists will lie down and rest. The day the first optimist lies down to rest, the Revolution will be able to stick its head out again. That’s the way it is.

So what’s the end result? What will the 21st knights have to be? They will have to be the men dedicated to this task par excellence.

Two Marines of the 26th Marines probe for enemy mines buried in a rice paddy dike, 13 miles southwest of Da Nang.

We cannot imagine that a whole country will dedicate itself to this task except if there are a handful of men who are so excellent at it that they set the example to all others. And we should be these men!

 

(Excerpt from a Tea, Monday, Sept. 11, 1989 – Nobility.org translation)

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St. Robert of Molesme

Born about the year 1029, at Champagne, France, of noble parents who bore the names of Thierry and Ermengarde; died at Molesme, 17 April, 1111.

Statue of St Robert of Molesme in Germany

Statue of St Robert of Molesme in Germany

When fifteen years of age, he commenced his novitiate in the Abbey of Montier-la-Celle, or St. Pierre-la-Celle, situated near Troyes, of which he became later prior. In 1068 he succeeded Hunaut II as Abbot of St. Michael de Tonnerre, in the Diocese of Langres.

About this time a band of seven anchorites who lived in the forest of Collan, in the same diocese, sought to have Robert for their chief, but the monks, despite their constant resistance to his authority, insisted on keeping their abbot who enjoyed so great a reputation, and was the ornament of their house. Their intrigues determined Robert to resign his charge in 1071, and seek refuge in the monastery of Montier-la-Celle. The same year he was placed over the priory of St. Ayoul de Provins, which depended on Montier-la-Celle. Meantime two of the hermits of Collan went to Rome and besought Gregory VII…

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Saint Hugh the Great

Abbot of Cluny, born at Semur (Brionnais in the Diocese of Autun), 1024; died at Cluny, 28 April, 1109.

His early life

The eldest son of Count Dalmatius of Semur and Aremberge (Aremburgis) of Vergy, Hugh was descended from the noblest families in Burgundy. Dalmatius, devoted to war and the chase, desired that Hugh should adopt the knightly calling and succeed to the ancestral estates; his mother, however, influenced it is said by a vision vouchsafed to a priest whom she consulted, wished her son to dedicate himself to the service of God. From his earliest years Hugh gave indication of such extraordinary earnestness and piety that his father, recognizing his evident aversion from the so-called gentle pursuits, entrusted him to his…

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Today in History

Archduke Karl with his staff. Color print by Felician Myrbach

– April 30th, 1847 – Archduke Charles of Austria, Duke of Teschen

Archduke Charles (full name in German: Karl Ludwig Johann Joseph Lorenz)
of Austria was born on September 5th. 1771 in Florence
(then the Grand Duchy of Tuscany).

His parents were Leopold II, Holy Roman Emperor and Infanta Maria Luisa of Spain.

The family of Archduke Charles of Austria, painting by
Johann Ender

In 1815 he married Princess Henrietta of Nassau-Weilburg. They had 7 children.

Archduke Charles of Austria began his military service in the wars of the French
Revolution. He commanded a Brigade at the Battle of Jemappes (1792). In 1806
he became a field marshal. Archduke Charles of Austria was noted as one of the
best generals of Europe.

He died in Vienna on April 30th. 1847.

h/t: All About Royal Families

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Pope Saint Pius V

Born at Bosco, near Alexandria, Lombardy, 17 Jan., 1504 elected 7 Jan., 1566; died 1 May, 1572. Being of a poor though noble family his lot would have been to follow a trade, but he was taken in by the Dominicans of Voghera, where he received a good education and was trained in the way of solid and austere piety. He entered the order, was ordained in 1528, and taught theology and philosophy for sixteen years. In the meantime he was master of novices and was on several occasions elected prior of different houses of his order in which he strove to develop the practice of the monastic virtues and spread the spirit of the holy founder. He himself was an example to all. He fasted, did penance, passed long hours of the night in meditation and prayer, traveled on foot without a cloak in deep silence, or only speaking to his companions of the things of God. In 1556 he was made Bishop of Sutri by Paul IV. His zeal against heresy caused him…

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This saint was son of Gondebald, the Arian king of the Burgundians; but embraced the Catholic faith through the instructions of St. Alcimus Avitus, bishop of Vienne. (1) He succeeded to the kingdom of his father in 516, and in the midst of barbarism lived humble, mortified, penitent, devout, and charitable, even on the throne; a station in which the very name of true virtue is too often scarcely known. Before the death of his father, he built the famous monastery of St. Maurice at Agaune, in the Valais, in the year 515, where many holy hermits lived before that time in scattered cells.—God permitted this good prince to fall into a snare. He suffered his son Sigeric to be put to death, upon an accusation forged by his second wife, of a conspiracy against his life: but afterwards discovering the calumny, and pierced to the quick with remorse, he retired to Agaune, where…

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April 25 – Builder

April 24, 2017

Blessed Meinwerk

Tenth Bishop of Paderborn, d. 1036: Meinwerk (Meginwerk) was born of the noble family of the Immedinger and related to the royal house of Saxony.

His father was Imad (Immeth), Count of Teisterbant and Radichen, and his mother’s name was Adela (Adala, Athela). In early youth he was dedicated by his parents to serve God in the priesthood. He began his secular and ecclesiastical studies at the church of St. Stephen in Halberstadt and finished them at the cathedral school of Hildesheim, where he had as schoolmate St. Bernward of Hildesheim and probably the later Emperor Henry II. After his ordination he became…

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Our Lady of Good Counsel

January of 1467 saw the death of the last great Albanian leader, George Castriota, better known as Scanderbeg. Raised by an Albanian chief, he placed himself at the head of his own people.

Subsequently, Scanderbeg inflicted stunning defeats on the Turkish army and occupied fortresses all over Albania.

With Scanderbeg’s death, the Turkish army, finally free from the Fulminating Lion of War, poured into Albania, occupying all its fortresses, cities and provinces with the exception of Scutari, in the north of the country…

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St. Rafael Arnáiz Barón

(9 April 1911, Burgos, Spain – 26 April 1938, Dueñas, Palencia, Spain)

Rafael Arnáiz, known in the monastery as Brother María Rafael, was born on 9 April 1911 in the city of Burgos, in north-central Spain. He was the first of four sons born to a well-to-do, deeply Christian and Catholic family. As a boy he went to several schools run by the Jesuit Fathers. By the time of his adolescence it became clear that Rafael had special human, intellectual, artistic and spiritual gifts. These qualities were remarkably well balanced in him, producing an open, positive, joyful attitude to the world of persons and things, characterized by exuberant good humor, respect and humility…

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Pope St. Cletus

This name is only another form for Anacletus, the second successor of St. Peter. It is true that the Liberian Catalogue, a fourth-century list of popes, so called because it ends with Pope Liberius (d. 366), contains both names, as if they were different persons. But this is an error, owing evidently to the existence of two forms of the same name, one an abbreviation of the other. In the aforesaid catalogue the papal succession is: Petrus, Linus, Clemens, Cletus, Anacletus. This catalogue, however, is the only authority previous to the sixth century (Liber Pontificalis) for distinguishing two popes under the names of Cletus and Anacletus…

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St. Zita

Painting of St. Zita by Arnould de Vuez and photographed by Velvet at the Hospice Comtesse.

Model and heavenly patroness of domestic servants, born early in the thirteenth century of a poor family at Montsegradi, a little village near Lucca, in Tuscany; died at Lucca, 27 April, 1271. A naturally happy disposition and the teaching of a virtuous mother, aided by Divine grace, developed in the child’s soul that sweetness and modesty of character and continual and conscientious application to work which constituted her especial virtues. At the age of twelve she entered the service of the Fatinelli family of Lucca. Her piety and the exactitude with which she discharged her domestic duties, in which she regarded herself as serving God rather than man, even supplying the deficiencies of her fellow servants, far from gaining for her their love and esteem and that of her employers rather brought upon her every manner of ill-treatment of both the former and, through their accusations, of the latter. The incessant ill-usage, however, was powerless to deprive her of her inward peace, her love of those who wronged her, and her respect for her employers. By this meek and humble self-restraint she at last succeeded in overcoming the malice of her fellow-servants and her employers, so much so that she was placed in charge of all the affairs of the house.

In her position of command over all the servants she treated all with kindness, not exacting from them any reckoning for the wrongs she had for so many years suffered from them. She was always circumspect, and only severe when there was a question of checking the introduction of vice among the servants. On the other hand, if any of them had been guilty of shortcomings, she took upon herself to excuse or defend them to their employers. Using the ample authority given her by her employers, she was generous in almsgiving, but careful to assist only those really in need. After her death numerous miracles were wrought at her intercession, so that she came to be venerated as a saint in the neighbourhood of Lucca, and the poets Fazio degli Uberti (Dittamonde, III, 6) and Dante (Inferno, XI, 38) both designate the city of Lucca simply as “Santa Zita”. The office in her honour was approved by Leo X.

Miracle of St Zita by Bernardo Strozzi.

In 1580 her tomb was discovered in the Church of S. Frediano; thus was suggested the solemn approbation of her cult, which was granted by Innocent XII in 1696. The earliest biography of the saint is preserved in an anonymous manuscript belonging to the Fatinelli family which was published at Ferrara in 1688 by Monsignor Fatinelli, “Vita beatf Zitf virginis Lucensis ex vetustissimo codice manuscripto fideliter transumpta”. For his fuller “Vita e miracoli di S. Zita vergine lucchese” (Lucca, 1752) Bartolomeo Fiorito has used this and other notices, especially those taken from the process drawn up to prove the immemorial cult.

U. BENIGNI (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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St. Peter Armengol was born in Guárdia dels Prats, a small village in the archdiocese of Tarragon, Spain in 1238. He belonged to the house of the barons of Rocafort, descendants of the counts of Urgel, whose ancestors were directly linked to the counts of Barcelona and the monarchs of Aragon and Castile.

The emblem of Mercedarians (Order of Our Lady of Mercy).

The emblem of Mercedarians (Order of Our Lady of Mercy).

From Brigand to Convert
Despite the great care taken by his parents regarding his education, young Peter gave himself over to a life of total dissipation in the company of other dissolute youths who led him on the wide road of vice and caprice. “Abyssus abyssum invocat” – deep calleth on deep – say the Scriptures. Thus Peter joined a gang of criminals who, pursued by justice, led the life of bandits in the mountains. Soon the young Armengol became the leader of that gang…

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According to The Royal Forums:

Spain’s Infanta Pilar, Duchess of Badajoz, assisted in the procession of the Jesus Christ of the Alabarderos yesterday, Good Friday.

The statue of Jesus Christ of the Alabarderos is carried through the streets of Madrid by 44 individuals, accompanied by fife and drum players from the military band.

The Infanta was given the task of setting the procession off from the Puerta del Príncipe of the Royal Palace in Madrid. Her niece, Infanta Elena, usually performs the task in her role as Honorary Senior Sister of the Congregation. Infanta Pilar’s daughter, Simoneta Gómez-Acebo, also attended the event.

To read the entire article in The Royal Forums, please click here.

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According to the Luxemburger Wort:

It was in 1418 the building was mentioned in official documents for the first time as the town hall, however just over a century later, the building and much of Luxembourg city was destroyed when lightning struck the Church of the Franciscan monks and ignited a stockpile gunpowder stored in the basement.

The explosion was powerful enough to set the town hall and many other buildings alight.

As if the turbulent past wasn’t enough, the palace was converted into a concert hall and tavern by the Nazis during the Second World War.

To read the entire article in the Luxemburger Wort, please click here.

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According to Royal Central:

…the Crown Prince of Iran, Reza Pahlavi has now called for a monarchist revolution in his birth country of Iran and calls for Trump and American help to transform the dictatorship to a parliamentarian monarchy.

It should be said that the Crown Prince wants to have a peaceful revolution that will be carried out by the Iranian people, and he does not envision an armed revolution with foreign military troops on the ground. Asked how his envisioned peaceful revolution could play out in Iran, Pahlavi said it would need to begin with the labour unions starting a nationwide strike.

To read the entire article on Royal Central, please click here.

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The Fate of Greed

April 20, 2017

When Christopher Columbus arrived in Hispaniola, August 1498, he found open rebellion and treachery. While Columbus, on his part, was struggling with unwearied energy to repress the calamities that were destroying the colony, and by enormous sacrifice and humiliation, in fear and anxiety, succeeding in restoring some order in Hispaniola, and preparing better days to come; his enemies in Spain made use of these calamities, and by this means finally succeeded in the war they had carried on for so many years against him.
When word reached King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of the chaos in Hispaniola, they decided to send an emissary to investigate. Unknowing to their Majesties, the one they sent was a greedy and envious enemy of Columbus. Arriving in San Domingo harbor, he immediately put Columbus into chains and released the traitors.

There can be no doubt, but that when a decision was to be made in regard to the affairs of the Indies, the enemies of Columbus assailed the Queen with every artifice and intrigue to secure a decision unfavorable to the admiral. The appointment of Don Francisco Bobadilla proves this. His subsequent cruelty and perfidy towards the admiral show plainly that he was either a tool of his most violent enemies, or else one of their numbers. It is impossible that a man, without previous feeling, could so shamelessly abuse his authority and suddenly change from a judge to a violent persecutor.

After six weeks in Spain, Columbus, freed of any wrong doing, was released by the Sovereigns and given commission for another voyage. Ordering Bobadilla to collect what was due to Columbus, by trade and mining of gold and to give these into the custody of Columbus’s designated agent. On March 14, 1502, with orders forbidding Columbus to stop at Hispaniola, Columbus embarked with four caravels and arrived later off of Hispaniola on June 29, 1502.

 

In accordance with the orders of the sovereigns, the first intention of Columbus was to steer directly to the land of Paria, and follow the coast till he came to the Strait, which he felt sure must be further on towards the west. But he was obliged to change his plan, because his largest vessel, not having the masts sunk deep enough in the keel, could not support the sails when spread, and the other vessels were delayed to keep her company. He, therefore, decided to touch at San Domingo to exchange this vessel for one of those which Nicolas de Ovando had lately brought out, or else to purchase another. This seemed to him so reasonable as to be safe from suspicion or blame. Ovando had arrived at San Domingo on the 15th of April. On the arrival of the new governor, all Bobadilla’s importance vanished.

Don Francisco Bobadilla

Solitary and neglected, deserted by the very persons he had favored the most, he experienced in his own case the fickleness of the popularity gained by flattering the vices of the multitude. But a strict investigation was made of Roldan and his companions, and most of them were ordered to Spain to answer for what they had done. None of them seemed uneasy about his fate, relying on the influence of their friends to protect them at court, and on Fonseca, who they knew was ready to defend any one who had shown himself hostile to the admiral. They also knew that the great quantities of gold they had collected would remove any danger that threatened.

All these [wealth] were to be sent back to Spain in the ships that brought Ovando to Hispaniola. Bobadilla took passage on the largest of the vessels, with an immense quantity of gold, the proceeds of the Crown revenues under his administration, which he confidently expected would cover every fault that might be found with his conduct. Roldan and his principal confederates were embarked on the same ship, so that with the gold intended for the Crown, and that which Bobadilla, Roldan, and the other chiefs of the revolt put on board as their private property, there was on the flag-ship the largest amount of gold that had ever been got together. But the greatest marvel was an enormous piece of virgin gold, famous in the old Spanish chronicles, and the largest that had yet been found.

By order of Bobadilla, Alonzo Sanchez de Carvajal, was in charge of the flimsy and smallest ship, Aguja, taking with him 4,000 pieces of gold that he had collected, belonging to Christopher Columbus— partly revenues collected since Columbus’s arrival, and partly what Bobadilla had been compelled to restore. It was the hope that Columbus’ gold on board the Aguja, would sink on it’s trip back to Spain.

Christopher Columbus in chains by Baron Gustave Wappers.

The preparations were all made, and the fleet ready to sail, when, on the 29th of June, the little squadron of Columbus appeared off  San Domingo. Columbus sent Pedro di Tereros, captain of one of the caravels, on shore, to inform Ovando of the need he had of changing one of his vessels, and to ask, at the same time, for permission to come into the harbor for shelter from a violent hurricane which Columbus saw, from various signs, would soon be upon them. Ovando refused both requests.

Columbus was deeply hurt at his repulse. “Who,” he wrote soon after to their Majesties, “who, not even excepting Job, would not have died of despair to see, when my safety and that of my son, my brother, and my other friends, was at stake, under these circumstances, access forbidden me to that land, and shelter in that port, which by the will of God and at the price of my blood I had won for Spain?”

But, in spite of his indignation, Columbus was anxious about the certain danger to which he saw the fleet, about to sail, would be exposed. He, therefore, sent Tereros back to entreat the governor not to let the fleet weigh anchor, assuring him that he saw sure indications of the approach of a frightful hurricane, and woe to the ships that should be caught at that moment at sea, and exposed to the fury of the winds and the rage of the Ocean.

Map showing location of Mona Passage

But they saw no signs of any danger, and seamen and pilots were impatient to start. Columbus’s predictions were scoffed at, and he was ridiculed as a false prophet.

Columbus, finding that his attempts to save those imprudent men were idle, and certain, from his long experience in observing the natural phenomena of those regions, that the hurricane was imminent, and would come from the land side, kept as close as possible to the shore, seeking for some bay or deserted river to shelter his little squadron. His men were discouraged and astounded at finding themselves excluded from a port of their own country, where even strangers, under like circumstances, would not be refused hospitality and shelter. They complained of their misfortune in sailing with a captain who seemed excluded from common justice, and anticipated nothing but evil on a voyage on which the sea persecuted them with constant dangers, and the land refused them protection or shelter.

Twelve of 13 ships that were part of Cabral’s fleet are depicted. Many were lost, as can be seen in this drawing from Memória das Armadas, c.1568

In the mean time, Bobadilla’s beautiful fleet of twenty-eight sail, with songs and music, left the safe harbor and sailed boldly out on the open sea. Sailing from Ozama and made for the Mona Passage, which is the Strait between Hispaniola and Puerto Rico that connects the Caribbean to the Atlantic. Columbus wrote, “The storm was terrible and on that night the ships were parted from me. Each one lost.” Columbus had instructed his convoy that if they should become separated, they should meet in the harbor on Ocoa Bay after the storm. His entire fleet arrived safely in Ocoa Bay on Sunday, July 3rd .

As for Bobadilla  and his thirty-ship fleet…

As they reached the eastern extremity of Hispaniola, the signs that precede a storm were manifest to every one, but the open menace was so quickly followed by the act, that the fleet had no time to seek shelter from the wrath of the sea, or to reach the open ocean and avoid the rocks near the shore. The tempest that burst on them was one of those tremendous hurricanes that sometimes gather up in tropical latitudes. The hurricane caught the convoy in the Mona Passage head on.  The flag-ship, on which were Bobadilla, Roldan, and the rest of Columbus’s most bitter enemies, was one of the first to feel the eye of the hurricane, and, driven on a rock, went down with all on board. The others, after a more or less desperate struggle for life, were broken or sunk. Three got back to San Domingo in a pitiable condition. In all, five hundred mariners perished.

Whilst Bobadilla’s fleet met with a fate unparalleled in history, smallest of all the fleet, the Aguja, carrying Columbus’s gold, came through unharmed and she crossed the Ocean, blessing God, arriving in Spain without the loss of a man or a thing.

Francesco Tarducci, The Life of Christopher Columbus, (Detroit: H. F. Brownson, Publisher, 1890), Vol. 2, pp. 227, 229, 230-232.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 573

 

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By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

I believed yesterday I said here – if not I will do it in two words – that with the Revolution, iniquity and evil became much more refined; and that after the immense sin, evil became much worse than it was before that sin. And that, for this reason, that occasion already required the existence of knights much more knightly than at the time of Roland.

Now, why did evil refine itself? Was it because it had more valiant fighters and more competent generals at its service?

This is something that can be discussed. I don’t believe it had more valiant fighters, but probably more competent generals; because just as the whole culture and civilization gradually developed in time, so did military art. We can conclude that military art grew a lot. But chivalry did not.

François-Athanase de Charette de La Contrie

François-Athanase de Charette de La Contrie

What is a knight? It is a Catholic warrior in the splendor of his virtue, in the splendor of his whole capacity etc.: this is the true knight.

So, the first point is: the knights disappeared.

Second point, warfare was transformed. The Revolution works much more on people’s minds than through bullets; it does much more by rotting people’s characters than by conquering with bullets. For example, the revolutionary evil wreaked by television in one single evening is incomparably worse than the damage a whole crusader army could do!

A 13mm cartridge for a Mauser T-Gewehr Model 1918.

On the other hand, it’s no use repressing television by force, because they will make another, clandestine type of television, this will rise again. In other words, one needs to win the battles of the spirit.

And the battles of the spirit require fighters in this struggle to have all the finesse, penetration, prophetic spirit and grit to fight and win this spiritual combat! But this supposes much greater dedication and much more self-giving than a regular warrior must have. Because a warrior goes to war, returns from war, lies in bed and waits for another battle.

People watching and enjoying a live Cricket match, on a small television, setup specially on a roadside -just to watch the match between India and Pakistan. Photo by Arvind Jain.

Not here. Night and day, night and day…

A man goes to the store to buy a small box of paper clips to put on his desk. The clips on offer may have a certain revolutionary influence. He must refuse them. He goes to another store to buy a pair of shoes; he has to make sure they are not revolutionary. A person goes by and greets him: he has to see whether that greeting was not revolutionary. He must be able to see the meaning of Revolution in everything in order to perceive and reject the Revolution in everything. Because, if he does not do that, the Revolution enters and takes over the situation.

So, the 21st century knight, that is, the man of the Counter-Revolution in the 21st century – not in the 20th – has to be a man profoundly imbued with this spirit; has to have an unparalleled dedication to the counter-revolutionary cause; and he needs to see the Revolution and the Counter-Revolution at every moment and on every occasion. This has to be that way, there is no way out.

The cradle, painted by Johann Hermann Kretzschmer

If he fails to do this, he can say what he wants; but when he appears before God he will have left behind him all the open doors through which the Revolution entered.

Take, for example, the case of a father – as will happen in the Reign of Mary – with nine or ten children, a common fact. If he does not infuse this spirit in all his children, what grandchildren will he leave? And if a father slacks off, his son might become a colossus of the Revolution. How is he going to account for that? So you perceive that this supposes a penetration, a perspicacity of soul, a dedication and combativeness even greater than the warrior’s.

(Excerpt from a Tea, Monday, Sept. 11, 1989 – Nobility.org translation)

 

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St. Anselm

St. AnselmArchbishop of Canterbury, Doctor of the Church; born at Aosta a Burgundian town on the confines of Lombardy, died 21 April, 1109.

His father, Gundulf, was a Lombard who had become a citizen of Aosta, and his mother, Ermenberga, came of an old Burgundian family. Like many other saints, Anselm learnt the first lessons of piety from his mother, and at a very early age he was fired with the love of learning. In after life he still cherished the memories of childhood, and his biographer, Eadmer, has preserved some incidents which he had learnt from the saint’s own lips. The child had heard his mother speak of God, Who dwelt on high ruling all things. Living in the mountains, he thought that Heaven must be on their lofty summits. “And while he often revolved these matters in his mind, it chanced that one night he saw in a vision that he must go up to the summit of the mountain and hasten to the court of God, the great King. But before he began to ascend…

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St. Leonidas

(Or LEONIDES.)

The Roman Martyrology records several feast days of martyrs of this name in different countries. Under date of 28 January there is a martyr called Leonides, a native of the Thebaid, whose death with several companions is supposed to have occurred during the Diocletian persecution (Acta SS., January, II, 832). Another Leonides appears on 2 September, in a long list of martyrs headed by a St. Diomedes. Together with a St. Eleutherius, a Leonides is honoured on 8 August. From other sources we know of a St. Leonidas, Bishop of Athens, who lived about the sixth century, and whose feast is celebrated on 15 April (“Acta SS.”, April, II, 378; “Bibliotheca hagiographica graeca”, 2nd ed., 137). Still another martyr of the name is honoured on 16 April, with Callistus, Charysius, and other companions (Acta SS., April, II, 402).

Origen Adamantius, the son of St. Leonides of Alexandria.

Origen Adamantius, the son of St. Leonides of Alexandria.

The best known of them all, however, is St. Leonides of Alexandria, father of the great Origen. From Eusebius (Hist. Eccles., VI, 1, 2) we learn that he died a martyr during the persecution under Septimius Severus in 202. He was condemned to death by the prefect of Egypt, Lactus, and beheaded. His property was confiscated. Leonides carefully cultivated the brilliant intellect of his son Origen from the latter’s childhood, and imparted to him the knowledge of Holy Scripture. The feast of St. Leonidas of Alexandria is celebrated on 22 April.

J.P. KIRSCH (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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April 22 – Cabral and the Discovery of Brazil

April 20, 2017

Pedralvarez Cabral (Pedro Alvarez.) A celebrated Portugese navigator, generally called the discoverer of Brazil, born probably around 1460; date of death uncertain. Very little is known concerning the life of Cabral. He was the third son of Fernao Cabral, Governor of Beira and Belmonte, and Isabel de Gouvea, and married Isabel de Castro, the daughter […]

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April 23 – The Original Knight in Shining Armor

April 20, 2017

St. George Martyr, patron of England, suffered at or near Lydda, also known as Diospolis, in Palestine, probably before the time of Constantine. According to the very careful investigation of the whole question recently instituted by Father Delehaye, the Bollandist, in the light of modern sources of information, the above statement sums up all that […]

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April 23 – Archbishop author of war-song

April 20, 2017

St. Adalbert of Bohemia Born 939 of a noble Bohemian family; died 997. He assumed the name of the Archbishop Adalbert (his name had been Wojtech), under whom he studied at Magdeburg. He became Bishop of Prague, whence he was obliged to flee on account of the enmity he had aroused by his efforts to […]

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April 24 – “I came to extirpate heresy, not to embrace it”

April 20, 2017

St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen Born in 1577, at Sigmaringen, Prussia, of which town his father Johannes Rey was burgomaster; died at Sevis, 24 April, 1622. On the paternal side he was of Flemish ancestry. He pursued his studies at the University of Freiburg in the Breisgau, and in 1604 became tutor to Wilhelm von Stotzingen, […]

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April 24 – Mother Mary Euphrasia Pelletier

April 20, 2017

Mother Mary Euphrasia Pelletier, foundress of the Sisters of Our Lady of Charity of the Good Shepherd and canonized May 2, 1940 by Pope Pius XII. The aim of this institute is to provide a shelter for girls and women of dissolute habits, who wish to do penance for their iniquities and to lead a […]

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April 18 – Blessed Marie de l’Incarnation

April 17, 2017

Bl. Marie de l’Incarnation Known also as Madame Acarie, foundress of the French Carmel, born in Paris, 1 February, 1566; died at Pontoise, April, 1618. By her family Barbara Avrillot belonged to the higher bourgeois society in Paris. Her father, Nicholas Avrillot was accountant general in the Chamber of Paris, and chancellor of Marguerite of […]

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April 18 – St. Willigis

April 17, 2017

St. Willigis Archbishop of Mainz, d. 23 Feb., 1011. Feast, 23 February or 18 April. Though of humble birth he received a good education, and through the influence of Bishop Volkold of Meissen entered the service of Otto I, and after 971 figured as chancellor of Germany. Otto II in 975 made him Archbishop of […]

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April 19 – Captured by pirates

April 17, 2017

St. Alphege (or Elphege), Saint, born 954; died 1012; also called Godwine, martyred Archbishop of Canterbury, left his widowed mother and patrimony for the monastery of Deerhurst (Gloucestershire). After some years as an anchorite at Bath, he there became abbot, and (19 Oct., 984) was made Bishop of Winchester. In 994 Elphege administered confirmation to […]

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April 19 – The saintly warrior pope

April 17, 2017

Pope St. Leo IX Pope St. Leo IX earnestly spread the Cluny reform Born at Egisheim, near Colmar, on the borders of Alsace, 21 June, 1002, Pope St. Leo IX died on 19 April, 1054. He belonged to a noble family which had given or was to give saints to the Church and rulers to […]

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April 19 – Blessed Conrad of Ascoli

April 17, 2017

Friar Minor and missionary, born at Ascoli in the March of Ancona in 1234; died there, 19 April, 1289. He belonged to the noble family of Milliano and from his earliest years made penance the predominating element of his life. He entered the Order of Friars Minor at Ascoli together with his townsman and lifelong […]

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April 20 – Blessed John Finch

April 17, 2017

Bl. John Finch A stained glass window in St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Chorley, England. Permission to use by Roberta Estes. A martyr, b. about 1548; d. 20 April, 1584. He was a yeoman of Eccleston, Lancashire, and a member of a well-known old Catholic family, but he appears to have been brought up in […]

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April 20 – “I beg your Lordship…that my lips and…fingers may be cut off…”

April 17, 2017

Blessed Fr. James Bell Priest and martyr, born at Warrington in Lancashire, England, probably about 1520; died 20 April, 1584. For the little known of him we depend on the account published four years after his death by Bridgewater in his “Concertatio” (1588), and derived from a manuscript which was kept at Douay when Challoner […]

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April 20 – Blessed Richard Sergeant

April 17, 2017

Bl. Richard Sergeant English martyr, executed at Tyburn, 20 April, 1586. He was probably a younger son of Thomas Sergeant of Stone, Gloucestershire, by Katherine, daughter of John Tyre of Hardwick. He took his degree at Oxford (20 Feb., 1570-1), and arrived at the English College, Reims, on 25 July, 1581. He was ordained subdeacon […]

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Queen Elizabeth II presents a Guidon to The Royal Lancers at Windsor Castle

April 13, 2017

According to the Royal Household: The Queen…has presented a Guidon to The Royal Lancers during a ceremony in St George’s Hall, Windsor Castle. During the traditional ceremony at Windsor Castle Her Majesty touched the new Guidon, and presented it to the Regiment. A Guidon is a heraldic banner carried by cavalry regiments. They were traditionally […]

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“It is our duty…”

April 13, 2017

According to the Royal Household, on the 100th anniversary of the battle of Vimy Ridge, Queen Elizabeth II issued this message: [On…] the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge, there will be difficult memories of loss and of suffering, but also memories of many heroic acts of bravery and of sacrifice on the […]

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On Holy Thursday, King Saint Ferdinand washes the feet of twelve poor men

April 13, 2017

Lent passed, and Holy Week came. That year, the love of Christ inflamed the holy King’s heart more than ever. At times he would spend the whole night in contemplation of the sorrows that Our Lord suffered to redeem us; he slept so little that his nobles, worried, reached the point of telling him that […]

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An Invitation to Love the Holy Cross of Our Lord Jesus Christ

April 13, 2017

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira While commemorating the forty days Our Lord fasted in the desert, we should remember a great and supreme truth that should illuminate all Lenten meditations. The holy Gospels clearly show how much our merciful Savior pitied our spiritual and physical pains. Hence, He performed spectacular miracles to mitigate them. However, […]

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April 14 – She suffered for the moral corruption and decay of her time

April 13, 2017

Saint Lydwine In 1380, Saint Lydwine was born in the small town of Schiedam in Holland. Her father was a wealthy noble named Peter, and her mother was from a poor family who worked their own farm. Her father’s family lost their fortune, and the whole family was reduced to poverty. At that time, all […]

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April 16 – Martyred in the name of Equality

April 13, 2017

Just a few of the many martyrs during the French Revolution († 1792-1799) 16 April 1794 in Avrillé, Maine-et-Loire (France) Pierre Delépine layperson of the diocese of Angers born: 24 May 1732 in Marigné, Maine-et-Loire (France) Jean Ménard layperson of the diocese of Angers; married born: 16 November 1736 in Andigné… Read more here.

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April 17 – St. Stephen Harding

April 13, 2017

St. Stephen Harding Confessor, the third Abbot of Cîteaux, was born at Sherborne in Dorsetshire, England, about the middle of the eleventh century; died 28 March, 1134. He received his early education in the monastery of Sherborne and afterwards studied in Paris and Rome. On returning from the latter city he stopped at the monastery […]

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April 17 – One of the many nobles who spread the Cluny reform

April 13, 2017

St. Robert Founder of the Abbey of Chaise-Dieu in Auvergne, born at Aurilac, Auvergne, about 1000; died in Auvergne, 1067. On his father’s side he belonged to the family of the Counts of Aurilac, who had given birth to St. Géraud. He studied at Brioude near the basilica of St-Julien, in a school open to […]

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April 17 – He rescued his country from crushing debt, yet waged incessant war

April 13, 2017

Maximilian I Duke of Bavaria, 1598-1622, Elector of Bavaria and Lord High Steward of the Holy Roman Empire, 1623-1651; born at Munich, 17 April, 1573; died at Ingolstadt, 27 September, 1651. The lasting services he rendered his country and the Catholic Church justly entitle him to the surname of “Great”. He was the son of […]

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April 11 – He excommunicated the king, who murdered him as he celebrated Mass

April 10, 2017

Saint Stanislaus of Cracow In pictures he is given the episcopal insignia and the sword. Larger paintings represent him in a court or kneeling before the altar and receiving the fatal blow. His parents, Belislaus and Bogna, pious and noble Catholics, gave him a religious education. After the death of his parents he distributed his […]

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April 12 – St. Teresa of the Andes

April 10, 2017

Saint Teresa of the Andes, O.C.D. (July 13, 1900 – April 12, 1920), also known as Saint Teresa of Jesus of the Andes (Spanish: Teresa de Jesús de los Andes), was a Chilean nun of the Discalced Carmelite order.She was born Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández y Solar in Santiago, Chile into […]

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April 12 – Crusader in every sense of the word

April 10, 2017

Bl. Angelo Carletti di Chivasso Moral theologian of the order of Friars Minor; born at Chivasso in Piedmont, in 1411; and died at Coni, in Piedmont, in 1495. From his tenderest years the Blessed Angelo was remarkable for the holiness and purity of his life. He attended the University of Bologna, where he received the […]

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April 12 – Pope St. Julius I

April 10, 2017

(337-352) The immediate successor of Pope Silvester, Arcus, ruled the Roman Church for only a very short period – from 18 January to 7 October, 336 – and after his death the papal chair remained vacant for four months. What occasioned this comparatively long vacancy is unknown. On 6 February, 337, Julius, son of Rustics […]

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April 13 – Born blind, lame, deformed, hunchbacked and dwarfed

April 10, 2017

Blessed Margaret of Castello (1287–1320) is the patroness of the poor, crippled, and the unwanted. She was born blind, lame, deformed, hunchbacked and a dwarf, into a family of nobles in the castle of Metola, in southeast of Florence. As a child, her parents Parisio and Emilia imprisoned her for 14 years so no one […]

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April 13 – This Prince Defied His Family

April 10, 2017

St. Hermengild Date of birth unknown; died 13 April, 585. Leovigild, the Arian King of the Visigoths (569-86), had two sons, Hermengild and Reccared, by his first marriage with the Catholic Princess Theodosia. Hermengild married, in 576, Ingundis, a Frankish Catholic princess, the daughter of Sigebert and Brunhilde. Led by his own inclination, and influenced […]

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April 13 – Pope St. Martin I

April 10, 2017

Pope St. Martin I Martyr, born at Todi on the Tiber, son of Fabricius; elected Pope at Rome, 21 July, 649, to succeed Theodore I; d at Cherson in the present peninsulas of Krym, 16 Sept., 655, after a reign of 6 years, one month and twenty six days, having ordained eleven priests, five deacons […]

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The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall dismiss traditional garb in meeting with Pope Francis

April 6, 2017

According to the Royal Forums: The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall had a private audience with Pope Francis on Tuesday as part of their week-long tour of Europe. In a sign of changing times at the Vatican, the Duchess did not wear black or a mantilla, as has been usual tradition for […]

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A Stable Kingdom in Turbulent Times

April 6, 2017

According to Handelsblatt: While Liechtenstein may enjoy political stability, tough times could still be in store for the principality, with populism and protectionism on the rise among its neighbors in Europe. …Prince Alois warns that its major employers – tool maker Hilti, heating and air systems company Hoval, and the prepared foods company Hilcona – […]

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The Legend of St. Dismas

April 6, 2017

by Pauline Sanders Many years ago, after Jesus was born, the evil King Herod waited for the three kings from the Orient to return to his kingdom with news of the newborn King. When they did not return, Herod grew afraid that this new King would cause him to lose his throne. Because of this, […]

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Suffering and the Little Way

April 6, 2017

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira * There is a valuable deposition from the canonization of Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus, given by her sister Céline. It reveals aspects of the saint’s life about which few are aware and to which, even less give due importance. The information contained in this document is ironclad. Not […]

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April 7 – Father of Modern Pedagogy

April 6, 2017

St. John Baptist de la Salle Founder of the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, educational reformer, and father of modern pedagogy, was born at Reims, 30 April, 1651, and died at Saint-Yon, Rouen, on Good Friday, 7 April, 1719. The family of de la Salle traces its origin to Johan Salla, who, […]

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April 8 – Together with a noble who escaped the Terror, she founded the Sisters of Notre Dame

April 6, 2017

St. Julie Billiart (Also Julia). Foundress, and first superior-general of the Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame of Namur, born 12 July, 1751, at Cuvilly, a village of Picardy, in the Diocese of Beauvais and the Department of Oise, France; died 8 April, 1816, at the motherhouse of her institute, Namur, Belgium. She was […]

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April 9 – She persuaded her husband the Count to become a monk

April 6, 2017

St. Waudru She was daughter to the princess St. Bertille, elder sister to St. Aldegondes, and wife to Madelgaire, count of Hainault, and one of the principal lords of King Dagobert’s court. After bearing him two sons and two daughters, she induced him to embrace the monastic state at Haumont, near Maubeuge, taking the name […]

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April 9 – Mary of Cleophas

April 6, 2017

Mary of Cleophas This title occurs only in John, xix, 25. A comparison of the lists of those who stood at the foot of the cross would seem to identify her with Mary, the mother of James the Less and Joseph ( Mark, xv, 40; cf. Matt., xxvii, 56). Some have indeed tried to identify […]

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April 10 – Friend of Cluny

April 6, 2017

St. Fulbert of Chartres Bishop, born between 952 and 962; died 10 April, 1028 or 1029. Mabillon and others think that he was born in Italy, probably at Rome; but Pfister, his latest biographer, designates as his birthplace the Diocese of Laudun in the present department of Gard in France. He was of humble parentage […]

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April 4 – Grandmother of the Templars

April 3, 2017

Saint Aleth of Dijon Mother of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, she belonged to the highest nobility of Burgundy. Her husband, Tescelin, was lord of Fontaines. Saint Bernard of Clairvaux was the third of her seven children.  At the age of nine years, Bernard was sent to a much renowned school at Chatillon-sur-Seine, kept by the […]

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April 4 – Patron Saint of Transitions

April 3, 2017

St. Isidore of Seville Born at Cartagena, Spain, about 560; died 4 April, 636. Isidore was the son of Severianus and Theodora. His elder brother Leander was his immediate predecessor in the Metropolitan See of Seville; whilst a younger brother St. Fulgentius presided over the Bishopric of Astigi. His sister Florentina was a nun, and […]

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