According to The Epoch Times:

…the chaplain of the Paris Fire Brigade, also saved the Blessed Sacrament…

“He showed no fear at all as he made straight for the relics inside the cathedral, and made sure they were saved. He deals with life and death every day, and shows no fear.”

The priest is also a veteran of the French Armed Forces and survived an ambush while on duty in Afghanistan, which left 10 soldiers dead.

The Crown of Thorns, which has been the object of Christian prayer for more than 16 centuries, was brought to Paris by French King Louis IX in 1239.

To read the entire article in The Epoch Times, please click here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

According to ICN:

Prime Minister Theresa May said: “Notre-Dame is one of the most beautiful buildings in the world… and cherished across the globe. The images of destruction we saw last night were truly heart-rending.

“To underline our solidarity with France and her people, the bells at Westminster Abbey will toll at 5.43pm this evening to mark the moment the fire began yesterday. And…on Maundy Thursday, bells will ring at cathedrals and churches across England.

“As we saw last night in the swift and heroic action of the first responders… I pay tribute to the firefighters and all those involved.

To read the entire article on ICN, please click here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Queen Mary I praying before blessing the rings in the tray on her left. The illustration dates to her reign.

Queen Mary I praying before blessing the rings in the tray on her left. The illustration dates to her reign.

On [Good] Friday morning the offertory was performed according to custom in the Church of the Franciscan Friars, which is contiguous to the palace. After the Passion, the Queen came down from her oratory for the adoration of the Cross, accompanied by my lord the right reverend Legate, and kneeling at a short distance from the Cross moved towards It on her knees, praying before It thrice, and then she drew nigh and kissed It, performing this act with such devotion as greatly to edify all those who were present…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

I cannot forget how in one of my trips to Paris, evening was falling when I arrived. I had dinner and went immediately to see Notre Dame. It was a summer evening, but not an extraordinarily beautiful one. The cathedral was all lit up and as my car crossed from the left bank of the river Seine onto the island, I saw the cathedral from a side, a perspective that was completely fortuitous. If the haphazard exists—and in a certain sense it does—I would say that I was instantly surprised by the cathedral in a haphazard way. I gazed and found it so beautiful that I felt like saying to the driver, “Stop! I want to stay right here. I know the rest of it is very beautiful, but I believe that few souls ever stopped to look at the cathedral from this vantage point; and I want to be among the few to render praise to Our Lady from this perspective that others perhaps did not praise sufficiently. At least it will be said that there was once a pilgrim from afar that loved what many others did not love, because they were in a hurry, or perhaps because they did not receive a special grace at that moment.”

And at all the great monuments of Christendom, after admiring their marvels, it is my tendency to admire their details in an act of reparation; for perhaps those details were not loved as they should have been. And thus, to do at least this: To love what should have been loved but was forgotten. It is always our vocation to bring to the forefront those forgotten truths set aside by men. I was enchanted with the cathedral from that angle. Then I walked around and returned to the hotel with my soul filled to the brim. If at that moment anyone had repeated the words of Scripture, “Behold the church of perfect beauty, the joy of the whole world,” I would have said: “Ah yes! How well formulated this is. It is exactly how I feel towards this cathedral.”

And then, from the depth of our souls, from the depth of our innocence, something else rises. It is a light, a super light, but at the same time a penumbra or obscurity without darkness; and it is the idea that all of the world’s Gothic cathedrals, those that were built and those that were not, convey as an ensemble an idea of God, Who nevertheless is infinitely more than all that. At this the mentality that inspired all of those cathedrals appears to us and then truly we live more in Heaven than on earth.

Hence our desire for a different life, to know Another, with a capital “A”, Who is so entirely within me that He is more myself than I, but so superior that I am not even a speck of dust compared to Him…   And then I understand that Heaven must be like this. We love even more that most pure, eternal and invisible spirit Who created all of this in order to say, “My son, I exist. Love Me, and understand that this is similar to Me, but above all understand that as beautiful as this is I am infinitely different from this; mine is a form of beauty so quintessential and superior, that only when you see Me will you fully realize Who I am.

Come, My son, come because I am waiting for you. Fight for a little longer, for I am preparing to show you even greater beauties in Heaven in the measure that your fight is great and hard. Wait, and when everything I intended to show you from the moment I created you is ready, I will say: ‘My son, I am your Cathedral; that Cathedral immeasurably great; that Cathedral immeasurably beautiful; that Cathedral which made a smile flourish on the lips of the Virgin as no jewel ever did, as no rose ever did, as none of the mere creatures She came to know ever did. That Cathedral is Our Lord Jesus Christ. It is the Heart of Jesus, Who drew from the Heart of Mary harmonies like nothing else ever did. Then will you come to know Him, Who said: ‘I Myself will be your reward immeasurably great.’”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Pope St. Leo IX

Pope St. Leo IXPope St. Leo IX earnestly spread the Cluny reform

Born at Egisheim, near Colmar, on the borders of Alsace, 21 June, 1002, Pope St. Leo IX died on 19 April, 1054. He belonged to a noble family which had given or was to give saints to the Church and rulers to the Empire. He was named Bruno. His father Hugh was first cousin to Emperor Conrad, and both Hugh and his wife Heilewide were remarkable for their piety and learning.

When five years of age, he was committed to the care of the energetic Berthold, Bishop of Toul, who had a school for the sons of the nobility. Intelligent, graceful in body, and gracious in disposition, Bruno was a favorite with his schoolfellows. Whilst still a youth and at home for his holidays, he was attacked when asleep by some animal, and so much injured that for some time he lay between life and death. In that condition he saw, as he used afterwards to tell his friends, a vision of St. Benedict, who cured him by touching his wounds with a cross. This we are told by Leo’s principal biographer, Wibert, who was his intimate friend when the saint was Bishop of Toul.

Bruno became a canon of St. Stephen’s at Toul (1017), and though still quite young exerted a soothing influence on Herimann, the choleric successor of Bishop Berthold. When, in 1024, Conrad, Bruno’s cousin, succeeded the Emperor Henry I, the saint’s relatives sent him to the new king’s court “to serve in his chapel”. His virtue soon made itself felt, and his companions, to distinguish him from others who bore the same name, always spoke of him as “the good Bruno”…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Alphege

St. Alphege being asked for advice.

St. Alphege being asked for advice.

(or Elphege), Saint, born 954; died 1012; also called Godwine, martyred Archbishop of Canterbury, left his widowed mother and patrimony for the monastery of Deerhurst (Gloucestershire).

After some years as an anchorite at Bath, he there became abbot, and (19 Oct., 984) was made Bishop of Winchester. In 994 Elphege administered confirmation to Olaf of Norway at Andover, and it is suggested that his patriotic spirit inspired the decrees of the Council of Enham. In 1006, on becoming Archbishop of Canterbury, he went to Rome for the pallium. At this period England was much harassed by the Danes, who, towards the end of September, 1011, having sacked and burned Canterbury, made Elphege a prisoner.

On 19 April, 1012, at Greenwich, his captors, drunk with wine, and enraged at ransom being refused, pelted Elphege with bones of oxen and stones, till one Thurm dispatched him with an axe. Elphege’s body, after resting eleven years in St. Paul’s (London), was translated by King Canute to Canterbury.

His principal feast is kept on the 19th of April; that of his translation on the 8th of June.

He is sometimes represented with an axe cleaving his skull.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, ed. PLUMMER (Oxford, 1892-99); THIETMAR, Chronicle, in P. L., CXXXIX, 1384; OSBERN, Vita S. Elphegi in WHARTON, Anglia Sacra, II, 122 sqq.; Acta SS., April, II, 630; Bibl. Hag. Lat., 377; CHEVALIER, Repertoire, I, 1313; FREEMAN, Norman Conquest, I, v; BUTLER, Lives of the Saints, 18 April; STANTON, Menology, 19 April; HUNT in Dict. Nat. Biogr., s. v. AElfheah.

PATRICK RYAN (Catholic Encyclopedia)

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Friar Minor and missionary, born at Ascoli in the March of Ancona in 1234; died there, 19 April, 1289.

He belonged to the noble family of Milliano and from his earliest years made penance the predominating element of his life…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Blessed Fr. James Bell

Stone marking the site of the Tyburn tree on the traffic island at the junction of Edgware Road, Marble Arch and Oxford Street

Stone marking the site of the Tyburn tree on the traffic island at the junction of Edgware Road, Marble Arch and Oxford Street

Priest and martyr, born at Warrington in Lancashire, England, probably about 1520; died 20 April, 1584. For the little known of him we depend on the account published four years after his death by Bridgewater in his “Concertatio” (1588), and derived from a manuscript which was kept at Douay when Challoner wrote his “Missionary Priests” in 1741, and is now in the Westminster Diocesan Archives. A few further details were collected by Challoner, and others are supplied by the State Papers. Having studied at Oxford he was ordained priest in Mary’s reign, but unfortunately conformed to the established Church under Elizabeth, and according to the Douay MS. “ministered their bare few sacraments about 20 years in diverse places of England”.  Finally deterred by conscience from the cure of souls and reduced to destitution, he sought a small readership as a bare subsistence. To obtain this he approached the patron’s wife, a Catholic lady, who induced him to be reconciled to the Church. After some time he was allowed to resume priestly functions, and for two years devoted himself to arduous missionary labours. He was at length apprehended (17 January 1583-84) and, having confessed his priesthood, was arraigned at Manchester Quarter-Sessions held during the same month, and sent for trial at Lancaster Assizes in March. When condemned and sentenced he said to the Judge: “I beg your Lordship would add to the sentence that my lips and the tops of my fingers may be cut off, for having sworn and subscribed to the articles of heretics contrary both to my conscience and to God’s Truth”. He spent that night in prayer and on the following day was hanged and quartered together with Ven. John Finch, a layman, 20 April, 1584.

He was beatified in 1929.

BRIDGEWATER, Concertatio ecclesiæ Catholicæ in Anglia, 1588; YEPEZ, Historia particular de la persecucion de Inglatera, 1599; CHALLONER, Missionary Priests 1741; Dict. Nat. Biog., IV, 163; GILLOW, Bibl. Dict. Eng. Cath., I, 173, citing State Papers in Public Record Office.

EDWIN BURTON (Catholic Encyclopedia)

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Bl. Richard Sergeant

This is an illustration, said to be from about 1680, of the permanent gallows at Tyburn, which once stood where Marble Arch now stands. There was a three-mile cart ride in public from Newgate prison to the gallows, with large spectator stands lined along the way, so many people could see the hangings (for a fee). Huge crowds collected on the way and followed the accused to Tyburn.

This is an illustration, said to be from about 1680, of the permanent gallows at Tyburn, which once stood where Marble Arch now stands. There was a three-mile cart ride in public from Newgate prison to the gallows, with large spectator stands lined along the way, so many people could see the hangings (for a fee). Huge crowds collected on the way and followed the accused to Tyburn.

English martyr, executed at Tyburn, 20 April, 1586. He was probably a younger son of Thomas Sergeant of Stone, Gloucestershire, by Katherine, daughter of John Tyre of Hardwick. He took his degree at Oxford (20 Feb., 1570-1), and arrived at the English College, Reims, on 25 July, 1581. He was ordained subdeacon at Reims (4 April, 1582), deacon at Soissons (9 June, 1582), and priest at Laon (7 April, 1583). He said his first Mass on 21 April, and left for England on 10 September. He was indicted at the Old Bailey (17 April, 1586) as Richard lea alias Longe. With him was condemned and suffered Venerable William Thomson, a native of Blackburn, Lancashire, who arrived at the English College, Reims, on 28 May, 1583, and was ordained priest in the Reims cathedral (31 March, 1583-4). Thomson was arrested in the house of Roger Line, husband of the martyr Anne Line (q. v.) in Bishopsgate St. Without, while saying Mass. Both were executed merely for being priests and coming into the realm.

He was beatified in 1987.

CHALLONER, Missionary priests, I (London, 1878), nos. 32, 33; KNOX, Douay Diaries (London, 1878); FOSTER, Alumni Oxonienses, (Oxford, 1892); Harleian Soc. Publ. xxi (London, 1885), 258; POLLEN, English Martyrs 1584-1603 in Cath. Rec. Soc. (London, 1908), 129; Cath. Rec. Soc. II (London, 1906), 249, 255, 271.

John B. Wainewright (Catholic Encyclopedia)

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Bl. John Finch

A martyr, born about 1548; died 20 April, 1584.

He was a yeoman of Eccleston, Lancashire, and a member of a well-known old Catholic family, but he appears to have been brought up in schism. When he was twenty years old he went to London where he spent nearly a year with some cousins at Inner Temple. While there he was forcibly struck by the contrast between Protestantism and Catholicism in practice and determined to lead a Catholic life. Failing to find advancement in London he returned to Lancashire where he was reconciled to Catholic Church. He then married and settled down, his house becoming a centre of missionary work, he himself harbouring priests and aiding them in every way, besides acting as catechist. His zeal drew on him the hostility of the authorities, and at Christmas, 1581, he was entrapped into bringing a priest, George Ostliffe, to a place where both were apprehended. It was given out that Finch, having betrayed the priest and other Catholics, had taken refuge with the Earl of Derby, but in fact, he was kept in the earl’s house as a prisoner, sometimes tortured and sometimes bribed in order to pervert him and induce him to give information. This failing, he was removed to the Fleet prison at Manchester and afterwards to the House of Correction. When he refused to go to the Protestant church he was dragged there by the feet, his head beating on the stones. For many months he lay in a damp dungeon, ill-fed and ill-treated, desiring always that he might be brought to trial and martyrdom. After three years’ imprisonment, he was sent to be tried at Lancaster. There he was brought to trial with three priests on 18 April, 1584. He was found guilty and, 20 April, having spent the night in converting some condemned felons, he suffered with Ven. James Bell at Lancaster. The cause of his beatification with those of the other English Martyrs was introduced by decree of the Sacred Congregation of Rites, 4 Dec., 1886…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

When Finan died, leaving Bishop Coman—like himself, Irish by birth and a monk of Iona—as his successor at Lindisfarne, the dispute became at once open and general. Wilfrid had succeeded in sowing agitation and uncertainty in all minds; and the Northumbrians had come so far as to ask themselves whether the religion which had been taught to them, and which they practiced, was indeed the religion of that Christ whose name it bore…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

The time to arrive was about 11:30 p.m., when the great church, packed to its doors by a vast throng, was wrapped in almost total darkness…. As the eyes grew accustomed to the shadows, tens of thousands of unlighted candles, outlining the arches, cornices, and other architectural features of the cathedral, were just visible. These candles each had their wick touched with kerosene and then surrounded with a thread of gun-cotton, which ran continuously from candle to candle right round the building. When the hanging end of the thread of gun-cotton was lighted, the flame ran swiftly round the church, kindling each candle in turn; a very fascinating sight.… When, as the first stroke of midnight pealed form the great clock, the Metropolitan of Petrograd announced in a loud voice, “Christ is risen!”…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Anselm

Archbishop of Canterbury, Doctor of the Church; born at Aosta a Burgundian town on the confines of Lombardy, died 21 April, 1109.

His father, Gundulf, was a Lombard who had become a citizen of Aosta, and his mother, Ermenberga, came of an old Burgundian family. Like many other saints, Anselm learnt the first lessons of piety from his mother, and at a very early age he was fired with the love of learning. In after life he still cherished the memories of childhood, and his biographer, Eadmer, has preserved some incidents which he had learnt from the saint’s own lips. The child had heard his mother speak of God, Who dwelt on high ruling all things. Living in the mountains, he thought that Heaven must be on their lofty summits. “And while he often revolved these matters in his mind, it chanced that one night he saw in a vision that he must go up to the summit…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Leonidas

(Or LEONIDES.)

The Roman Martyrology records several feast days of martyrs of this name in different countries. Under date of 28 January there is a martyr called Leonides, a native of the Thebaid, whose death with several companions is supposed to have occurred during the Diocletian persecution (Acta SS., January, II, 832). Another Leonides appears on 2 September, in a long list of martyrs headed by a St. Diomedes. Together with a St. Eleutherius, a Leonides is honoured on 8 August. From other sources we know of a St. Leonidas, Bishop of Athens, who lived about the sixth century, and whose feast is celebrated on 15 April (“Acta SS.”, April, II, 378; “Bibliotheca hagiographica graeca”, 2nd ed., 137). Still another martyr of the name is honoured on 16 April, with Callistus, Charysius, and other companions (Acta SS., April, II, 402)…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Pedralvarez Cabral

(Pedro Alvarez.)

A celebrated Portugese navigator, generally called the discoverer of Brazil, born probably around 1460; date of death uncertain. Very little is known concerning the life of Cabral. He was the third son of Fernao Cabral, Governor of Beira and Belmonte, and Isabel de Gouvea, and married Isabel de Castro, the daughter of the distinguished Fernando de Noronha. He must have had an exellent training ini navigation and large experience as a seaman, for King Emmanuel of Portugal considered him competent to continue the work of Vasco da Gama, and in the year 1500 placed him in command of a fleet which was to set sail for India. His commision was to establish permanent commercial relations and to introduce Christianity wherever he went, using force of arms when necessary to gain his point. The nature of the undertaking led rich Florentine merchants to contribute to the equipment of the ships, and priests to join the expedition. Among the captains of the fleet, which consisted of thirteen ships with 1,200 men, were Bartolomeu Diaz, Pero Vaz de Caminha, and Nicolao Coelho, the latter the companion of da Gama. Da Gama himself gave the directions necessary for the course of…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Just a few of the many martyrs during the French Revolution († 1792-1799)

16 April 1794 in Avrillé, Maine-et-Loire (France)

Pierre Delépine
layperson of the diocese of Angers
born: 24 May 1732 in Marigné, Maine-et-Loire (France)
Jean Ménard
layperson of the diocese of Angers; married
born: 16 November 1736 in Andigné, Maine-et-Loire (France)
Renée Bourgeais veuve Juret
layperson of the diocese of Angers; married
born: 12 November 1751 in Montjean, Maine-et-Loire (France)
Perrine Bourigault
layperson of the diocese of Angers
born: 07 August 1743 in Montjean, Maine-et-Loire (France)
Madeleine Cady épouse Desvignes
layperson of the diocese of Angers; married

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Stephen Harding

Confessor, the third Abbot of Cîteaux, was born at Sherborne in Dorsetshire, England, about the middle of the eleventh century; died 28 March, 1134. He received his early education in the monastery of Sherborne and afterwards studied in Paris and Rome. On returning from the latter city he stopped at the monastery of Molesme and, being much impressed by the holiness of St. Robert, the abbot, joined that community. Here he practised great austerities, became one of St. Robert’s chief supporters and was one of the band of twenty-one monks who, by authority of Hugh, Archbishop of Lyons, retired to Cîteaux to institute a reform in the new foundation there…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Robert

Founder of the Abbey of Chaise-Dieu in Auvergne, born at Aurilac, Auvergne, about 1000; died in Auvergne, 1067.

St. Robert print by Raphael Sadeler & Marten de Vos

St. Robert print by Raphael Sadeler & Marten de Vos

On his father’s side he belonged to the family of the Counts of Aurilac, who had given birth to St. Géraud. He studied at Brioude near the basilica of St-Julien, in a school open to the nobility of Auvergne by the canons of that city. Having entered their community, and being ordained priest, Robert distinguished himself by his piety, charity, apostolic zeal, eloquent discourses, and the gift of miracles…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Maximilian I

Duke of Bavaria, 1598-1622, Elector of Bavaria and Lord High Steward of the Holy Roman Empire, 1623-1651; born at Munich, 17 April, 1573; died at Ingolstadt, 27 September, 1651.

The lasting services he rendered his country and the Catholic Church justly entitle him to the surname of “Great”. He was the son of zealous Catholic parents, William V, the Pious, of Bavaria, and Renate of Lorraine…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Thomas of Jesus

(THOMAS DE ANDRADA).

Reformer and preacher, born at Lisbon, 1529; died at Sagena, Morocco, 17 April, 1582. He was educated by the Augustinian Hermits from age of ten, entered the order at Lisbon in 1534, completed his studies at Coimbra, and was appointed novice-master. In his zeal for primitive observance he attempted a thorough reform of the order, but the opposition was such that he was obliged to desist. However, the eventual establishment of the Discalced or Reformed Augustinians is attributed to the initiative of Thomas de Andrada (see Hermits of St. Augustine). High in favour at Court, Thomas assisted, in 1578, at the death of John III, of which he has left an interesting narrative in a letter still extant…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

April 17 – Mother of Fr. Gallitzin

April 15, 2019

Adele Amalie Gallitzin (Or GOLYZIN). Princess; b. at Berlin, 28 Aug., 1748; d. at Angelmodde, near Münster, Westphalia, 17 April, 1806. She was the daughter of the Prussian General Count von Schmettau, and educated in the Catholic faith, though she soon became estranged from her religion. In 1768, she married the Russian Prince Dimitry Alexejewitsch […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 17 – Controversial Pope

April 15, 2019

Pope Benedict III Date of birth unknown; d. 17 April, 858. The election of the learned and ascetic Roman, Benedict, the son of Peter, was a troubled one. On the death of Leo IV (17 July, 855) Benedict was chosen to succeed him, and envoys were despatched to secure the ratification of the decree of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 17 – Martyred at Tyburn

April 15, 2019

Ven. Henry Heath English Franciscan and martyr, son of John Heath; christened at St. John’s, Peterborough, 16 December, 1599; executed at Tyburn, 17 April, 1643. He went to Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, 1617, proceeded B.A. in 1621, and was made college librarian. In 1622 he was received into the Church by George Muscott, and, after […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 18 – Blessed Marie de l’Incarnation

April 15, 2019

Bl. Marie de l’Incarnation Known also as Madame Acarie, foundress of the French Carmel, born in Paris, 1 February, 1566; died at Pontoise, April, 1618. By her family Barbara Avrillot belonged to the higher bourgeois society in Paris. Her father, Nicholas Avrillot was accountant general in the Chamber of Paris, and chancellor of Marguerite of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 18 – St. Willigis

April 15, 2019

St. Willigis Archbishop of Mainz, d. 23 Feb., 1011. Feast, 23 February or 18 April. Though of humble birth he received a good education, and through the influence of Bishop Volkold of Meissen entered the service of Otto I, and after 971 figured as chancellor of Germany. Otto II in 975 made him Archbishop of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

On Holy Thursday, King Saint Ferdinand washes the feet of twelve poor men

April 15, 2019

Lent passed, and Holy Week came. That year, the love of Christ inflamed the holy King’s heart more than ever. At times he would spend the whole night in contemplation of the sorrows that Our Lord suffered to redeem us; he slept so little that his nobles, worried, reached the point of telling him that […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

How Napoleon’s Man Arrested the Pope

April 11, 2019

Here we have the whole history of Radet*. Gillet, the representative of the people, appointed him brigadier-general to the Army of the North, whence he dispatched him as chief of constabulary to Avignon, where Bonaparte, on returning from Egypt, was so much struck with his behaviour that he sent him to Corsica, whence he recalled […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Priest rebukes King publicly during Holy Week ceremony

April 11, 2019

Jesuit Father Gouthier preached to the Court at Saint-Gervais during the Holy Week ceremonies, but became upset with the ladies’ behavior, seeing them giggling and sending frequent signals to the king so as to provoke him to laughter as well. Indignant, he raised his voice from the pulpit and said: —    “Your Majesty, when will […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

The Single Front of the Revolution

April 11, 2019

[previous] D. The Single Front of the Revolution   Such “clots” and crystallizations normally lead to clashes between the forces of the Revolution. Considering them, one might think that the powers of evil are divided against themselves and that our unitary concept of the revolutionary process is false. Such an idea is an illusion. By […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 12 – Crusader in every sense of the word

April 11, 2019

Bl. Angelo Carletti di Chivasso Moral theologian of the order of Friars Minor; born at Chivasso in Piedmont, in 1411; and died at Coni, in Piedmont, in 1495. From his tenderest years the Blessed Angelo was remarkable for the holiness and purity of his life. He attended the University of Bologna, where he received the […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 12 – St. Teresa of the Andes

April 11, 2019

Saint Teresa of the Andes, O.C.D. (July 13, 1900 – April 12, 1920), also known as Saint Teresa of Jesus of the Andes (Spanish: Teresa de Jesús de los Andes), was a Chilean nun of the Discalced Carmelite order. She was born Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández y Solar in Santiago, Chile […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 12 – Pope St. Julius I

April 11, 2019

(337-352) The immediate successor of Pope Silvester, Arcus, ruled the Roman Church for only a very short period – from 18 January to 7 October, 336 – and after his death the papal chair remained vacant for four months. What occasioned this comparatively long vacancy is unknown. On 6 February, 337, Julius, son of Rustics […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 13 – Born blind, lame, deformed, hunchbacked and dwarfed

April 11, 2019

Blessed Margaret of Castello (1287–1320) is the patroness of the poor, crippled, and the unwanted. She was born blind, lame, deformed, hunchbacked and a dwarf, into a family of nobles in the castle of Metola, in southeast of Florence. As a child, her parents Parisio and Emilia imprisoned her for 14 years so no one […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 13 – This Prince Defied His Family

April 11, 2019

St. Hermengild Date of birth unknown; died 13 April, 585. Leovigild, the Arian King of the Visigoths (569-86), had two sons, Hermengild and Reccared, by his first marriage with the Catholic Princess Theodosia. Hermengild married, in 576, Ingundis, a Frankish Catholic princess, the daughter of Sigebert and Brunhilde. Led by his own inclination, and influenced […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 13 – Pope St. Martin I

April 11, 2019

Pope St. Martin I Martyr, born at Todi on the Tiber, son of Fabricius; elected Pope at Rome, 21 July, 649, to succeed Theodore I; d at Cherson in the present peninsulas of Krym, 16 Sept., 655, after a reign of 6 years, one month and twenty six days, having ordained eleven priests, five deacons […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 14 – She suffered for the moral corruption and decay of her time

April 11, 2019

Saint Lydwine In 1380, Saint Lydwine was born in the small town of Schiedam in Holland. Her father was a wealthy noble named Peter, and her mother was from a poor family who worked their own farm. Her father’s family lost their fortune, and the whole family was reduced to poverty. At that time, all […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 14 – St. Peter Gonzalez (aka St. Elmo)

April 11, 2019

St. Peter Gonzalez Popularly known as St. Elmo, b. in 1190 at Astorga, Spain; d. 15 April, 1246, at Tuy. He was educated by his uncle, Bishop of Astorga, who gave him when very young a canonry. Later he entered the Dominican Order and became a renowned preacher; crowds gathered to hear him and numberless […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 15 – The Notkers of St. Gall

April 11, 2019

Notker.—Among the various monks of St. Gall who bore this name, the following are the most important: (1) Notker Balbulus (Stammerer), Blessed, monk and author, b. about 840, at Jonswil, canton of St. Gall (Switzerland); d. 912. Of a distinguished family, he received his education with Tuotilo, originator of tropes, at St. Gall’s, from Iso […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 9 – She persuaded her husband the Count to become a monk

April 8, 2019

St. Waudru She was daughter to the princess St. Bertille, elder sister to St. Aldegondes, and wife to Madelgaire, count of Hainault, and one of the principal lords of King Dagobert’s court. After bearing him two sons and two daughters, she induced him to embrace the monastic state at Haumont, near Maubeuge, taking the name […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 9 – Mary of Cleophas

April 8, 2019

Mary of Cleophas This title occurs only in John, xix, 25. A comparison of the lists of those who stood at the foot of the cross would seem to identify her with Mary, the mother of James the Less and Joseph ( Mark, xv, 40; cf. Matt., xxvii, 56). Some have indeed tried to identify […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 10 – Friend of Cluny

April 8, 2019

St. Fulbert of Chartres Bishop, born between 952 and 962; died 10 April, 1028 or 1029. Mabillon and others think that he was born in Italy, probably at Rome; but Pfister, his latest biographer, designates as his birthplace the Diocese of Laudun in the present department of Gard in France. He was of humble parentage […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 10 – Pope Gregory XIII

April 8, 2019

Pope Gregory XIII (UGO BUONCOMPAGNI). Born at Bologna, 7 Jan., 1502; died at Rome, 10 April, 1585. He studied jurisprudence at the University of Bologna, from which he was graduated at an early age as doctor of canon and of civil law. Later, he taught jurisprudence at the same university, and had among his pupils […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 11 – He excommunicated the king, who murdered him as he celebrated Mass

April 8, 2019

Saint Stanislaus of Cracow In pictures he is given the episcopal insignia and the sword. Larger paintings represent him in a court or kneeling before the altar and receiving the fatal blow. His parents, Belislaus and Bogna, pious and noble Catholics, gave him a religious education. After the death of his parents he distributed his […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 11 – American Hero of the Seal of Confession

April 8, 2019

Antony Kohlmann Educator and missionary, b. 13 July, 1771, at Kaiserberg, Alsace; d. at Rome, 11 April, 1836. He is to be ranked among the lights of the restored Society of Jesus, and among its most distinguished members in America, where he spent nearly a quarter of a century of his laborious life. At an […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 11 – “The sorest and dangerousest papist”

April 8, 2019

Sampson Erdeswicke Antiquarian, date of birth unknown; d. 1603. He was born at Sandon in Staffordshire, his father, Hugh Erdeswicke, being descended from Richard de Vernon, Baron of Shipbrook, in the reign of William the Conqueror. The family resided originally at Erdeswicke Hall, in Cheshire, afterwards at Leighton and finally in the reign of Edward […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 11 – American Catholic Founding Father

April 8, 2019

Stephen Moylan An American patriot and merchant, born in Ireland in 1734; died at Philadelphia, 11 April, 1811. He received his education in Ireland, but resided for some time in England, and seems to have travelled considerably on the Continent before emigrating to the American Colonies where he settled in the city of Philadelphia. He […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 11 – Antonio Ruiz de Montoya

April 8, 2019

Antonio Ruiz de Montoya One of the most distinguished pioneers of the original Jesuit mission in Paraguay, and a remarkable linguist; b. at Lima Peru, on 13 June, 1585, d. there 11 April, 1652. After a youth full of wild and daring pranks and adventures he entered the Society of Jesus on 1 November, 1606. […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 11 – Convicted for being a priest

April 8, 2019

George Gervase (Jervise.) Priest and martyr, born at Boscham, Suffolk, England, 1571; died at Tyburn, 11 April, 1608. His mother’s name was Shelly, and both his father’s and mother’s families had been long established in the County of Suffolk. Losing both parents in boyhood, he was kidnapped by pirates and carried off beyond seas, remaining […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 11 – His donations helped build the first California missions

April 8, 2019

Juan Caballero y Ocio Born at Querétaro, Mexico, 4 May, 1644; died there 11 April, 1707. A priest remarkable for lavish gifts to the Church and for charity. While still a layman he was a mayor of his native city. After taking Holy Orders he held several high offices. He gave large sums of money […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 11 – James Burns, of Burns and Oates

April 8, 2019

James Burns Publisher and author, b. near Montrose, Forfarshire, Scotland, 1808; d. in London, 11 April, 1871. During the last half of the nineteenth century his work in the cause of Catholic literature and Catholic church music contributed much to the rapid advancement of the Church in Great Britain and to the many conversions that […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 11 – St. Guthlac

April 8, 2019

St. Guthlac Hermit; born about 673; died at Croyland, England, 11 April, 714. Our authority for the life of St. Guthlac is the monk Felix (of what monastery is not known), who in his dedication of the “Life” to King Æthelbald, Guthlac’s friend, assures him that whatever he has written, he had derived immediately from […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

The Last Days At The Tuileries

April 4, 2019

During one of the last nights of July, at one o’clock, Madame Campan was alone near the Queen’s bed, when she heard some one walking softly in the adjoining corridor, which was ordinarily locked at both ends. Madame Campan summoned the valet-de-chambre, who went into the corridor; presently the noise of two men fighting reached […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Complex Entireties in the Transisphere

April 4, 2019

Reality is not only that which is visible, but above all that which is invisible. Whenever an entirety is formed according to God, whatever the people or things, it is possible that this entirety have an angel that cares for it and gives it character. A woods, for example, or an architectonic entirety such as […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 5 – Soul on Fire

April 4, 2019

St. Vincent Ferrer Famous Dominican missionary, born at Valencia, 23 January, 1350; died at Vannes, Brittany, 5 April, 1419. He was descended from the younger of two brothers who were knighted for their valor in the conquest of Valencia, 1238. In 1340 Vincent’s father, William Ferrer, married Constantia Miguel, whose family had likewise been ennobled […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 5 – St. Æthelburh and the Rose Named After Her

April 4, 2019

Saint Æthelburh (died 647), also known as Ethelburga, Ædilburh and Æthelburga (Old English: Æþelburh), was an early Anglo-Saxon queen consort of Northumbria, the second wife of King Edwin. As she was a Christian from Kent, their marriage triggered the initial phase of the conversion of the pagan north of England to Christianity… Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 5 – St. Ruadhan

April 4, 2019

St. Ruadhan One of the twelve “Apostles of Erin”; died at the monastery of Lorrha, County Tipperary, Ireland, 5 April, 584. Ruadhan studied under Saint Finian of Clonard. His embassy to King Dermot at Tara, in 556, is worked into a romance known as the “Cursing of Tara”, but the ardri continued to reside at […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 6 – With his head split open, he wrote on the ground with his own blood: “Credo”

April 4, 2019

St. Peter of Verona Born at Verona, 1206; died near Milan, 6 April, 1252. His parents were adherents of the Manichæan heresy, which still survived in northern Italy in the thirteenth century. Sent to a Catholic school, and later to the University of Bologna, he there met St. Dominic, and entered the Order of the […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 6 – He wrote the genealogy of the Danish kings to disprove the alleged impediment of consanguinity

April 4, 2019

St. William of Ebelholt (Also called William of Paris, or William of Eskilsöe) Died on Easter Sunday, 1203, and was buried at Ebelholt. He was educated by his uncle Hugh, forty-second Abbot of St-Germain-des-Pres at Paris; and having been ordained subdeacon received a canonry in the Church of Ste-Geneviève-du-Mont. His exemplary life did not commend […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 7 – Father of Modern Pedagogy

April 4, 2019

St. John Baptist de la Salle Founder of the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, educational reformer, and father of modern pedagogy, was born at Reims, 30 April, 1651, and died at Saint-Yon, Rouen, on Good Friday, 7 April, 1719. The family of de la Salle traces its origin to Johan Salla, who, […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

April 8 – Together with a noble who escaped the Terror, she founded the Sisters of Notre Dame

April 4, 2019

St. Julie Billiart (Also Julia). Foundress, and first superior-general of the Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame of Namur, born 12 July, 1751, at Cuvilly, a village of Picardy, in the Diocese of Beauvais and the Department of Oise, France; died 8 April, 1816, at the motherhouse of her institute, Namur, Belgium. She was […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →